Bolstering, and Innovating, Local Manufacturing (Authentise Weekly News-In-Review – Week 08)

Hello everyone and welcome to another edition of the weekly News-In-Review, brought to you by Authentise!

There are quite a few factors that contribute to AM’s status as king of the hill of advanced manufacturing processes. By the very nature of AM, manufacturing is becoming decentralized, democratized and is opening doors to new industrial workflows, much more efficient and smart than before. This allows countries to diminish retain manufacturing (and the added value) locally, industrializing their economy (as IMTS’ development of India’s first jet engine). Integrating and developing new manufacturing paradigms like AM will create competitive advantages (as Russia is doing in 3D printed construction), jobs and invigorate the local industrial scene, and enable a greener and more material-efficient economic model (as the UK’s Green Alliance points out).

Here are just a few examples. Let’s take a look.

Intech DMLS developing “India’s first jet engine”

Intech DMLS, a metal additive manufacturing company from India, have announced the development of the country’s first jet engine series. […] the MJE20 engine starts small, powering unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) and remote-controlled aircraft. According to the Times of India, this will make them the first Asian country to develop an indigenous jet engine.

Read more here.

3D printing construction company Apis Cor prints 37 m2 house near Moscow, plans global expansion

Apis Cor, an additive manufacturing construction company based in San Francisco and the Russian cities of Moscow and Irkutsk, has used its own construction 3D printer to build a 3D printed house in Stupino, near Moscow. Construction of the 37m2 building took less than a day. “We are people,” Apis Cor says. “Engineers, managers, builders, and inventors sharing one common idea—to change the construction industry so that millions of people will have an opportunity to improve their living conditions.”

Read more about this ambitious project here.

3D Printing and the Green Economy

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3D printing may play a role in creating a more resource-efficient economy in the UK according to a new study conducted by Green Alliance, a British think tank.
The study, “Getting it Right from the Start: Developing a Circular Economy for Novel Materials,” posits that using new materials and designing for recycling could lower manufacturing costs in Great Britain. The study was conducted for Innovate UK, the High-Value Manufacturing Catapult and the Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council. The use of carbon fiber, bioplastics and 3D printing technologies can create parts and products that are even more durable than those that use plastics created from fossil fuels. These technologies could also enable new, more eco-friendly business models and product lifecycles.

 

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Redifining Medical Customizability (Authentise Weekly News-In-Review – Week 07)

Hi all and welcome to week 6 of Authentise News-In-Review!

This week we are going to talk about customization for medical applications. AM’s freedom of design makes this one of technology’s core benefits, but nowhere is this more true than in the medical arena. We’ve long heard about custom prosthetics but it can go much further than that. Personalized medicine is taking giant steps to practicality thanks to AM and new “bioinks” are enabling new treatments that could mould to specific patients’ scenarios, like dodging intolerances or adding particular vitamin supplements. Laboratories can study diseases in custom made samples thanks to 3D printing’s power to change design, physical properties and materials on the designer’s whim.

Let’s dive in.

A new 3D bioink for PolyJet 3D printed pills

Researchers at the University of California in Los Angeles (UCLA) have developed a viable bioink for 3D printed pills.  In this study, Giovanny Acosta-Vélez, Chase Linsley, Madison Craig and Benjamin Wu favour the inkjet technique over other 3D printing technologies for its speed and ability to print at room temperature. The temperate environment ensures that active pharmaceutical ingredients (APIs) aren’t damaged in the process, and speed is of course preferable for mass production. The 3D printable bioink from UCL is made from hyaluronic acid – a key ingredient in skin, connective tissues and the nervous system. A photoinitator is added to the acid so that it solidifies when in contact with light. This mixture is used to fill preformed tablets displaying the properties of an atypical oral tablet.

Read the full article here.

Porous 3D printed scaffolds help Rice University scientists tackle bone cancer

Scientists at Rice University in Houston have used 3D printing to create porous, bone-like scaffolds that can be used to study bone cancer tumors. They found that the size and orientation of individual pores affected how cells proliferate in the absence of blood. According to bioengineer Antonios Mikos, the 3D printed polymer bone scaffold contains artificial pores that constrain the flow of fluid and apply shear stress to tumor cells […] The scientists believe that this model could be vital for finding out more about bone cancer and potential treatments: “We aim to develop tumor models that can capture the complexity of tumors in vitro and can be used for drug testing, thus providing a platform for drug development while reducing the associated cost,” Mikos said.

Read the full article here.

3D Printing the Future of Surgery

One of the most hotly anticipated areas for 3D printing to impact is medicine. A myriad of stories have appeared pointing to all manner of exciting innovations in the medical field. Sadly many of the “3D printed ear/nose/heart/ etc.” stories have been rather disingenuous or are at the very least very optimistic. To give you a more accurate view of the possibilities of 3D printing in medicine we’ll look at one particular area: surgery.

Read how AM is and will transform the surgical world on 3DPrint.

 

As always, don’t forget to follow us on Twitter to receive more news that don’t make the cut to the weekly report and come back next week for another News-In-Review!

Authentise Supports Roundtable on Process Automation @ AMUG 2017

We’re super excited to be a part of AMUG 2017, both as exhibitors and contributors. It’s always a great show.

The roundtable is titled “Identifying & Solving Process Inefficiencies in AM”. The idea is to bring together a number of experts in polymer, metal and hybrid production who all have challenges as well as ticks and tricks about how to improve the process. This is a chance to exchange ideas. There is no panel, but we are ensuring active participation at the event by making sure that certain experienced professionals will be there to share ideas.

We’re really excited to be working with Peter Zelinski, the Editor-in-Chief of the Additive Manufacturing magazine, who will moderate the session. He wants to speak to as many professionals in advance as possible. Are you one of them? Get in touch.

Time: Monday March 20, 3:30-4:30.
Room: Continental B (Lobby Level)
Content: This roundtable explores what inefficiencies additive manufacturing operations still exist and how they can be addressed. As additive technology enables more and more production use cases, it is becoming increasingly important improve the process: To reduce the latency of bringing a part to print, integrate the production into existing manufacturing processes, and eliminate manual steps from the process of preparing and making perfect parts, reliably. Nobody seems more excited or prepared to make this transition happen than operators, who have had to struggle with inefficiencies for decades. This roundtable taps that knowledge and helps exchange ideas of how manual processes can be automated and sidestepped. How to add serial numbers automatically, create cost benchmarks, know what is scheduled where, when the next available slot is, track traceability automatically and more

 

Big Data to tackle Big Problems (Authentise Weekly News-In-Review – Week 06)

Hi and welcome to another edition of the News-In-Review, brought to you by Authentise!

The computational power at our disposal is increasing exponentially, being that of the phone in our pockets or the super-computer of the country next door. In our interconnected world, data is engulfing everything (as highlighted in our Week 3 edition). This week we propose how the two are coming together to address the great problems in our world, from national resource management to safer and more accurate than ever 3D printing. As IIoT is embedded in the national grid, it’s changing from a rigid, failure prone network to an efficient, system optimized in real time approach thanks to data-driven analytics. Processing that data requires new IT innovations, such as the first exascale super-computer now built in Chian. This, previously unattainable computational power allows us to simulate better 3D printing designs, materials and processes and can be used to unlock more AM use cases, such as construction.

As ever, there’s a lot to cover here. Let’s jump in!

Big Water – Big Data Is Reshaping The Water Industry

Data management, exploratory analytics, data visualization and predictive algorithms enable the discovery of important behavioral characteristics of highly‐complex urban infrastructure. Water management relies on heavy physical infrastructure and reactive administration. This changes with the development of cyber-physical systems, real-time monitoring, big data analysis and predictive machine learning algorithms and the IoT. These systems enable a transition from reacting to optimized, proactive and cost-efficient management processes.

Check out the full article here.

World’s First Exascale Supercomputer to Enhance 3D Printing Capabilities

The Tianhe-2 Super Computer

China’s National Supercomputer Centre announced that the prototype for its exascale supercomputer will be completed later this year, ahead of its initial date in 2018. The successful performance and commercialization of the computer is presumed to drastically improve existing 3D printing or additive manufacturing methods. […] Through the usage of an exascale computing-based application, manufacturers will be able to use additive manufacturing technologies to better simulate end products and significantly optimize processes before the last stage of manufacturing.

Read the full article here.

Building by numbers: how 3D printing is shaking up the construction industry

Stewart Williams [admits] that quality control represents a major challenge [to the building industry]. To be viable, any printed building technique will have systems that can constantly monitor and inspect the materials as they are being produced. As he notes wryly: “You wouldn’t want to build a massive beam and get to the end and find you’ve got some holes in it.” Assuming regulators can be convinced, the potential upsides of 3D printing for the construction industry could be huge. Among the factors in the technology’s favor are productivity gains, reduced labor costs and safer working environments, as well as the sort of one-off, complex building designs that are not technically and economically feasible at present.

Read the whole article at the Guardian.

 

As always, be sure to follow us on Twitter to get the rest of the juicy news we share and come back next week to another edition of the News-In-Review!

Getting AM primed for industies through collaborations (Authentise Weekly News-In-Review – Week 05)

Hello to all our good readers, welcome to 2017th fifth weekly News-In-Review!

From our insider’s vantage point we’ve observed for some time how AM is getting geared up for the performance standards of industrial deployment. The steady process of refinement of the various technologies in the 3D printing world has been possible thanks to the ongoing host of collaborations and projects that helped tackle the issues AM still faces. We could not get a better example that this week’s numerous news on the topic:

Audi has announced a partnership with EOS to integrate AM in their business and, at the same time, McLaren sings a similar partnership with Stratasys to bring AM-enabled car components to the F1 track. The fruits of one such collaboration are already ripe for Airbus, which has been in the testing stage with Sciaky for quite some time and is now ready to implement the latter’s huge EBAM printer in their aircraft manufacturing process. To note there is also Lloyd’s Register Energy and TWI who launched two collaborative global projects which will help the international community identify the technological standards needed for AM to scale to the industrial setting.

If it looks like a lot to cover it’s because it is! So, without further ado, let’s dig in.

 

Audi announce partnership with German 3D printing company EOS

Automotive manufacturer Audi has announced a new partnership agreement with fellow German company, 3D printer manufacturers EOS. The use of additive manufacturing will be used for, “equipment and prototype building at Audi, as well as motor sports, where the technology is already in use today.” Güngör Kara, Director of Global Application and Consulting at EOS, explained how the agreement will move Audi forward: “The aim is to not only supply Audi with the right additive systems and processes but to also support them during applications development, when building up internal AM knowledge and training their engineers to become in-house AM experts.”

Read more about the partnership here.

Stratasys Signs Four-Year Partnership with McLaren Racing as Official Supplier of 3D Printing Solutions

John Cooper, Commercial and Finance Director, McLaren Racing (l) and Ilan Levin, Stratasys CEO (r)

[Stratasys] is going to the races: to bring additive manufacturing to the track, it has announced a new four-year partnership with McLaren Racing. Stratasys will work as the Official Supplier of 3D Printing Solutions to the McLaren Honda Formula 1 team, and provide the team with additive manufacturing and 3D printing solutions. The company will assist the Formula 1 team in elevating its capacity for rapid manufacturing at the McLaren Technology Center in Woking, UK. In a way, Stratasys will operate as a 3D printing pit crew for McLaren Racing.

Read the full article here.

Airbus To 3-D Print Airframe Structures

Airbus is installing a large additive manufacturing machine [Sciaky‘s EBAM 110] at a production site in France to 3D print titanium aircraft structural parts for its aircraft. [John O’Hara, director of global sales] says the qualification work completed so far shows EBAM can produce components that meet or exceed the properties of forged parts. Printing rather than forging these parts avoids the long lead times and the waste of expensive metal involved in machining finished parts from forgings. With its high deposition rates, the wire-fed EBAM can produce parts in hours or days, versus weeks or months, he says. “We provided thousands of pounds to Airbus before the deal was signed,” O’Hara reiterates. “They know where this is going.”

Read more about it here (registration needed).

Lloyd’s Register Energy Partners with TWI to Launch Two Collaborative Global Projects Focused on Industrial Additive Manufacturing Challenges

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[Lloyd’s Register Energy (LR)] has teamed up with leading research and technology organization The Welding Institute (TWI) to launch two new collaborative projects that will help companies more fully integrate additive manufacturing. The first of LR and TWI’s new projects, “Achieving Regulatory and Code Compliance for Additive Manufacturing,” will “investigate the routes to regulatory compliance of parts selected by project sponsors, and will produce data and assessment criteria for the introduction and acceptance of parts through third-party inspection.”

Read more about the project at 3DPrint.

 

Don’t forget to follow us on Twitter and come back next week for another edition of News-In-Review!

IIoT engulfs the world, is the world ready? (Authentise Weekly News-In-Review – Week 04)

Hi everyone and welcome to this new edition of your weekly News-In-Review by Authentise!

We are switching the release date to Sunday from now on so tune in every weekend to get your curated news report.

This week we filled our feeds with news coming from the IIoT world. More & more resources are poured by industrial players to get ahead in the race to ride the sensor-empowered wave of IIoT but there is more to do hiding in the avalanche of data that is coming out of it. While Frankfurt showcases industry 4.0 in its privileged spot as Europe’s main internet hub and key players’ collaborations take the IIoT ecosystem up a notch, the data shows early adopters can’t seem to create actionable insights out of it all. As IIoT engulfs the industrial world in data, smart process development driven by analytics is key to make use of the incredible information capacity in our hands.

Frankfurt factory showcases Industry 4.0

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Frankfurt is the world’s largest internet hub – and with volume doubling every year, companies are turning to the latest technology. That was the starting point for one German company – which has built a factory to show what’s possible.

Click here to see the article and video.

Honeywell and Aeron collaborate

Honeywell has announced that it will collaborate with Aereon on solutions to help industrial customers boost the safety, efficiency and reliability of their operations by leveraging Honeywell’s Industrial Internet of Things (IIoT) ecosystem. The INspire™ ecosystem is a part of Honeywell’s Connected Plant initiative, which helps manufacturers leverage the IIoT to improve the safety, efficiency and reliability of operations across a single plant or several plants within an enterprise. Honeywell and its ecosystem partners are developing infrastructure that offers customers secure methods to capture and aggregate data, and apply advanced analytics. Customers can then use this information to determine methods to reduce or eliminate manufacturing upsets and inefficiencies.

Click here to read more about the collaboration.

Making Sense of IIoT Analytics

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As the Industrial Internet of Things (IIoT) picks up steam, attention is pivoting from connectivity to analytics, flooding manufacturers with a wave of new offerings that all promise to facilitate real business change. […] “It’s really easy to capture data, but to then make that data actionable is where companies are really struggling,” notes Ryan Lester, director of IoT strategy for Xively, an IoT platform provider. “Companies don’t have the right analytics tools to parse through the data and they don’t have access to good algorithms to get insights.” In fact, according to research by Forrester and Xively, 51% of companies are collecting data from connected products, but only 33% are leveraging the intelligence to create actionable insights.

Click here to know more of IIoT analytics.

 

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Facing New Dynamics With Technology (Authentise Weekly News-In-Review – Week 03)

Hi and welcome to another edition of the News-In-Review!

On the eve of President-elect Trump’s inauguration, dozens of companies are announcing that they are keeping manufacturing jobs in the US, creating them, or bringing it back: Ford, Alibaba, and Amazon among them. In fact, this is a long term trend: We highlighted a FastCompany article that revealed that apparel manufacturing in the US went up by 35% since 2009. But why? It’s not because customers are expecting improved personalization options (they’re not really), and it doesn’t seem to be about taking advantage of new technologies such as 3D printing. Instead, we think it’s the need to stay agile to consumer needs, and that’s best done by empowering your operators with the new opportunities cloud+data provide. Read our CEO’s latest LinkedIn post below and find out more.

The Uneasy Truth Behind Amazon’s Hiring Blitz And What Startups Are Doing To Fix It

Today, Amazon announced that it will create 100,000 full-time, full-benefit jobs in the United States over the next 18 months. The jobs, Amazon says, will range from entry-level positions to software development roles. The announcement is designed to play nicely into President-elect Trump’s rhetoric about bringing more jobs back to our shores, but it’s important to remember that Amazon’s business model is premised on increasing automation wherever possible, which means replacing more and more humans with machines.

Read the full article at FastCompany.

The dream of Ara: Inside the rise and fall of the world’s most revolutionary phone

In a very personal and thorough recollection of the bold project of modular phone Ara we get a glimpse into how AM was scrapped from the manufacturing plans. “[Paul] Eremenko cut ties with one of Ara’s earliest supporters, 3DSystems, scrapping the project’s dependence on rapid 3D printing for a dye sublimation process. 3DSystems’ printers were too slow, and the new system could adorn modules with selfies and pets.”

Read the full story here.

Trust your People.

People who run manufacturing, sales, logistics or many other core functions in supply chain know how important their team members are: How much they know, how many ideas they have to drive more efficient operations – yet how they have long been stifled by rules, ignored by managers and brushed aside by support staff. No wonder people become demoralised. Modern software tools should be providing relief. Alas, the most recent industrial IoT examples such as GE’s Predix show that this trend looks set to continue. Data Scientists lead IoT projects that get the data to tell them where the problems are rather than asking the people on the front line what stops them from being better at their job. Their findings are enshrined in IT systems as rules not to be tampered with. IIoT is the buzzword, but we are not sure that people are looking at it the right way.

Read the full article on LinkedIn.

 

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CES 2017 (Authentise Weekly News-In-Review – Week 02)

Hello and welcome to another edition of News-in-Review!

This week was evidently dominated by one of the biggest shows of the year, CES2017 and with it came a host of awesome additions to AM’s portfolio, as well as our presence in an industrial 3D printing panel!

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Photo courtesy of Adam Jones.

In this edition tagged #CES2017, we present to you new printers and AI powered online AM tools: Autodesk and Titan Robotics team up to enable large build 3D printing with the efficiency of 5 printing heads. a “crazy” printing tech behind Markforged’s new printer allows it to print metal all for $90K and Sculpteo brings AI-powered analysis and evaluation to online metal AM projects.

We got your attention? Let’s go.

CES2017: Really Fast 3D Printing for Large Builds

About a year ago, Autodesk showed off one of the most innovative filament printers in recent memory. Project Escher is your basic Cartesian filament printer, but with a twist: it has five heads. These print heads work together to build large objects very quickly. Autodesk open sourced the design of the Escher, and now it’s made it into commercial production thanks to Titan Robotics. The Cronus, which uses the same software as Project Escher, is big! Each of these gantries is driven by closed-loop servo motors and fancy ball screws, producing a total build volume of 77″x30″x20″.

Read more about it here.

The Markforged Metal X Prints Real Metal Parts

At CES 2017 today Markforged have announced what might be a revolution in 3D printing, a desktop metal 3D printer called the Metal X. […] The secret to bringing 3D metal printing to the desktop is the Atomic Diffusion Additive Manufacturing (ADAM) process. According to the company this creates, “a part using a bound metal powder rod that transforms into a dense metal part in one easy step. Bulk sintering provides crystal growth through all axes giving your parts excellent mechanical properties in all directions.”

Read more about the printer here.

Sculpteo Brings Artificial Intelligence to Metal Additive Manufacturing with Agile Metal Technology

[Sculpteo is] bringing artificial intelligence to metal 3D printing. They just unveiled Agile Metal Technology, an online agent-based system used to help designers and manufacturers analyze and evaluate metal additive manufacturing projects. […] Their new Agile Metal Technology is very versatile, with the ability to automate complex procedures, locate and correct problems, find the “best fit” processes and techniques, and even offer recommendations on how to optimize design elements like lattices and supports.

Read the full article here.

 

That’s is it for this week, be sure to follow us on Twitter to get more juicy news and those that are not included in the News-In-Review!

Enabling Research Through AM (Authentise Weekly News-In-Review – Week 01)

Hi everyone, welcome back to the new year with a more weekly 3D printing news from Authentise!

Through AM scientists are able to go where traditional manufacturing simply couldn’t take them. NASA is keeping up the pace for the entirely 3D printed rocket by testing more and more components up for the challenge, ROSCOSMOS is planning to add a bioprinter to the ISS’s arsenal and test it at microgravity and, while we’re at it, stem cell research is getting a boost from 3D printing’s ability to create cartilage’s structures.

Are you aching for your daily fix of science with a side of AM? Let’s dig in.

NASA Engineers Test Combustion Chamber to Advance 3-D Printed Rocket Engine Design

Recent tests of a developmental rocket engine at NASA‘s Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Alabama, produced all the performance data engineers were hoping for, along with the traditional fire and roar. But this engine is anything but traditional. Marshall engineers are designing each of the components from scratch to ultimately be made entirely by AM methods …The series of 12 test firings in late fall brought them a big step closer to that goal, said Andrew Hanks, test lead for the project. The fuel turbopump, fuel injector, valves and other major engine components used in the tests were 3D printed, with the exception of the main combustion chamber.

Read more of these test firings at NASA.

 

Russian space agency Roscosmos to 3D print living tissue on ISS

Russian scientists are planning to install and operate a 3D bioprinter aboard the ISS, according to an official source. They believe that microgravity conditions could actually improve the bioprinting process. […] They believe that significant progress in bioprinting can be achieved by placing equipment in microgravity conditions, since the lack of gravity could potentially help to keep deposited cells in place.

Read the full article here.

Scientists Are Creating New Ears With 3D-Printing and Human Stem Cells

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Inspired by the earmouse, doctors at the University of California at Los Angeles and the University of Edinburgh’s Centre for Regenerative Medicine have perfected a new technique to grow a fully formed human ear, using patients’ own stem cells. They begin with a 3D printed polymer mold of an ear, which is then implanted with stem cells drawn from fat. As these stem cells differentiate into cartilage, the polymer scaffold degrades, leaving a full “ear” made of mature cartilage cells. The new approach could “change all aspects of surgical care,” says Dr. Ken Stewart, one of the researchers and a plastic surgeon at the Royal Hospital for Sick Children.

Read the whole article at Smithsonian.

 

More next week

Integrating the Future & the Present (Authentise Weekly 3D News Review – Week 51)

Hi all, welcome to another (festive!) edition of the weekly review by Authentise!

We hope you had a merry Christmas time! As we go back to our usual day-to-day, we gathered last week’s juiciest 3D news. Many companies are tackling the issues of integrating their work on new tech into present standards and workflows. Sounds like Organovo’s work on pre-clinical bioprinting is finally getting there, Oas are standards for AM enabled medical. Other times industrialization doesnt need to be so complicated: IIoT allows smaller, incremental steps to be taken to integrate new tech and practices to benefit businesses.

Let’s dig in.

Organovo 3D bioprinted liver tissue could make it to the FDA by 2019

Organovo demonstrate toxicity testing with ExVive liver product. Image via Organovo

Speculation on 3D printed tissue coming to humans sooner than we think is backed by new pre-clinical findings from 3D bioprinting company Organovo. Though it will still be 3–5 years before the U.S. based Organovo apply for clearance of their liver tissue, that is still sooner than perhaps even the FDA had in mind. Pre-clinical trial data shows that 3D bioprinted liver tissue has been successfully planted into lab-bred mice. The human liver-cell tissue shows regular functionality and, at this stage, is being explored as a suitable patch for the organ.

Read more at 3D Printing Industry.

3D Printing Production Medical Devices — Pitfalls And Best Practices

In May 2016, the FDA released a draft guidance titled Technical Considerations for Additive Manufactured Devices. Any manufacturer or organization considering 3D-printed components during the development of a medical device should refer to this document. The guidance goes into detail regarding risk and other considerations related to 3D printing, as well as how to employ 3D printing within device development.

Read the article here and the FDA guidance here.

Use Existing Data to Optimize IIoT Sensor Deployment

It is hard to know where to start [in IIoT], and whether the solution being designed will be palatable to the end customer in terms of function and price. Rather than ordering highly marketed solutions from outside the enterprise and “tipping” consultants with exorbitant fees, they can find ingredients that are already on hand, apply basic analytics, and come up with some surprisingly tasty ways to translate raw data into process information to improve maintenance or business decisions.

Read about the useful, and easy, ways IIoT can easily be integrated in your business here.

 

We hope to see you next week for another edition brought to you by Authentise!