Security & Systematic issues in wake of IIoT (Authentise Weekly News-In-Review – Week 12)

Hello to our dear readers, welcome to the latest edition of News-In-Review!

IIoT is a term dense of meanings and implications. A lot of businesses see in its wake the possibility of unprecedented ROIs and some are already putting down the foundations to implement it in their proceedings. However, before obtaining the many benefits of data analytics, the proper system has to be put in place. One that needs to improve upon a pre-existing industrial network, fixing it’s outdated vulnerabilities, without the need for a complete overhaul. One that is able to withstand a growing risk of DDOS attacks from a growing number of sources thanks to the sensors riddled world we are constructing. And lastly, but not least, one that can assure quality processes and control of every step of the process chain.

If this is a topic you’re interested in, and want to dig in further, our CEO and CTO have written a chapter for Springer’s new “Cyberphysical Security for Industry 4.0” – due May 10.

Here’s this week news:

Forgotten factors that could take down IIoT

When it comes to IoT adoption in the industrial space, I’ve often found that operators worry about how they’re going to run before they can even walk. What this means is industrial operators let certain barriers to entry — primarily security and availability — keep them from even starting on their path to IIoT. In reality, there are certain key steps that industrial companies need to take well before they even attempt that transition.

Read more about these steps here.

Security Professionals Expect More Attacks On IIoT in 2017

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As technology vendors race to create more and more devices connected to the Internet of Things (IoT) the opportunity for hackers to get into these devices grows larger and larger, as these IoT devices are usually made with little to no regard for security. The fears of a large-scale attack waiting to happen were solidified this week when security firm Tripwire released the results of a study it performed about the rise of industrial IoT deployment in organizations, and to what extent it is expected to cause security problems in 2017.

Read the article and study at Onthewire.

Control is the key factor for implementing additive manufacturing in industry

According to the UK’s Manufacturing Technology Centre (MTC), control is the key factor for the implementation of additive manufacturing in an industrial setting. Speaking at today’s Additive World conference […] the MTC’s David Wimpenny explains the most important obstacles additive manufacturing needs to address. They created the National Centre for Additive Manufacturing two years ago, as a visualization of how they expect an additive manufacturing ‘factory of the future’ would look. However, Wimpenny is keen to stress it is not about the number of parts produced in the factory, but about control of the processes. Control of the quality and control of the data is the most important consideration for Wimpenny. As he says, “In a process chain, whatever you don’t control will be a problem”.

Read more here.

 

Don’t forget to follow us on Twitter and to come back in a week time to get a new glimpse at the future of AM, IIoT and all things in between!

Certifying AM for Industrial Excellence (Authentise Weekly News-In-Review – Week 11)

Hello to all our viewers, welcome to this week’s edition of News-In-Review!

Every week we are swarmed with varied news from the AM world which makes it hard to pinpoint a common theme or thread to talk about. Nevertheless, the world of 3D printing made giant leaps this week with regards to getting its righteous spot in the pantheon of certified industrial technologies. Lloyd’s Register has released an updated framework for metal AM parts certification to encourage the safe adoption of this technology in every industry. Siemens have provided an AM replacement part for a Slovenian nuclear power plant, passing the required quality certifications. And if further use cases were needed to prove the point, SSL has been using around 50-60 AM components in its satellites and we all know how stringent aerospace requirements can be.

Let’s dive in.

Lloyd’s Register, TWI release updated framework for 3D printed metal certification

Prof. Attallah steps on a 3D printed metal lattice Photo by www.edwardmoss.co.uk All rights reserved University of Birmingham Alumni

Headquartered in London, Lloyd’s Register (LR) has released an updated version of its metal additive manufacturing framework. Jointly published by research and technology organization TWI, the framework hopes to encourage “safe adoption” of metal 3D printing by promoting certification of parts. According to Lloyd’s Register, the new certification framework for AM metallic components “Provides a step-by-step approach to provide the necessary level of consistency, qualification and confidence to enable manufacturers an approach they can use alongside LR’s inspection and certification services”.

Read the full article here.

Siemens 3D prints part for nuclear power plant

The largest manufacturing and electronics company in Europe, Siemens announces it has 3D printed a replacement part for a nuclear power plant in Slovenia. The part was produced for the Krško nuclear power plant in Vrbina, Slovenia. According to Siemens, the power plant provides power for one-quarter of Slovenia and 15% of neighboring Croatia. This is a significant accomplishment not just for Siemens but for the 3D printing industry as a whole because implementing this part required undergoing stringent certification and qualification processes spanning several months. The news further validates 3D printing as an advanced manufacturing technique.

Read more here.

3D printing saving satellite builders time and money

Satellite manufacturers are turning increasingly to additive manufacturing to reduce the cost and time required to design and build spacecraft. SSL announced March 7 that its most complex additively manufactured part, an antenna tower with 37 printed titanium nodes and more than 80 graphite struts, is performing as intended. […] “We have satellites ready for launch that have 50 to 60 printed parts on them,” Mark Spiwak, Boeing Satellite Systems International president, said March 7 during a press briefing at the Satellite 2017 conference. “We are actively working with our suppliers on complex brackets and fittings that used to be machined parts. There is tremendous progress being made.”

Read the full article at Space News.

 

Don’t forget to check back next week and to follow us on Twitter to get all the news we don’t feature here!

Governments Driving AM (Authentise Weekly News-In-Review – Week 10)

Hi everyone, here we go for another weekly News-In-Review!

This week we highlight, through our selected news, how AM is bringing the wind of change to countries’ industrial planning and policies and how its inclusion has driven economic growth. Through wise policy making and good support investments, countries like South Africa and England and enabling the creation of business ecosystems, both startups and well-established realities. Germany is already harvesting the fruits of long standing AM companies, with innovation driven partnerships in the automotive industry and beyond.

Here’s to more international effort to get into AM!

Let’s dig in.

UK publishes Digital Strategy outlining plans for Makerspaces, IP protection for 3D printing, and internationally connected Tech Hubs

Westminster, including London's Houses of Parliament. Photo by Ged Carroll, on Flickr as renaissancechambara

The UK Department for Culture, Media & Sport has released a Digital Strategy for economic, educational and infrastructural growth of the nation. The policy follows a seven prong plan touching on the concepts of Makerspaces, FabLabs, 3D imaging, intellectual property for 3D printing, and growing international Tech Hubs. In February 2017, London Mayor Sadiq Khan also announced plans for a hub of industry in East London. As part of a total regeneration of the area, Silvertown is expected to feature the largest 3D printing facility in the UK.

Read more here.

South Africa in talks with Airbus, Boeing to print 3D parts

An Airbus A400M military aircraft. REUTERS/Fabrizio Bensch

Officially launched in 2011 and backed by government, the Aeroswift research project last year produced its first three demonstrator parts – a pilot’s throttle lever, a condition lever grip which is part of the throttle assembly, and a fuel tank pylon bracket, in a digital process known as 3D printing, or additive layer manufacturing. […] South Africa’s Council for Scientific and Industrial Research (CSIR), in partnership with local aerospace firm Aerosud Innovation Centre, say access to vast titanium reserves as well as pioneering the world’s largest titanium powder-based 3D printing machine should give them a competitive edge.

Read the full article here.

Five Stories Indicating Auto 3D Printing Is Kicking into High Gear

A 3D-printed water pump wheel for use in a DTM racecar. (Image courtesy of the BMW Group.)

Although there are numerous stories regarding the use of additive manufacturing (AM) in aerospace, due to the specialty components needed for critical applications, AM is also becoming increasingly prevalent for end part production in auto manufacturing. Below are just five of the big automotive AM stories that demonstrate its potential for auto manufacturing.

Read about the five stories at Engineering.com

 

AERODEF 2017:  We have a session titled ‘Additive Manufacturing from Lab to Production Scale‘ on Thursday 3/9 at 10 am, room 102 at Aerodef. Come see us, we’d love to meet you!

This is it for this week, don’t forget to follow us on Twitter and come back next week for the upcoming edition.

AM’s Symbiotic Relationship with Light Studies (Authentise Weekly News-In-Review – Week 09)

Hi everyone, and welcome to this week’s edition of Authentise News-In-Review!

This week we take a moment to marvel at the wonderfully symbiotic relationship between AM technologies and the study of light, or photonics. AM research is enabling scientists to work with entirely new materials with properties that are offering new ways to interact with nature and study our world. In exchange, our refined knowledge of photonics, empowered by this lengthened list of tools at our disposal, is fueling innovation within AM  technologies, pushing them to work faster, more reliably and accurately than before.

Here’s to light. Let’s dive in.

This Super-Fast 3-D Printer Is Powered by Holograms

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[…] The basic principle here is an established 3D printing technique that uses lasers to cure a light-activated monomer into solid plastic. But unlike other approaches, which scan a laser back and forth to create shapes one layer at a time, this system does it all at once using a 3D light field—in other words, a hologram. It could make 3D printing far faster. The advantage of Daqri’s [a startup that designs and builds augmented-reality devices out of laboratories in San Francisco and in Milton Keynes, U.K.] chip, the company says, is that it can create holograms without the need for complex optics. On a silicon wafer, a tiny grid of tunable crystals is used to control the magnitude and time delay, or phase, of reflected light shined at the surface of the chip from a laser. Software adjusts the crystals to create patterns of interference in the light, resulting in a three-dimensional light field.

Read the full article at Technology Review.

3D printed ceramic “butterfly wings” add color to photonic research

The iridescent wings of butterfly. Photo by Kathleen Dagostino, kathleencavalaro on Flickr

In a paper published in Nature Communications, physicists demonstrate the ability to reproduce the reflective structure of a butterfly wing through 3D printed gyroids. The discovery was made through the study of photonics – how light moves through space and objects – and has resulted in the patenting of a new material. […] Through a 3D printed gyroid, the researchers at Surrey and San Francisco demonstrate an ability to manipulate the photonic band gap through the shape of their ceramic object.

Read the full article here.

3D printing meets lasers in latest stem cell research

Stem cells can be used to build a brain tumour, which could help us beat it.

New research from Vilnius University in Lithuania combines laser writing and 3D printing to create more efficient micro-structures for the culture of stem cells. With computer aided design, biologists can specify structures that will allow cells to grow in a particular way, i.e. to form the pore-structure of the skin, or the cylindrical tissue of a vein. As to be expected, getting the right shape and form is a delicate process. The research from Vilnius University adds laser precision to such 3D microfabrication.

Read the full article here.

 

As a bonus article, here is our CEO Andre Wegner talking about the cloud, IIoT and the need for IT and OT to communicate.

Authentise CEO Bears Witness to OT, IT Folks Playing Nice in Cloud

 

Analytics is just the beginning of the IoT journey for manufacturers. There are already positive examples of machine control via the cloud. Authentise CEO Andre Wegner delivered that glimmer of hope tonight to more than a handful of people gathered around one of several topic tables at the Hard Rock Hotel in San Diego’s Gaslamp Quarter, the venue chosen to kick off Industry of Things World USA 2017. […] Authentise provides systems “to customers who are comfortable with a managed cloud, as well as those who are deciding to host it on premise,” he said. “We do what the customer wants, and are seeing about an even split in public cloud adoption. That’s probably more than most since industrial 3D printing is a new market and devices are most often already connected.”

Read the full article here.

 

This is it for this week’s edition, don’t forget to follow us on Twitter and to come back next week for another fill on the week’s juiciest AM news.

Bolstering, and Innovating, Local Manufacturing (Authentise Weekly News-In-Review – Week 08)

Hello everyone and welcome to another edition of the weekly News-In-Review, brought to you by Authentise!

There are quite a few factors that contribute to AM’s status as king of the hill of advanced manufacturing processes. By the very nature of AM, manufacturing is becoming decentralized, democratized and is opening doors to new industrial workflows, much more efficient and smart than before. This allows countries to diminish retain manufacturing (and the added value) locally, industrializing their economy (as IMTS’ development of India’s first jet engine). Integrating and developing new manufacturing paradigms like AM will create competitive advantages (as Russia is doing in 3D printed construction), jobs and invigorate the local industrial scene, and enable a greener and more material-efficient economic model (as the UK’s Green Alliance points out).

Here are just a few examples. Let’s take a look.

Intech DMLS developing “India’s first jet engine”

Intech DMLS, a metal additive manufacturing company from India, have announced the development of the country’s first jet engine series. […] the MJE20 engine starts small, powering unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) and remote-controlled aircraft. According to the Times of India, this will make them the first Asian country to develop an indigenous jet engine.

Read more here.

3D printing construction company Apis Cor prints 37 m2 house near Moscow, plans global expansion

Apis Cor, an additive manufacturing construction company based in San Francisco and the Russian cities of Moscow and Irkutsk, has used its own construction 3D printer to build a 3D printed house in Stupino, near Moscow. Construction of the 37m2 building took less than a day. “We are people,” Apis Cor says. “Engineers, managers, builders, and inventors sharing one common idea—to change the construction industry so that millions of people will have an opportunity to improve their living conditions.”

Read more about this ambitious project here.

3D Printing and the Green Economy

Capture

3D printing may play a role in creating a more resource-efficient economy in the UK according to a new study conducted by Green Alliance, a British think tank.
The study, “Getting it Right from the Start: Developing a Circular Economy for Novel Materials,” posits that using new materials and designing for recycling could lower manufacturing costs in Great Britain. The study was conducted for Innovate UK, the High-Value Manufacturing Catapult and the Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council. The use of carbon fiber, bioplastics and 3D printing technologies can create parts and products that are even more durable than those that use plastics created from fossil fuels. These technologies could also enable new, more eco-friendly business models and product lifecycles.

 

As always, don’t forget to subscribe to our newsletter for weekly reviews like this one and updates on Authentise’s services (on Twitter too!).

Redifining Medical Customizability (Authentise Weekly News-In-Review – Week 07)

Hi all and welcome to week 6 of Authentise News-In-Review!

This week we are going to talk about customization for medical applications. AM’s freedom of design makes this one of technology’s core benefits, but nowhere is this more true than in the medical arena. We’ve long heard about custom prosthetics but it can go much further than that. Personalized medicine is taking giant steps to practicality thanks to AM and new “bioinks” are enabling new treatments that could mould to specific patients’ scenarios, like dodging intolerances or adding particular vitamin supplements. Laboratories can study diseases in custom made samples thanks to 3D printing’s power to change design, physical properties and materials on the designer’s whim.

Let’s dive in.

A new 3D bioink for PolyJet 3D printed pills

Researchers at the University of California in Los Angeles (UCLA) have developed a viable bioink for 3D printed pills.  In this study, Giovanny Acosta-Vélez, Chase Linsley, Madison Craig and Benjamin Wu favour the inkjet technique over other 3D printing technologies for its speed and ability to print at room temperature. The temperate environment ensures that active pharmaceutical ingredients (APIs) aren’t damaged in the process, and speed is of course preferable for mass production. The 3D printable bioink from UCL is made from hyaluronic acid – a key ingredient in skin, connective tissues and the nervous system. A photoinitator is added to the acid so that it solidifies when in contact with light. This mixture is used to fill preformed tablets displaying the properties of an atypical oral tablet.

Read the full article here.

Porous 3D printed scaffolds help Rice University scientists tackle bone cancer

Scientists at Rice University in Houston have used 3D printing to create porous, bone-like scaffolds that can be used to study bone cancer tumors. They found that the size and orientation of individual pores affected how cells proliferate in the absence of blood. According to bioengineer Antonios Mikos, the 3D printed polymer bone scaffold contains artificial pores that constrain the flow of fluid and apply shear stress to tumor cells […] The scientists believe that this model could be vital for finding out more about bone cancer and potential treatments: “We aim to develop tumor models that can capture the complexity of tumors in vitro and can be used for drug testing, thus providing a platform for drug development while reducing the associated cost,” Mikos said.

Read the full article here.

3D Printing the Future of Surgery

One of the most hotly anticipated areas for 3D printing to impact is medicine. A myriad of stories have appeared pointing to all manner of exciting innovations in the medical field. Sadly many of the “3D printed ear/nose/heart/ etc.” stories have been rather disingenuous or are at the very least very optimistic. To give you a more accurate view of the possibilities of 3D printing in medicine we’ll look at one particular area: surgery.

Read how AM is and will transform the surgical world on 3DPrint.

 

As always, don’t forget to follow us on Twitter to receive more news that don’t make the cut to the weekly report and come back next week for another News-In-Review!

Big Data to tackle Big Problems (Authentise Weekly News-In-Review – Week 06)

Hi and welcome to another edition of the News-In-Review, brought to you by Authentise!

The computational power at our disposal is increasing exponentially, being that of the phone in our pockets or the super-computer of the country next door. In our interconnected world, data is engulfing everything (as highlighted in our Week 3 edition). This week we propose how the two are coming together to address the great problems in our world, from national resource management to safer and more accurate than ever 3D printing. As IIoT is embedded in the national grid, it’s changing from a rigid, failure prone network to an efficient, system optimized in real time approach thanks to data-driven analytics. Processing that data requires new IT innovations, such as the first exascale super-computer now built in Chian. This, previously unattainable computational power allows us to simulate better 3D printing designs, materials and processes and can be used to unlock more AM use cases, such as construction.

As ever, there’s a lot to cover here. Let’s jump in!

Big Water – Big Data Is Reshaping The Water Industry

Data management, exploratory analytics, data visualization and predictive algorithms enable the discovery of important behavioral characteristics of highly‐complex urban infrastructure. Water management relies on heavy physical infrastructure and reactive administration. This changes with the development of cyber-physical systems, real-time monitoring, big data analysis and predictive machine learning algorithms and the IoT. These systems enable a transition from reacting to optimized, proactive and cost-efficient management processes.

Check out the full article here.

World’s First Exascale Supercomputer to Enhance 3D Printing Capabilities

The Tianhe-2 Super Computer

China’s National Supercomputer Centre announced that the prototype for its exascale supercomputer will be completed later this year, ahead of its initial date in 2018. The successful performance and commercialization of the computer is presumed to drastically improve existing 3D printing or additive manufacturing methods. […] Through the usage of an exascale computing-based application, manufacturers will be able to use additive manufacturing technologies to better simulate end products and significantly optimize processes before the last stage of manufacturing.

Read the full article here.

Building by numbers: how 3D printing is shaking up the construction industry

Stewart Williams [admits] that quality control represents a major challenge [to the building industry]. To be viable, any printed building technique will have systems that can constantly monitor and inspect the materials as they are being produced. As he notes wryly: “You wouldn’t want to build a massive beam and get to the end and find you’ve got some holes in it.” Assuming regulators can be convinced, the potential upsides of 3D printing for the construction industry could be huge. Among the factors in the technology’s favor are productivity gains, reduced labor costs and safer working environments, as well as the sort of one-off, complex building designs that are not technically and economically feasible at present.

Read the whole article at the Guardian.

 

As always, be sure to follow us on Twitter to get the rest of the juicy news we share and come back next week to another edition of the News-In-Review!

Getting AM primed for industies through collaborations (Authentise Weekly News-In-Review – Week 05)

Hello to all our good readers, welcome to 2017th fifth weekly News-In-Review!

From our insider’s vantage point we’ve observed for some time how AM is getting geared up for the performance standards of industrial deployment. The steady process of refinement of the various technologies in the 3D printing world has been possible thanks to the ongoing host of collaborations and projects that helped tackle the issues AM still faces. We could not get a better example that this week’s numerous news on the topic:

Audi has announced a partnership with EOS to integrate AM in their business and, at the same time, McLaren sings a similar partnership with Stratasys to bring AM-enabled car components to the F1 track. The fruits of one such collaboration are already ripe for Airbus, which has been in the testing stage with Sciaky for quite some time and is now ready to implement the latter’s huge EBAM printer in their aircraft manufacturing process. To note there is also Lloyd’s Register Energy and TWI who launched two collaborative global projects which will help the international community identify the technological standards needed for AM to scale to the industrial setting.

If it looks like a lot to cover it’s because it is! So, without further ado, let’s dig in.

 

Audi announce partnership with German 3D printing company EOS

Automotive manufacturer Audi has announced a new partnership agreement with fellow German company, 3D printer manufacturers EOS. The use of additive manufacturing will be used for, “equipment and prototype building at Audi, as well as motor sports, where the technology is already in use today.” Güngör Kara, Director of Global Application and Consulting at EOS, explained how the agreement will move Audi forward: “The aim is to not only supply Audi with the right additive systems and processes but to also support them during applications development, when building up internal AM knowledge and training their engineers to become in-house AM experts.”

Read more about the partnership here.

Stratasys Signs Four-Year Partnership with McLaren Racing as Official Supplier of 3D Printing Solutions

John Cooper, Commercial and Finance Director, McLaren Racing (l) and Ilan Levin, Stratasys CEO (r)

[Stratasys] is going to the races: to bring additive manufacturing to the track, it has announced a new four-year partnership with McLaren Racing. Stratasys will work as the Official Supplier of 3D Printing Solutions to the McLaren Honda Formula 1 team, and provide the team with additive manufacturing and 3D printing solutions. The company will assist the Formula 1 team in elevating its capacity for rapid manufacturing at the McLaren Technology Center in Woking, UK. In a way, Stratasys will operate as a 3D printing pit crew for McLaren Racing.

Read the full article here.

Airbus To 3-D Print Airframe Structures

Airbus is installing a large additive manufacturing machine [Sciaky‘s EBAM 110] at a production site in France to 3D print titanium aircraft structural parts for its aircraft. [John O’Hara, director of global sales] says the qualification work completed so far shows EBAM can produce components that meet or exceed the properties of forged parts. Printing rather than forging these parts avoids the long lead times and the waste of expensive metal involved in machining finished parts from forgings. With its high deposition rates, the wire-fed EBAM can produce parts in hours or days, versus weeks or months, he says. “We provided thousands of pounds to Airbus before the deal was signed,” O’Hara reiterates. “They know where this is going.”

Read more about it here (registration needed).

Lloyd’s Register Energy Partners with TWI to Launch Two Collaborative Global Projects Focused on Industrial Additive Manufacturing Challenges

lloyds-register_additive_manufacturing_laser_rim

[Lloyd’s Register Energy (LR)] has teamed up with leading research and technology organization The Welding Institute (TWI) to launch two new collaborative projects that will help companies more fully integrate additive manufacturing. The first of LR and TWI’s new projects, “Achieving Regulatory and Code Compliance for Additive Manufacturing,” will “investigate the routes to regulatory compliance of parts selected by project sponsors, and will produce data and assessment criteria for the introduction and acceptance of parts through third-party inspection.”

Read more about the project at 3DPrint.

 

Don’t forget to follow us on Twitter and come back next week for another edition of News-In-Review!

IIoT engulfs the world, is the world ready? (Authentise Weekly News-In-Review – Week 04)

Hi everyone and welcome to this new edition of your weekly News-In-Review by Authentise!

We are switching the release date to Sunday from now on so tune in every weekend to get your curated news report.

This week we filled our feeds with news coming from the IIoT world. More & more resources are poured by industrial players to get ahead in the race to ride the sensor-empowered wave of IIoT but there is more to do hiding in the avalanche of data that is coming out of it. While Frankfurt showcases industry 4.0 in its privileged spot as Europe’s main internet hub and key players’ collaborations take the IIoT ecosystem up a notch, the data shows early adopters can’t seem to create actionable insights out of it all. As IIoT engulfs the industrial world in data, smart process development driven by analytics is key to make use of the incredible information capacity in our hands.

Frankfurt factory showcases Industry 4.0

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Frankfurt is the world’s largest internet hub – and with volume doubling every year, companies are turning to the latest technology. That was the starting point for one German company – which has built a factory to show what’s possible.

Click here to see the article and video.

Honeywell and Aeron collaborate

Honeywell has announced that it will collaborate with Aereon on solutions to help industrial customers boost the safety, efficiency and reliability of their operations by leveraging Honeywell’s Industrial Internet of Things (IIoT) ecosystem. The INspire™ ecosystem is a part of Honeywell’s Connected Plant initiative, which helps manufacturers leverage the IIoT to improve the safety, efficiency and reliability of operations across a single plant or several plants within an enterprise. Honeywell and its ecosystem partners are developing infrastructure that offers customers secure methods to capture and aggregate data, and apply advanced analytics. Customers can then use this information to determine methods to reduce or eliminate manufacturing upsets and inefficiencies.

Click here to read more about the collaboration.

Making Sense of IIoT Analytics

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As the Industrial Internet of Things (IIoT) picks up steam, attention is pivoting from connectivity to analytics, flooding manufacturers with a wave of new offerings that all promise to facilitate real business change. […] “It’s really easy to capture data, but to then make that data actionable is where companies are really struggling,” notes Ryan Lester, director of IoT strategy for Xively, an IoT platform provider. “Companies don’t have the right analytics tools to parse through the data and they don’t have access to good algorithms to get insights.” In fact, according to research by Forrester and Xively, 51% of companies are collecting data from connected products, but only 33% are leveraging the intelligence to create actionable insights.

Click here to know more of IIoT analytics.

 

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Facing New Dynamics With Technology (Authentise Weekly News-In-Review – Week 03)

Hi and welcome to another edition of the News-In-Review!

On the eve of President-elect Trump’s inauguration, dozens of companies are announcing that they are keeping manufacturing jobs in the US, creating them, or bringing it back: Ford, Alibaba, and Amazon among them. In fact, this is a long term trend: We highlighted a FastCompany article that revealed that apparel manufacturing in the US went up by 35% since 2009. But why? It’s not because customers are expecting improved personalization options (they’re not really), and it doesn’t seem to be about taking advantage of new technologies such as 3D printing. Instead, we think it’s the need to stay agile to consumer needs, and that’s best done by empowering your operators with the new opportunities cloud+data provide. Read our CEO’s latest LinkedIn post below and find out more.

The Uneasy Truth Behind Amazon’s Hiring Blitz And What Startups Are Doing To Fix It

Today, Amazon announced that it will create 100,000 full-time, full-benefit jobs in the United States over the next 18 months. The jobs, Amazon says, will range from entry-level positions to software development roles. The announcement is designed to play nicely into President-elect Trump’s rhetoric about bringing more jobs back to our shores, but it’s important to remember that Amazon’s business model is premised on increasing automation wherever possible, which means replacing more and more humans with machines.

Read the full article at FastCompany.

The dream of Ara: Inside the rise and fall of the world’s most revolutionary phone

In a very personal and thorough recollection of the bold project of modular phone Ara we get a glimpse into how AM was scrapped from the manufacturing plans. “[Paul] Eremenko cut ties with one of Ara’s earliest supporters, 3DSystems, scrapping the project’s dependence on rapid 3D printing for a dye sublimation process. 3DSystems’ printers were too slow, and the new system could adorn modules with selfies and pets.”

Read the full story here.

Trust your People.

People who run manufacturing, sales, logistics or many other core functions in supply chain know how important their team members are: How much they know, how many ideas they have to drive more efficient operations – yet how they have long been stifled by rules, ignored by managers and brushed aside by support staff. No wonder people become demoralised. Modern software tools should be providing relief. Alas, the most recent industrial IoT examples such as GE’s Predix show that this trend looks set to continue. Data Scientists lead IoT projects that get the data to tell them where the problems are rather than asking the people on the front line what stops them from being better at their job. Their findings are enshrined in IT systems as rules not to be tampered with. IIoT is the buzzword, but we are not sure that people are looking at it the right way.

Read the full article on LinkedIn.

 

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