The short, and long term planning for AM’s future (Authentise Weekly News-In-Review – #111)

3D printing is a technological trend and as with all trends, one should at least try to plan on its future development. So while we’re excited about every new applications, such as the rapid advances the industry is making to make the old traditional tooling industry much more efficient, we’re also excited about the medium term. That includes projects such as houses being 3D printed with biodegradable materials in record times – maybe not immediately relevant but clearly disruptive. Long term though, opportunities are even more disruptive. Our recently approved patent may be a while away from making us money, but importance and disruptive nature of distributed manufacturing is so significant that it’s worth investing every USD to make sure that people collaborate to make it happen. It is a stepping stone for a future infrastructure for production scale AM, one that’s made of building blocks yet to come. We are proud to give our work for the betterment of the industry as a whole, and excited to bring this vision to fruition along with other teams equally as hungry for innovation.

3D printed tool cuts through titanium, wins innovation prize

PhD candidate Jimmy Toton from RMIT University in Melbourne, Australia, has won the 2019 Young Defence Innovator Award and $15,000 prize at the Avalon International Airshow for the research, which was conducted with Defence Materials Technology Centre (DMTC) and industry partner Sutton Tools.

“Now that we’ve shown what’s possible, the full potential of 3D printing can start being applied to this industry, where it could improve productivity and tool life while reducing cost,” Toton said.

Read the full article here.

 

3D-printed Gaia house is made from biodegradable materials

Gaia is a 3D-printed house by WASP made from biodegradable materials

Italian 3D-printing technology developer WASP, built the house to showcase the abilities of Crane Wasp, a modular 3D-printer that can create homes in a variety of formats and sizes. Called Gaia, the 30-square-metre house has a 3D-printed outer shell and internal timber beams holding a timber roof. It was printed on site in Massa Lombardo, a town in the Italian region of Emilia-Romagna, in October 2018.

Read the full article at Dezeen.

 

The Real Value Of 3D Printing Patents

[Image: Pexels]

Because patents are a business reality, filing one is a business decision. So when Authentise this week announced the approval of a new patent — for its “System, Method and Program Product for Digital Production Management” — the initial assumption was easy: they’ve decided to protect their IP. That’s not the whole case, though. Andre Wegner, Authentise’s Founder and CEO, confesses that as a rule he doesn’t “care much for patents.” So why file one?

It is ultimately a strategic move, yes, but not one that Authentise really plans for itself. Rather, it’s a move to prove a much larger business case for digital manufacturing.

“In other words,” Wegner explains in a thoughtful LinkedIn piece, “we see this patent as a shining ad to the industry as to where the technology is moving. To get there, we have to work together with others. To work with others, we have to show them there’s value in it. That we think there’s enough value to file a patent.”

Read the full article at Fabbaloo.

 

We are going to exhibit at AMUG! Come visit us at booth #37 from March 31st – April 4th.

Follow us on Twitter to keep updated on AM & IIoT related news as well as updates to Authentise’s services!