Big Data to tackle Big Problems (Authentise Weekly News-In-Review – Week 06)

Hi and welcome to another edition of the News-In-Review, brought to you by Authentise!

The computational power at our disposal is increasing exponentially, being that of the phone in our pockets or the super-computer of the country next door. In our interconnected world, data is engulfing everything (as highlighted in our Week 3 edition). This week we propose how the two are coming together to address the great problems in our world, from national resource management to safer and more accurate than ever 3D printing. As IIoT is embedded in the national grid, it’s changing from a rigid, failure prone network to an efficient, system optimized in real time approach thanks to data-driven analytics. Processing that data requires new IT innovations, such as the first exascale super-computer now built in Chian. This, previously unattainable computational power allows us to simulate better 3D printing designs, materials and processes and can be used to unlock more AM use cases, such as construction.

As ever, there’s a lot to cover here. Let’s jump in!

Big Water – Big Data Is Reshaping The Water Industry

Data management, exploratory analytics, data visualization and predictive algorithms enable the discovery of important behavioral characteristics of highly‐complex urban infrastructure. Water management relies on heavy physical infrastructure and reactive administration. This changes with the development of cyber-physical systems, real-time monitoring, big data analysis and predictive machine learning algorithms and the IoT. These systems enable a transition from reacting to optimized, proactive and cost-efficient management processes.

Check out the full article here.

World’s First Exascale Supercomputer to Enhance 3D Printing Capabilities

The Tianhe-2 Super Computer

China’s National Supercomputer Centre announced that the prototype for its exascale supercomputer will be completed later this year, ahead of its initial date in 2018. The successful performance and commercialization of the computer is presumed to drastically improve existing 3D printing or additive manufacturing methods. […] Through the usage of an exascale computing-based application, manufacturers will be able to use additive manufacturing technologies to better simulate end products and significantly optimize processes before the last stage of manufacturing.

Read the full article here.

Building by numbers: how 3D printing is shaking up the construction industry

Stewart Williams [admits] that quality control represents a major challenge [to the building industry]. To be viable, any printed building technique will have systems that can constantly monitor and inspect the materials as they are being produced. As he notes wryly: “You wouldn’t want to build a massive beam and get to the end and find you’ve got some holes in it.” Assuming regulators can be convinced, the potential upsides of 3D printing for the construction industry could be huge. Among the factors in the technology’s favor are productivity gains, reduced labor costs and safer working environments, as well as the sort of one-off, complex building designs that are not technically and economically feasible at present.

Read the whole article at the Guardian.

 

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