Newsletter (August) – Visualize your business’ soaring numbers

Revamped graphs, new data and customization options

As our platform gets more connected, access to data is becoming more encompassing and substantial. Authentise is working on revamping the graphs to include even more of the information you’re looking for.

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Here is some of the new data to be included in the improved graph selection, with much more to come in future releases:

  • OEE
  • Availability (Downtime vs Operating time)
  • Quality/Yield (total fails vs total builds)
  • Performance (spikes)
  • Throughput (cm3 per machine)

ca8ef43e-ee89-48ba-b5ea-2ed19518cbf8The more of our products you use, the more information you can display. With our Manufacturing Execution System, for instance, you can manage and utilize parts in process (value$ + #), On-time delivery, Manufacturing Cycle Time (time from order to shipped), Time/Cost per cm3 and many more.

Which APIs to customize the dashboards and receiving data for other systems used in your organization are the most valuable to you?

Please let us know by contacting our CMO Frank Speck at frank@authentise.com.

You can also find out more about Authentise and its services on our website and news page.


Authentise will be at IMTS 2018!

At IMTS, and in partnership with America Makes, we are planning a display of the power of Industry 4.0 in Additive Manufacturing. By interfacing with various booths within the event and even with external, remote locations, you’ll be able to see real-time operational data from all connected 3D printers.

Come see us at Additive ETC, located on Level 3 of the West Building at McCormick Center.


How AI is changing the face of manufacturing, and much more (Authentise Weekly News-In-Review – Week 85)

As AI is getting a foothold in pretty much every corner of the digital world, industries like manufacturing have a lot to gain by employing its perks. We at Authentise know very well the power of machine learning and the many other tools that enable our customers to get deeper, insightful looks into their production and save time in production. The next generation in Additive AI will likely be in-print monitoring platforms. The way these technologies are affecting every industry scared people into thinking that there’s going to be less room for human employees. Not only will there be value in the collaboration between humans and AIs, but new types of jobs will be created because of it. On a side note, it’s also interesting to see how 3D printing is enabling new computing paradigms to be researched, closing the loop beautifully.

Kansas State University Researchers Develop AI System For 3D Printing Process Monitoring

Researchers from Kansas State University’s Department of Industrial and Manufacturing Systems Engineering (IMSE) have developed a new quality monitoring system for the 3D printing process. With integrated supervised machine learning, a camera, and image processing software, the researchers created a production quality monitoring system for assessing 3D printed parts in real-time.

Read the full article here.

New Supply Chain Jobs Are Emerging as AI Takes Hold

Companies are cutting supply chain complexity and accelerating responsiveness using the tools of artificial intelligence. Through AI, machine learning, robotics, and advanced analytics, firms are augmenting knowledge-intensive areas such as supply chain planning, customer order management, and inventory tracking. What does that mean for the supply chain workforce? It does not mean human workers will become obsolete. In fact, a new book by Paul Daugherty and H. James Wilson debunks the widespread misconception that AI systems will replace humans in one industry after another. While AI will be deployed to manage certain tasks, including higher-level decision making, the technology’s true power is in augmenting human capabilities — and that holds true in the supply chain.

Read the rest at Harvard Business Review.

This AI Calculates at the Speed of Light

Researchers from UCLA on Thursday revealed a 3D-printed, optical neural network that allows computers to solve complex mathematical computations at the speed of light. […] researchers believe this computing technique could shift the power of machine learning algorithms, the math that underlies many of the artificial intelligence applications in use today, into an entirely new gear.

Read the full article at Discover Magazine.

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Maybe now Manufacturers will take Cyber-security seriously? (Authentise Weekly News-In-Review – Week 84)

A bunch of manufacturing related cybersecurity stories hit the news in the last week. We hold little hope that it will change things.

First, over 150 GB of raw manufacturing data was released into the wild, then a customised virus hit the manufacturing operations of iPhone semiconductor supplier TCMS in a hit that was reminiscent of the Stuxnet attack on Iran’s centrifuges, and nobody noticed when an Israeli company suggested a way to get around the intercept problem uncovered by Chris Williams @Virginia a few years ago.

Truth is, despite representing 16% of GDP in the US, manufacturing is still seriously flummoxed by cybersecrutiy.  The gut reaction of many in the industry is simply to say: let’s not connect our devices then. That is increasingly impossible and dangerous to growth. Continued resilience to solutions will hamper our ability to bring manufacturing into the 21st century. We’ve presented solutions (both technological and theoretical) but await a more dynamic response from the industry. Maybe we’ll see more at IMTS this year? Join us there!

More Than 150 Gigabytes of Manufacturing Data Found Exposed on Web

A misconfigured data transfer server left sensitive data from big name car makers and their employees wide open to the Internet earlier this month, a security vendor has revealed. Itnews.com reports that documents belonging to more than 100 manufacturing companies were exposed on a publicly accessible server belonging to Level One Robotics, …

Read the full article on Assembly Magazine.

iPhone Chipmaker Races to Recover After Crippling Computer Virus

Taiwan Semiconductor Manufacturing Co., which makes chips for the iPhone and other devices, is recovering from a debilitating computer virus but warned of delayed shipments and reduced revenue because of the impact on its factories.

TSMC said that 80 percent of the fabrication tools affected by a virus outbreak Friday evening had been restored and that it expects full recovery on Monday. …

Read the full article on Bloomberg.

Researchers Develop Audio-Based Method to Detect 3D Printing Cyber-Attacks

Ben-Gurion University of the Negev in Israel researchers has published a study titled “Digital Audio Signature for 3D Printing Integrity”, examining the use of “audio fingerprints” to help detect cyber-attacks on 3D printers.
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Read the full article on All3DP.

Space, the final frontier will need 3D printing to make it happen (Authentise Weekly News-In-Review – Week 83)

The space industry finds itself in the sweet spot of many advanced technologies, hoping to improve mission success by looking at its problems from all sides. 3D printing has already proved to be a powerful tool for these purposes, with its fast iterative cycles and outside-the-box manufacturing paradigm. What Airbus has been doing for its airplanes, Lockheed Martin is pushing beyond with 3D printed parts that can reach sizes just under 4ft, halving production time, costs and reducing weight. Still, it will be extremely expensive to launch humans to Mars or even the Moon in the near future. For that, we’ll have to rely on robots (with much lower maintenance requirements). By sending autonomous robots to another planet, they can be tasked to 3D print sustainable habitats for us in-situ, by sourcing local materials. Empowered by the digital thread, the designs for these habs can be experimented upon and reiterated, and contests are being created periodically to further improve those that, in a not too distant tomorrow, we could call homes.

 

Lockheed Martin 3D printed an impressive titanium dome for satellite fuel tanks

Lockheed Martin has just taken 3D printing to new heights, printing an enormous titanium dome meant for satellite fuel tanks. It’s the largest space part the company has 3D printed to date and measures 46inch  in diameter — just under 4ft.

“Our largest 3D printed parts to date show we’re committed to a future where we produce satellites twice as fast and at half the cost,” said Rick Ambrose, Lockheed Martin Space executive vice president. “And we’re pushing forward for even better results. For example, we shaved off 87% of the schedule to build the domes, reducing the total delivery timeline from two years to three months.”

Read the full article on Digital Trends.

 

Here’s What We Know About The Robots That Might Build Our First Homes on the Moon

Rovers may soon traverse the surface of the Moon yet again. This time, though, they’ll have one noble mission: to build shelter the first human colonizers will inhabit. A team of Japanese scientists is working to make this a reality. They started a company called ispace with the intention of launching a private space mission to the Moon. ispace envisions an entire colony, called “Moon Valley”, constructed not by human astronauts, but by robots instead. And they want to get started on it soon: the team is planning its first mission for late 2019, and a second in 2020.

Read the full article on Futurism.

 

NASA announces winners of competition to design 3D-printed habitat for Mars

NASA announces winners of competition to design 3D-printed habitat for Mars

NASA has selected the five winning designs in the latest stage of its 3D-printed Habitat competition, which include a community of modular pods made from the Martian surface, and a vertical egg-like container. The On-Site Habitat Competition invited groups to design a sustainable shelter for a crew of four astronauts on a mission to Mars, using construction techniques enabled by 3D printing technology.

Read the rest here.

 

Follow us on Twitter to keep updated on AM & IIoT related news as well as updates to Authentise’s services!

Farnborough Airshow – AM on aerospace’s spotlight (Authentise Weekly News-In-Review – Week 82)

Last week, our CEO Andre Wegner attended the Farnborough Airshow. What was presented there represented the very cutting edge of the aerospace industry, contributing to a record-breaking $192B in orders, and what happened behind closed doors was even more exciting.
3D printing featured prominently within its halls, as the technology was shown employed to optimize both the performance of the parts it redesigned and the design/production process itself. The industry is renowned for its tight certification specifications, and this is one of the topics that are closer to the heart of those players who want to be held as trend leaders. The event was the perfect opportunity for companies and collaborations to show their latest 3D printed aircraft parts, like the Norsk Titanium/Pratt & Whitney integrally bladed rotor (IBR) among many others. What are most interesting, however, are the deals and collaborations that have been announced coming from the airshow. An MoU between Oerlikon and RUAD on the development of space components, printers’ deals and material development contracts between GE Additive and Eaton and AP&C, represents just a fraction of the movement the 3D printing industry is displaying.

 

Inside Aerospace AM Certification At Farnborough Airshow 2018

Norsk Titanium 3D printed aft galley brackets on display at Farnborough Airshow 2018. Photo by Beau Jackson

As a high-value, and heavily standardized industry, certification of course is one of the main preoccupations when considering 3D printing in aerospace. In conversations with steel manufacturer and distributor Carpenter Technology, Rapid Plasma Deposition (RPD) company Norsk Titanium and Boeing Horizon X beneficiary Morf3D, I explore this topic a little deeper to underline a picture of the technology’s progress in this heavyweight industry.

Read the full analysis here.

 

Norsk Titanium, Pratt & Whitney, 3D Printed Integrally Bladed Rotor And More Aerospace Announcements

Norsk Titanium, an aerospace additive manufacturing company with headquarters in Norway, alongside a team of aerospace industry specialists, have collaborated to create and test the first additive manufactured integrally bladed rotor (IBR) used within turbine engines. The University of Notre Dame Turbomachinery Laboratory (NDTL), Pratt & Whitney and TURBOCAM International are included in the industry team.

“We are excited to collaborate on these manufacturing and testing efforts and applications for future engine development,” said Dave Carter, Senior Vice President, Engineering, at Pratt & Whitney.

Read the rest of the article here.

 

RUAG and Oerlikon sign 3D printed space components MoU

Oerlikon and RUAG Space have signed a Memorandum of Understanding today during the Farnborough Airshow to qualify and accelerate series production of 3D printed space components. Oerlikon and RUAG Space are already working together on the qualification of a bracket that would be installed on a payload fairing. A new optimised design made possible through additive manufacturing will reduce costs by 25% and decrease weight by more than 50%, while doubling the stiffness of the bracket. The collaboration on the bracket exemplifies the companies’ strong partnership, which will be deepened further through this initiative.

Read more here.

 

Follow us on Twitter to keep updated on AM & IIoT related news as well as updates to Authentise’s services!

 

Newsletter (July) – The new face of Run automation

Improved tools for better print automation

 

We know that there are a lot of opportunities to use data to improve the scheduling workflow in additive manufacturing. We’ve known it since we started.

Now we’re taking the new steps towards that promise.

The first step is to make it easier to select parts. We know what needs to be manufactured, and pretty much everything about it.
That we should be able to pre-select and even sort the parts that need to be manufactured based on the device you’re targeting.
So, in the next week, we’ll be releasing our new run/build page.

RunBuild Page

It’ll let you filter the parts’ list based on the machine that you’ve selected, and default sorts them by “Due Date”. Now all you’ve got to do is to select the parts you want to make, and we’ll make sure they’re properly nested (2D, 3D coming soon), tell you when it’s likely to start, how long it’ll take and how much room you have.

To learn more about our Additive Production Accelerator (APA) and how it can help boost your business, visit our website.

The Road Ahead

That’s just the start. We also wanted to take some time to outline the road ahead. Two improvements that we have squarely in view are:
  • Auto-nesting – We’re working on the ability to give you the most efficient builds based on your part backlog. Since good nesting/packing is usually driven by the computing resources/time available, making a selection and then packing is not the way to go. Instead, our multi-threaded packing approach intends to do this in the background, based on all the part’s features (such as material, workflow, due-date, quality requirements etc) that you’ve entered previously, and iterate through thousands of potential variations before you’ve ever logged on. That way, by the time you do, you have a one-click option to get the most efficient build possible.
  • Machine-code creation – As mentioned last month, moving nested builds directly on to the machine is the next step in automating the workflow. We can achieve that by working with the OEMs to create the build on the fly. That’s also a project we are starting this year, and are looking for partners – especially if you have EOS machines.
If you would like to know more about the new run/build page or the upcoming features we will add, please let us know by contacting our CMO Frank Speck at frank@authentise.com.

Traditional design processes don’t work with AM, so it’s changing (Authentise Weekly News-In-Review – Week 81)

We’ve set up our design process to be efficient and reliable for the tools at our disposal, and with 3D printing, it’s about time to shake it up. 3D printing is inherently different from traditional manufacturing techniques and, to explore its true potential, we need to rely on design tools that help us explore new directions. Sandia Labs argues that this technology doesn’t plug easily into established production methodologies, both in terms of speed and how the variables involved impact the parts. The different features of a 3D printed part are a challenge for precision manufacturing lines. Apart from industrial compatibility issues, to see where we can push 3D printing we need to think outside the box. Concepts like 4D manufacturing help us envision what we can achieve with the technology, with parts that react to temperature, light or mechanical changes. This is nothing new in and of itself, but it’s been explored through 3D printing and it’s empowered design capabilities. We are already on the right track to reinvent the design process through smart digital tools, like generative design and quick iterative cycles, and the future looks exciting.

Sandia Labs Focused on Optimizing Design for 3D Printing

3D printing is capable of streamlining both design and production processes, but most designers (and many design tools) aren’t really prepared to take advantage of the design possibilities the technology presents. Traditional design methods applied to additive manufacturing don’t necessarily lead to fully optimized designs. Sandia National Laboratories’ Laboratory Directed Research and Development project hopes to point the industry in the right direction.

According to Sandia, the project focused on “how to put less precise 3D printed parts together with precise tools, taking advantage of the rapid prototyping, design and manufacturing possible with additive manufacturing.”

Read the full article here.

MIT engineers create 3D-printed magnetic shape-shifters

Engineers from MIT have designed soft, 3D-printed structures that can transform their shape “almost instantaneously” with the wave of a magnet. The magnetically manipulated objects are made using a type of 3D-printable ink developed by researchers at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), which has been infused with tiny magnetic particles.

Read the rest here.

Autodesk University: How is Generative Design used Within Additive Manufacturing?

With a keenness to learn more about how design processes can affect AM end-production, 3D Printing Industry attended Autodesk University’s industrial talk entitled “Generative Design: Past, Present, and Future”. This lecture was led by Autodesk’s Principal Technical Consultant Andrew Harris and Allin Groom a Research Engineer at Autodesk.

Read more at 3D Printing Industry.

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How to fund Digital Manufacturing? (Authentise Weekly News-In-Review – Week 80)

Funds like Atomico are already forming a portfolio of startups poised to disrupt many verticals through IIoT, robotics and AI, and they are showing excitement for the future as well. There is tremendous value to be created through digital startups, many of which take on daunting challenges. The aptly named Automation Everywhere wants to bring, you guessed it, automation to any mundane human task, both physically and digitally, and has just raised $1.8 billion valuation. Similarly, company Katerra wants to reinvent how the construction industry is structured and has already raised $865 million in venture capital. But is Venture Capital really the right way to fund a B2B industry with slow sales? The fact that Automation Everywhere waited 15 years to raise its first funding, and Katerra is backed with $865m from Softbank indicates maybe not. Maybe more patient private capital, or even public markets – with their more limited growth objectives – are the right source of funding. Foxconn backing Andrew Ng, while Flex has backed ex-Autodesk CEO Carl Bass with $200m indicates it may be so. Our prediction: We’ll see a lot more interesting funding mechanisms in this industry going forward.

Data, AI & Robots: Atomico’s Take on Industry 4.0

Inexpensive sensors, cheap wireless communications infrastructure, highly scalable cloud-based data processing and novel machine learning methods have converged to a point where the building blocks are in place for a new Machine Age. Venture capital investment in internet-of-things in Industry (the decidedly ugly-sounding “IIoT”) is at an all time high, according to a CB Insights report on the topic, with over $1bn invested in Q4 2017 alone.

Read the full article at Medium.

Silicon Valley company that automates ‘mundane’ tasks with robots gets nearly $2 billion valuation

A Silicon Valley company that uses bots to automate certain tasks previously done by human workers has reached a $1.8 billion valuation with a new fundraising from several companies, including Goldman Sachs. San Jose, California-headquartered Automation Anywhere this week announced a $250 million round of fundraising — its first round of outside funding despite being in business for 15 years.

Read the rest here.

Can Silicon Valley Disrupt How We Build?

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Katerra announced that it had acquired Michael Green Architecture, a 25-person architecture firm in Vancouver, British Columbia. On June 12, the company revealed that it had bought another, larger architecture firm, Atlanta-based Lord Aeck Sargent. This comes five months after Katerra raised $865 million in venture capital from funders led by SoftBank’s Vision Fund, which has also invested heavily in the co-working startup WeWork. “The construction industry is ripe for digital disruption,” said co-founder and chairman Michael Marks in a press release. “This new round of funding will enable us to further invest in R&D and continue to scale the business.”

Read the full article here.

 

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3D Printing is the framework for tomorrow’s manufacturing (Authentise Weekly News-In-Review – Week 79)

When planning the facilities of the future, 3D printing is now being cited among the top 3 manufacturing tools to deploy. Not only that, entirely new production pipelines are being developed to really crank up productivity through this medium, while still fully exploiting what makes 3D printing so unique. When you take a company like Boeing, which is starting to envision a near future where 3D printing enables customizable cabin interiors, of course they’ll still want to serialize part production as much as possible, to minimize production time and resource logistics. This is the reasoning behind the new EV production plant in Shanghai, which will be planned revolving around the 3D printed car framework from Divergent3D. Logistically, 3D printing enables a much nimbler pipeline, with agile manufacturing capabilities that will have a huge impact on the industry and the network of capillary infrastructures that are still based on last century thinking.

 

Boeing expects 3D printing to help airlines customize cabin interiors

Boeing is investing heavily in developing its additive manufacturing capabilities ahead of an expected increase in the number of applications for 3D printed commercial aircraft parts. The airframer already incorporates additive manufactured components into various aircraft cabin products, and expects the technology to provide airlines with a new way of customizing their interiors in the future.

Check out the full article here.

 

Shanghai Commits To Divergent 3D Printed Electric Vehicle Production

The Divergent 3D node-based additive manufacturing technology used to make the Blade supercar is to be the driver of a new electric vehicle (EV) production plant in Shanghai. The forthcoming factory is a joint development between EV investment firm We Solutions, and Shanghai Alliance Investment, a private equity and venture capital arm of Shanghai Municipal Government.

“It will only be a matter of time before policies come out stating that old vehicles have to be abolished. As a result we have to get ready, not only for the EV industry but for the world’s largest automovile industry. That’s why we’re entering the market.” says Eric Ho King-fung, chairman of We Solutions in an article for the South China Morning Post.

Read the article here.

Follow us on Twitter to keep updated on AM & IIoT related news as well as updates to Authentise’s services!

Is 3D printing reinventing the automotive assembly line? (Authentise Weekly News-In-Review – Week 78)

Henry Ford was the first to envision a streamlined way of bringing quality automobiles to market. The idea behind his revolutionary vision was that technology enabled his workers to optimize their activities. That philosophy is still alive and well in the automotive industry and now, thanks to 3D printing, it’s experiencing a renewed sense of discovery. Currently, companies like Audi and GM are employing 3D printing to help speed up the design and prototyping cycle cutting lead times by more than 50% and saving over $300K on tooling. The bravest (or those with the most resources) are pushing 3D printing towards new applications and wild concepts for the cars of the future.

General Motors Saves $300,000 By Switching To 3D Printed Tooling

Zane Meike holds sample 3D printed tool at the Lansing Delta Township assembly plant in Michigan. Photo by Michael Wayland/Automotive News

The Lansing Delta Township assembly plant of American multinational vehicle manufacturer General Motors has reported an expected cost saving of over $300,000 since it acquired a 3D printer three years ago. Driving forward its 3D printing efforts, the plant eventually expects to create annual cost savings in the millions of dollars.

Read the full article here.

Shanghai Commits To Divergent 3D Printed Electric Vehicle Production

The Divergent 3D node-based additive manufacturing technology, used to make the Blade supercar, is to be the driver of a new electric vehicle (EV) production plant in Shanghai.

“The EV market in China is at an inflection point, with unparalleled growth in demand and government policy stimulus,” says Eric Ho King-fung, chairman of We Solutions in an article for the South China Morning Post.

Check out the rest of the article here.

MIT’s 3D-printed inflatables could shape the interiors of cars in the future

Car interiors could morph into different configurations at the flick of a switch, using 3D-printed inflatable structures developed by researchers at the MIT. The Self-Assembly Lab at MIT worked with BMW on the project, called Liquid Printed Pneumatics. The result is a stretchy, inflatable silicone prototype that can take on a number of different shapes depending on the level of air pressure inside. If turned into a car seat, it could quickly be tuned to different positions, or levels of springiness depending on user preference.

Read the rest at Dezeen.

Follow us on Twitter to keep updated on AM & IIoT related news as well as updates to Authentise’s services!