Maybe now Manufacturers will take Cyber-security seriously? (Authentise Weekly News-In-Review – Week 84)

A bunch of manufacturing related cybersecurity stories hit the news in the last week. We hold little hope that it will change things.

First, over 150 GB of raw manufacturing data was released into the wild, then a customised virus hit the manufacturing operations of iPhone semiconductor supplier TCMS in a hit that was reminiscent of the Stuxnet attack on Iran’s centrifuges, and nobody noticed when an Israeli company suggested a way to get around the intercept problem uncovered by Chris Williams @Virginia a few years ago.

Truth is, despite representing 16% of GDP in the US, manufacturing is still seriously flummoxed by cybersecrutiy.  The gut reaction of many in the industry is simply to say: let’s not connect our devices then. That is increasingly impossible and dangerous to growth. Continued resilience to solutions will hamper our ability to bring manufacturing into the 21st century. We’ve presented solutions (both technological and theoretical) but await a more dynamic response from the industry. Maybe we’ll see more at IMTS this year? Join us there!

More Than 150 Gigabytes of Manufacturing Data Found Exposed on Web

A misconfigured data transfer server left sensitive data from big name car makers and their employees wide open to the Internet earlier this month, a security vendor has revealed. Itnews.com reports that documents belonging to more than 100 manufacturing companies were exposed on a publicly accessible server belonging to Level One Robotics, …

Read the full article on Assembly Magazine.

iPhone Chipmaker Races to Recover After Crippling Computer Virus

Taiwan Semiconductor Manufacturing Co., which makes chips for the iPhone and other devices, is recovering from a debilitating computer virus but warned of delayed shipments and reduced revenue because of the impact on its factories.

TSMC said that 80 percent of the fabrication tools affected by a virus outbreak Friday evening had been restored and that it expects full recovery on Monday. …

Read the full article on Bloomberg.

Researchers Develop Audio-Based Method to Detect 3D Printing Cyber-Attacks

Ben-Gurion University of the Negev in Israel researchers has published a study titled “Digital Audio Signature for 3D Printing Integrity”, examining the use of “audio fingerprints” to help detect cyber-attacks on 3D printers.
Screen-Shot-2018-07-24-at-23.39.58
Read the full article on All3DP.