Autonomous robots: its more than just driving (Authentise Weekly News-In-Review – Week 50)

When you say autonomous one most commonly thinks of self-driving cars. Nonetheless, the movement to make robots survey and act on their own precedes driving around no-hands. Autonomous robots have the ability to adapt to various scenarios within their scope of purpose and, as such, are being developed for a host of different applications. What is largely proceeding out of the spotlight is an ever-increasing presence within plants and other work environments of robots that are providing the tendrils for the factory-wide brain of the IIoT. These robots can sense their environment, be in constant and instantaneous exchange of information with central processing systems and execute complex directives, managing the necessary sub-steps on their own. Adidas has created a factory that uses autonomous robots to drive on-demand sneaker production. Menial tasks can be done effortlessly and efficiently by robots that, through machine vision, can see and analyze their targets and act according to their AI directives. This is why Château Clerc Milon, renowned wine producer, has implemented robots to take care of vineyards. Autonomous robots are perfect for scenarios in which unfaltering machine vision and pattern recognition enable them to see what the human eye wouldn’t catch. Like for rediscovering long-lost ’50s prototype jet fighters out in the ocean.

Inside Adidas’ Robot-Powered, On-Demand Sneaker Factory

Called Speedfactory, the facility would pair a small human workforce with technologies including 3-D printing, robotic arms, and computerized knitting to make running shoes—items that are more typically mass-produced by workers in far-off countries like China, Indonesia, and Vietnam.

“What we enable is speed,” said Gerd Manz, vice president of Adidas’ innovation group. “We can react to consumer needs within days.”

Read the full article at Wired.

Bordeaux: Robot vineyard worker impresses at Clerc Milon

robot vineyard worker

Château Clerc Milon, under the same ownership as Château Mouton Rothschild in Pauillac, has tested a prototype vineyard robot named ‘Ted’ to help with soil cultivation and weeding in its vines.

Baron Philippe de Rothschild’s MD, Philippe Dhalluin, said, ‘We see robotics as an effective solution for the future.

‘As well as helping to make our vineyard work less arduous and respecting the soil, it will reduce our dependency on fossil energies and the harm caused by traditional agricultural machinery.’

Read more here.

Autonomous sub finds long-lost supersonic aircraft from the 50s

The "Raise the Arrow" team gathers for a photo behind the AUV

Fraunhofer is reporting that one of its DEDAVEs [unmanned submersible] has located a couple of sunken flight models of a famous Canadian jet fighter, the Avro Arrow. Billed as “the world’s first autonomous underwater vehicle [AUV] to be developed from the outset with a view to series production,” the DEDAVE is designed to be easily manufactured on an assembly line, and thus relatively inexpensive to buy. At less than 700 kg it’s also quite light for an AUV and can travel autonomously for up to 20 hours on one charge of its eight batteries, diving to a maximum depth of 6,000 meters.

Read more about the discovery here.

 

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Automation: adapt or disrupt? (Authentise Weekly News-In-Review – Week 49)

Automation technologies are starting to take hold in many environments of our daily lives. It’s not just the factory floor, the whole world is getting permeated by tech that makes short work of menial tasks. But how is this changing the way we think about these spaces? The factories of the future are often envisioned as highly technical spaces, with every nook and cranny tailored to the task at hand, aimed at making it easiest for the robots in place to do their jobs. However, most advanced automation technologies at our disposal are capable of navigating complex environments, react according to outside stimuli and thus safely traverse almost any workspace they find themselves in. Cobots (collaborative robots), autonomous vehicles or even Amazon warehouse handling and dispatch robots are perfect examples of this. The interesting dichotomy here is in how we can optimally plan spaces, public, private or industrial, to drive performance and flexibility. Does flexibility go in the way of peak performance layout? Or are intelligent, adaptable systems going to be the best option to keep operations agile?

 

The checkout line’s death knell


We’re all only about ten years away from sauntering into stores, grabbing whatever it is we want, then quick-stepping out like we stole it. It’ll be possible because many shops will be ringed with machine vision-enabling cameras and sensors that keep tabs on what you take while inside and then charge it to the corresponding app as you leave.

Read the full article (and watch the great video!) here.

 

Walmart is ‘secretly’ testing self-driving floor scrubbers, signaling that more robots are coming

floors scr

Walmart has been quietly testing out autonomous floor scrubbers during the overnight shifts in five store locations near the company’s headquarters in Bentonville, Arkansas. A spokesperson for Walmart told FOX Business that the move, which was first reported by LinkedIn, is a “very small proof of concept pilot that we are running” and that the company still has a lot more to learn about how this technology “might work best in our different retail locations.”

Read the full article here.

 

Cities Should Not Design for Autonomous Vehicles

Autonomous cars are likely to be better off relying on each other than on fixed infrastructure. As autonomous vehicles capture a larger share of road traffic, they will be able to crowdsource extremely-detailed, real-time maps of urban roads. Each member of the network will benefit from the information provided by other vehicles and would likely provide its own data in exchange for access.

Read the full article here.

 

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Approaching the Modernization of Manufacturing (Authentise Weekly News-In-Review – Week 48)

Upgrading to better standards and technologies is becoming easier than ever thanks to their decentralized and scalable nature, giving the opportunity to improve by gradual implementation and testing. There are many avenues of experimentation to consider. IIoT applications can be implemented as small, self-contained units, providing their own power and relaying sensible information where the most valuable data is to be found with a very small investment. Incorporating AM capabilities allows businesses to underpin numerous steps of traditional part production and logistics, assessing ROI that is clear from the start. However, the right software can sometimes be enough to jumpstart operational efficiency immensely, by automating and analyzing machine data with little effort and investment. Authentise very recently started integration of SLM machines data into its 3Diax platform. The digital age of manufacturing enables future-oriented actions to be taken at any business leisure.

Powering The IIoT With Industrial Grade Solar/Li-Ion Hybrids

[Small photovoltaic (PV panels) in combination with Lithium-ion (Li-ion) batteries], two well-proven and synergistic technologies are providing highly cost-effective solutions for both consumer and industrial grade applications, including many connected to the IoT and the IIoT. All sorts of industrial applications are currently deploying PV/Li-ion battery hybrid technology, including GPS sensors and asset trackers, environmental monitoring systems, smart agriculture (monitoring moisture, temperature, and rainfall), marine buoys, and many other M2M and systems control and data automation (SCADA) applications.

Read the full article at Sensors Online.

Sembcorp Marine To Apply AM In Shipbuilding Revolution

A LAAM made part on display at the Sembcorp Marine MOU signing. Photo via A*STAR

Sembcorp Marine is seeking to revolutionize the offshore & marine (O&M) sector by adding cutting-edge technologies to its shipbuilding and repair efforts. In collaboration with three partners across industry and the Singapore government, the company will develop water-tight production applications with a Digital TwinAM and drone assistance.

Read the full article here.

SLM Solutions: Cooperation agreement signed with Authentise Inc.

SLM Solutions Group AG , a leading supplier of metal-based additive manufacturing technology, has recently signed a cooperation agreement with Authentise Inc. Software developed by Authentise helps SLM Solutions customers expand additive manufacturing capacities through greater efficiency, transparency and quality in deploying SLM machines.

Read the full press release here.

 

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Authentise Now Leader in Additive Manufacturing Data Connectivity

Data being used to reduce cost and scale additive manufacturing to production

 

Sandy, UT; 14 Nov 2017 – Authentise, a leader in process automation software for additive manufacturing, today announced that it has connected to and receives data from more additive manufacturing device types than any other software developers.

Authentise has worked with a number of additive manufacturing equipment providers, such as EOS or the recently announced partnership with SLM, to connect their devices to the Authentise 3Diax platform and Manufacturing Execution System (MES). Data can now be received from ARCAM, 3D Systems, EOS, SLM, Stratasys, and HP additive manufacturing devices, among others, with more to come.

The information provided by them is used to automate actions through Authentise MES. Examples of these actions include automatic order updates, in-depth traceability report creation or the training of machine learning models that can, for example, improve the accuracy of cost, time and maintenance
estimates. This reduces cost, improves reliability and increases output.

The machine data is also available independently through the Machine Analytics Module of the Authentise 3Diax platform. The Module allows users of additive manufacturing technology to create and use their own additive manufacturing automation workflows or to tie the data back into existing IT systems such as Enterprise Resource Planning (ERP) tools. Machine and software suppliers may also use the Machine Analytics Module to create and distribute their own Industry 4.0 solutions.

“In many ways additive manufacturing is not taking advantage of its digital opportunity” says Andre Wegner, CEO of Authentise. “We’re the first to use data to really scale up and take cost out of the process. In doing so we’re also providing a test bed for all of digital manufacturing as we’re going beyond predictive maintenance and analytics to enable immediate automation based on data. That drives nearly immediate return on investment of our customers.”

***

additional information overleaf
To find out more about the 3Diax modules, please visit www.authentise.com/modules.html

About Authentise: Authentise delivers software that enables the production-scale deployment of additive manufacturing. Its landmark products include the 3Diax modular platform as well as the Authentise Manufacturing Execution System. These tools use device data to solve discrete automation challenges and provide an avenue to fully automated order execution and tracking in additive manufacturing, reducing Total Cost of Ownership and speeding up product delivery. The company was founded in Silicon Valley in 2012 and has been covered by Bloomberg, the BBC, Wired, and others.

Find out more at www.authentise.com and follow on Twitter @authentise.

Media:
3DIAX Logo (Square, Horizontal)
Authentise Logo

Contact:
Andre Wegner
+16506918615
info@authentise.com

“ARCAM”, “3D Systems”, “EOS”, “SLM”, “Stratasys” and “HP” Brands and Trademarks are copyrights of their respective owners.

Counterfeiting within the new digital thread (Authentise Weekly News-In-Review – Week 47)

The augmented possibilities of 3D printing within the manufacturing industry hide new kinds of threats and dangers which should be confronted seriously. The nature of the new digital thread being formed within industrial businesses worldwide is such that new avenues of malicious interventions, theft or even sabotage become decentralized and digitized. CAD files can be corrupted remotely and invisibly; Intellectual Property (IP) can be stolen directly or be accessed by digitizing (3D scanning) physical assets; 3D printers’ firmware and control sensors can be compromised to alter the printing results invisibly to the human eye. Counterfeiting is high on the list of perils. The international community is moving to secure AM processes by installing safe practices within the thread. Authentise has very recently announced a partnership with Prototech to enable automatic watermarking of printed objects. New roads of securing 3D printed object are being explored, like leaving chemical signatures that are only readable through X-rays.

3D printing presents cyber security risks for aircraft manufacturers, says Atlantic Council report

The Atlantic Council, a Washington, D.C. think-tank has released a new report which outlines the benefits and risks of 3D printing within the aviation sector. The report is entitled “Aviation Security: Finding Lift, Minimizing Drag.” […] According to the report, additive manufacturing opens up the possibility for three main kinds of cyberattacks: deny, which consists of the disruption of deletion of firmware, software, and product designs; compromise, which is the theft of intellectual property and product design files; and sabotage, which refers to “undetected modification” of printing files with the intention of weakening parts and corrupting their functions.

Write the full report here.

ProtoTech Solutions and Authentise Enable Automatic Watermarks For 3D Printing

Authentise, a leader in process automation software for additive manufacturing, today announced that it has partnered with ProtoTech Solutions, a niche software development company in the CAD/CAM/CAE, 3D visualization and data interoperability domain, to help 3Diax customers automatically embed watermarks such as serial numbers into digital designs. This enables more efficient and reliable tracking and sorting of parts within factories. It also has the potential to significantly speed up the supply chain and reduce the number of counterfeit parts in circulation.

Check out the full press release here.

Chemical Ghost Signature Protect DED 3D Printed Parts From Counterfeiting

DED 3D printed titanium samples with varying taggant depths used in the InfraTrac study. Photo via 3D Printing and Additive Manufacturing journal.

The solution proposed by Dr. Sharon Flank et al. from InfraTrac, is to add spectral signatures to the 3D printed parts that can only be read via x-ray. This technique is more cost effective than some of the other methods of experimentation as it can be conducted using off-the-shelf devices. […] In InfraTrac’s study, an Optomec M7 LENS system is used to 3D print titanium alloy samples. Chemical taggants are added to the parts at different depths, and scanned using x-ray fluorescence (XRF) spectroscopy analysis in lab conditions.

Read the full article here.

 

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SLM Solutions: Cooperation agreement signed with Authentise Inc.

  • Cooperation aims to integrate real-time production data from SLM Solutions machines into Authentise’s 3Diax software platform
  • Integration enables SLM Solutions customers to evaluate real-time production data to automate process flows
  • Capability to analyze real-time production data especially important in series manufacturing

 

Lübeck, 09 November 2017 – SLM Solutions Group AG (“SLM Solutions”), a leading supplier of metal-based additive manufacturing technology, has recently signed a cooperation agreement with Authentise Inc. (“Authentise”). Authentise is a leading US-based provider of software to automate additive manufacturing processes. Software developed by Authentise helps SLM Solutions customers expand additive manufacturing capacities through greater efficiency, transparency and quality in deploying SLM machines.

Henner Schöne4582_schoeneborn.0041born, member of the Management Board of SLM Solutions Group AG: “We’re very pleased with this partnership with Authentise, as it represents an expansion of our existing Industry 4.0 initiatives and solutions. This collaboration enables our customers to access real-time production data from SLM machines – a capability that’s enormously important especially for customers that deploy our machines for series manufacturing of components. With this partnership, we’re taking an important step towards the fully automated processing of orders on our machines. Authentise supplements our Additive Hub design software that we developed in-house.”

 

07c513d9-834b-4970-a537-59593dc316d7Andre Wegner, Authentise CEO, adds: “This partnership with SLM is an important step to completing the digital thread in additive manufacturing. The direct data access to SLM machines that has now been enabled can be combined with other functionalities of our 3Diax software modules to automate manual tasks. It is possible, for example, to automatically update an order status, or generate documentation that enables finished components to be traced back to source. Our 3Diax platform utilizes data in the sense of a self-learning system. The partnership also makes it easier to integrate SLM machines into SLM Solutions’ customers’ IT systems, and facilitates the transparent analysis of production data through the 3Diax Machine Analytics module. The partnership with SLM Solutions  – a leading supplier of metal-based additive manufacturing technology – is so important because  together can we expand the use of additive manufacturing machines in series production.”

About the companies:

SLM Solutions Group AG

Lübeck-based SLM Solutions Group AG is a leading provider of metal-based additive manufacturing technology. The company’s shares are traded in the Prime Standard of the Frankfurt Stock Exchange. The stock has been listed in the TecDAX index since March 21, 2016. SLM Solutions focuses on the development, assembly and sale of machines and integrated system solutions in the field of selective laser melting. SLM Solutions currently employs over 360 members of staff in Germany, the USA, Singapore, Russia, India and China. The products are utilised worldwide by customers in particular from the aerospace, energy, healthcare and automotive industries.  

Authentise Inc.

Authentise Inc. offers software solutions facilitating the deployment of additive manufacturing in production environments. The solutions it offers include the 3Diax Modular Platform as well as the Authentise Manufacturing Execution System (MES). The MES utilizes data from additive manufacturing machines to resolve automation challenges, creating a path to fully automated order processing and tracking. 3Diax modules also provide the flexibility to easily adapt such automation to existing work processes and integrate it into already existent IT systems. The software products enable total production costs to be reduced and customers’ product launch times to be accelerated. Authentise Inc. was founded in 2012 in Silicon Valley and is also represented in Europe.

 

Contact:

Georg Grießmann, cometis AG

Unter den Eichen 7, 65195 Wiesbaden

Telephone: +49 (0) 611-205855-61

E-Mail: griessmann@cometis.de

ProtoTech Solutions and Authentise Enable Automatic Watermarks For 3D Printing

New 3Diax Module to help drive additive manufacturing to production scale.

Serialisation

Sandy, UT and Pune, India; Oct 31 2017 – Authentise, a leader in process automation software for additive manufacturing, today announced that it has partnered with ProtoTech Solutions, a niche software development company in the CAD/CAM/CAE, 3D visualization and data interoperability domain, to help 3Diax customers automatically embed watermarks such as serial numbers into digital designs.

As part of the agreement, ProtoTech will exclusively offer its watermarking technology through the 3Diax platform and Authentise will market the technology as the 3Diax Watermarking Module. The Module enables serial numbers, barcodes or other identifiers to be embedded at any point in the geometry – on the part, in the support structures, on an attached tag, and even below the surface so that it can only be detected by X-Ray or similar technologies. This enables more efficient and reliable tracking and sorting of parts within factories. It also has the potential to significantly speed up supply chain and reduce the number of counterfeit parts in circulation.

The combination with other 3Diax modules, such as the geometric search module, makes the tool even more powerful. As a result, geometries could be marked even if they are not identical by identifying the similarity of incoming objects to existing templates.

337f81e“We understand geometries and what it takes to change them on the fly” says Varun Bhartiya, Partner at ProtoTech Solutions. “The 3Diax infrastructure is the best way for subject matter experts like us to contribute to badly needed workflow automation in the additive manufacturing sector. Using AM’s unique ability to make differentiated designs at no additional cost our modules can be used to eliminate costly secondary processes such as laser-engraving. This is the first step in our partnership with Authentise to make additive manufacturing more efficient and turn it into a production alternative.”

07c513d9-834b-4970-a537-59593dc316d7“As all Modules on the 3Diax platform, Watermarking works ‘behind-the- hood’”, says Andre Wegner, CEO of Authentise. “This means the actions happen automatically, without the need for manual operator interactions, which saves our clients time and enables them to scale. The modular structure of the platform and the API access also enables us to integrate this module with others, or directly into corporate IT systems. We’re delighted to work with CAD software professionals such as ProtoTech to extend the platform”

***

To find out more about the 3Diax modules, please visit www.authentise.com/modules.html

About ProtoTech Solutions: ProtoTech Solutions is a niche software development services provider in the domain of CAD/CAM/CAE, 3D visualization and data interoperability. The company was found in 2005 and have been helping global organizations achieve their time-to- market and business goals by developing 3D custom applications, CAD Plugins, 3D Mobile apps, 3D web apps, 3D PDF exporters, file exporters/importers, and host of mission-critical engineering application projects.

Find out more at www.prototechsolutions.com and follow on Twitter @ProtoTechSoln.
About Authentise: Authentise delivers software that enables the production-scale deployment of additive manufacturing. Its landmark products include the 3Diax modular platform as well as the Authentise Manufacturing Execution System. These tools use device data to solve discrete automation challenges and provide an avenue to fully automated order execution and tracking in additive manufacturing, reducing Total Cost of Ownership and speeding up product delivery. The company was founded in Silicon Valley in 2012 and has been covered by Bloomberg, the BBC, Wired, and others.

Find out more at www.authentise.com and follow on Twitter @authentise.

Media:

3DIAX Logo (Square, Horizontal)
Authentise Logo
Images of Serialisation: 1, 2, 3 (Caption: Serial numbers can be automatically implanted at a specific or general area of the part with the 3Diax Watermarking Module. Combined with the 3Diax Geometric Search Module, the new tool can extend beyond identical parts and implant a range of similar components.)
Image of Steganography (Caption: The 3Diax Watermarking Module can also enable non-human readable codes to be implanted into geometries. All watermarks can be implanted on tags, in support structures or on the surface or internal to the original object.)

Contact:

Andre Wegner
+16506918615
info@authentise.com

The opportunities of 3D printing organic compounds (Authentise Weekly News-In-Review – Week 46)

3D printing is still struggling to overcome issues regarding biodegradability and its ecological impact. We’ve been using materials for thousands of years that are of natural origin and can easily be disposed of. It’s been a challenge to translate that to the latest manufacturing tech around. Cellulose is having a comeback, as researchers are understanding how to create polymer structures from abundant and renewable raw materials. A new group of new biomaterials is being developed, some with transient properties, capable of degrading and dissolving on-demand. Nanocellulose has been invented in the 1970s as a food thickener and could be coming to a dish near you, made more palatable thanks to 3D printing. Advances in chemistry collide with the challenges of 3D printing to open the way for complex, smart and immensely useful organic materials.

MIT Develops Method To 3D Print Abundant Natural Polymer Cellulose

Diagram showing a) printing process b) process under a microscope c) extruded filament d) mini glasses e) mini rose. Image via Advanced Science News.

MIT scientists Dr. Sebastian Pattinson and Prof A.J. Hart have now published a possible method of 3D printing a derivative of cellulose as a substitute for environmentally problematic plastics, one which sidesteps previously encountered problems. […] As detailed in the research paper, after printing, the cellulose acetate parts can be converted to cellulose proper by de-acetylation using sodium hydroxide.

Read the full article here.

3D Printed Biomaterials Degrade on Demand

Biomaterials that can degrade on demand have been 3D printed by engineers at Brown University. The materials were fabricated by means of stereolithographic printing, which uses an ultraviolet laser controlled by a computer-aided design system to trace patterns across the surface of a photoactive polymer solution. The capacity of the materials to degrade is imparted by the development of reversible ionic bonds. Precursor solutions were prepared with sodium alginate, a compound derived from seaweed that is known to be capable of ionic crosslinking. Different combinations of ionic salts, including magnesium, barium and calcium, were then added to 3D print objects with varying stiffness levels, a factor which affected how quickly the structures dissolved.

Read more about the research here.

Can 3D Printed Nanocellulose Transform The Food Industry?

Cellulose is a natural ingredient, but would you necessarily want to eat it? Diagram of the nanocellulose extraction process via bio1151.nicerweb

The Yissum Research Development Company of the Hebrew University of Jerusalem is the latest institution to introduce a nanocellulose-based platform that promises “the 3D printing of personalized food” with the added ability “to cook, bake, fry and grill while printing at the three dimensional space.”

Read the full article here.

 

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Building an Industry: AM Strategic Initiatives (Authentise Weekly News-In-Review – Week 45)

Additive manufacturing is becoming established in the industrial world and businesses are realizing its potential through integration and experimentation. Nonetheless, the road ahead is still to be delineated: the technology will advance, that’s almost a given. It’s the underlying framework of education and collaborations that will make for fertile ground in its development. It is apparent that the manufacturing world needs a solid foundation of standards and practices, something that has already been addressed by the AMTS (Additive Manufacturing Technology Standards), NIST (National Institute of Standards and Technology) and now the FAA is filing a strategic roadmap. Educational institutions around the world are starting to offer courses on AM technologies, even at MIT, to push the next generation of innovators into the fray. Just as important is the effort by businesses to offer opportunities to students and partnerships with research institutions, bridging the gap between skill and resources.

FAA To Launch Eight-Year Additive Manufacturing Road Map

GE Aviation's T901 Turboshaft engine for use inside the U.S. Army's Apache and Black Hawk helicopters. Image via GE Aviation

Filed for review in late September, the U.S. Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) has developed a draft Additive Manufacturing Strategic Roadmap, advising businesses of adequate practice surrounding the different technologies in the industry. The roadmap features key regulation information covering emerging considerations around part and process certification, machine and part maintenance, research and development and the demand for doubled-down efforts in additive education and training.

Read the full article here.

Additive Manufacturing, From Prototyping to Production

This 90-minute online learning session is a fast, effective way to learn from MIT faculty experts in additive and smart manufacturing about the cutting-edge of industrial 3D printing – from new materials and processes to the latest applications and technology trends. Join Professor John Hart as you discover how additive manufacturing is being used to transform business models and revolutionize manufacturing at scale.

Register for this free web course here.

New Center Introducing ESA Projects and Space Firms to 3D Printing

ESA is establishing a new ‘one-stop shop’ covering 3D printing for space in partnership with the Manufacturing Technology Centre. The MTC research organization, based in Coventry and home to the UK National Centre for Additive Manufacturing, will manage the new ESA Additive Manufacturing Benchmarking Centre (AMBC), which will provide a simple and easy way for ESA projects and hi-tech companies to investigate the potential of 3D printing for their work.

Check out the full article here.

 

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Decentrailized manufacturing: how AM disrupts logistics (Authentise Weekly News-In-Review – Week 44)

Much of the activities surrounding an industrial operation require a lot of logistical effort to work efficiently. Just think about the amount of planning required beforehand to build a house and during construction to make every step slide into place. These activities take up a big chunk of the overall cost of operations but AM is poised to change things up. What this technology allows is to decentralize the manufacturing power, enabling its redistribution where and when it is needed. Going back to the building example, a 3D printer can be set up to take care of pretty much all the chores of constructing the essential structure: eliminating the need to organize bricks shipping and handling and much more, effectively working with raw materials that could even be sourced locally. Automotive businesses are already eyeing AM as a solution to its replacement parts stock problem. A 3D printer can manufacture any component a customer may need (even if it’s obsolete), taking away the need to maintain massive inventories, dislocating these factories so that shipping may not even be an issue. Closer to the production plant, the capabilities of AM render many of the steps included in the traditional pipeline redundant, essentially shrinking it and reducing costs and time.

 

World’s first 3D-printed bridge opens to cyclists in Netherlands

Dutch officials have toasted the opening of what is being called the world’s first 3D-printed concrete bridge, which is primarily meant to be used by cyclists. “The bridge is not very big, but it was rolled out by a printer, which makes it unique,” Theo Salet, from the Eindhoven University of Technology, told Dutch broadcaster NOS. Work on printing the bridge, which has some 800 layers, took about three months after starting in June and it is made of reinforced, pre-stressed concrete, according to the university.

Read the full article here.

 

Electrolux Trials 3D Printed Spare Parts On Demand With Spare Parts 3D

A spare parts warehouse, which Electolux looks to replace using 3D printing. Photo via Spare Parts 3D.

Electrolux, a Swedish domestic appliance manufacturer, is performing a series of tests and analyses ahead of producing on-demand 3D printed spare parts to its customers. […] Electrolux is attempting to address problems affecting both the manufacturer and consumer. For the manufacturer the problem is high production, inventory and maintenance costs for spare parts after the production of the actual appliances has stopped, yet they are still in use. For the consumer, costs of replacement increase after the product is no longer sold, and it often takes a substantial amount of time to process and ship replacement parts.

Read the full article here.

 

Ricoh To Replace Metal Tooling With Stratasys 3D Printed Equivalents

A 3D printed fixture in use on the workbench. Screenshot via Stratasys on YouTube

Electronics and imaging company Ricoh Japan has announced that it is replacing its traditional metal tooling with 3D printed jigs and fixtures made on a Stratasys Fortus 900mc system. By integrating 3D printed tools at the Production Technology Center in Miyagi prefecture, Japan, Ricoh is boosting operational yield, and creating a more cost-effective, streamlined assembly line.

Keep reading here.

 

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We’ll be at Formnext 2017 between the 14th-17th of November! Come check us out at booth Booth # 3.1-A33.