Preparing for Next-Gen Manufacturing (Authentise Weekly News-In-Review – Week 31)

Over the course of the last century, manufacturing has begun a downward dive in reputation, leading to less interest in the industry as a career path and, consequently, to broader ignorance in its developments, but there are ways to fix that. As a result, the industry is experiencing a skill-gap in its prospecting professionals who are not being prepared for the jobs of tomorrow. This is apparent in AM, as businesses are still encouraged to “work with the willing, and go from there”, but a lot of projects are starting to deal with this lack in education. Automation is engulfing the production pipeline and many businesses are not sure where to even begin investing their time and resources to start embracing IIoT and other smart technologies.

How to Fix Manufacturing’s Poor Image

How to Fix Manufacturing’s Poor Image

U.S. manufacturing suffers from an important image problem that undermines its competitiveness, according to a new survey released on July 13 by Deloitte, along with the Manufacturing Institute. Only 50% of Americans think manufacturing jobs are interesting and less than 30% are likely to encourage their children to pursue a career. However Americans have not yet given up hope on the industry and in fact are overwhelmingly optimistic for its future […] much needs to be done to make sure that the public, including educators and those in a position to guide talent to the industry, understand the facts, the report concludes.

Read more about the findings in the Deloitte report here.

Overcoming the Additive Manufacturing Skill Gap

Chris has been working as a machinist in the advanced manufacturing realm for 47 years. He’s regularly involved in Imperial’s most difficult Additive projects.

How does a company owner find experienced talent in an industry that’s only a few years old? This is the problem early adopters of Metal Additive Manufacturing are trying to solve. […] Indeed, additive is already playing an important role in the advanced manufacturing world, but there’s an unresolved pain-point felt across the industry; a small pool of skilled AM professionals, trying to satisfy the workforce needs of a rapidly growing industry.

Read the full article here.

Automation in the Warehouse: Asset or Obstacle?

Automation is a powerful tool and comes in many shapes and forms. In the warehouse, automation is generally used to make gains upon existing processes by improving efficiency, speed, reliability, accuracy and (eventually) cost savings. Gone are the days of thinking that paper-based processes are enough. Automation is at everyone’s disposal, yet investing in it doesn’t mean it will solve every goods-handling issue or be the right fit. Humans are still better at a lot of things.

Read more on smart automation deployment here.

 

As always, we hope to see you next week for another edition of the News-In-Review! In the mean time, our Twitter feed will keep you topped up on AM and IIoT related news, so check that out as well!

Beyond Bioprinting: The Way Ahead In Biological AM (Authentise Weekly News-In-Review – Week 30)

Welcome to our 30th News In Review for 2017!

We’ve all heard of the 3D printed heart and ear tissue. There is much more to bioprinting than these initial steps and, thanks to new technologies, explorations and endeavors, the road ahead is looking a whole lot more exciting. New technologies enable researchers with nanoscale control of the manufacturing environment, both low-powered and more precise, to create bioprinted scaffolds for a variety of uses. Synthetic biologist will surely make good use of the new tech: 3D printed bioreactors can be manufactured to generate specific kinds of biologic products, like proteins of even antibiotics. Bioprinting is skyrocketing, beyond the confines of our atmosphere. NASA has revealed plans to bring bioprinted cancer cells to the ISS in order to study potential treatments in a controlled, zero-g environment.

Light-directed assembly using gold nano-rods opens up 3D bioprinting applications

Using gold nano rods and near infrared laser for bioprinting

[…] the use of high-powered lasers to pattern micro/nanoscale objects has drawbacks. In particular, the substantial energy required to move material or objects means that high throughput of material is not possible. Now a team at the National University of Singapore have announced another technique to engineer living tissue. In the paper “Effective Light Directed Assembly of Building Blocks with Microscale Control” a method for improving control over the micro structure with light-directed assembly is described. The researchers believe their method could have applications for bioprinting, tissue engineering, and advanced manufacturing. Working with microfluidic-fabricated monodispersed biocompatible microparticles the scientists were able to fabricate a structure.

Check out the rest of the article here.

A better way to make drinks and drugs

Carefully selected molds churn out antibiotics. Specially engineered bacteria, living in high-tech bioreactors, pump out proteinaceous drugs such as insulin. Some brave souls even talk of taking on the petroleum industry by designing yeast or algae that will synthesize alternatives to aviation fuel and the like. Dr Nelson’s bioreactors are composed of a substance called a hydrogel, which is about 70% water. The remaining 30% is a special polymer, infused with yeast. [It can] be extruded smoothly through the nozzle of a 3D printer.The fun starts when such a [hydrogel] cube is plopped into a solution of glucose. The hydrogel is permeable to this solution, so the yeast is able to get to work on the glucose, converting it into ethanol as if it were the sugar in the wort of a brewery. […] The surprise was that it keeps on doing so, day after day, week after week, as long as the fermented solution is regularly replaced with fresh. The team’s bioreactors have continued to produce ethanol in this way for over four months now, with no signs of slowing down.

Read the full article on The Economist’s website.

NASA to take cancer fight into space with bioprinted cells

A BioCell which can contain six samples. Photo via BioServe.

NASA has revealed plans to grow bioprinted cancer cells in space in a bid to advance cancer research. Utilizing the microgravity environment, NASA hopes to the cell structures will grow in a more natural spherical shape. Since, back on earth in vitro the cells have only able been able to grow in two-dimensional layers. However to harness the cells without the presence of gravity, NASA is hoping to employ magnets.

Read more about NASA’s plans here.

 

This is it for this week, don’t forget to check out our Twitter, Facebook and Linkedin feeds for more news on the AM/IIoT world as well as updates to our services.

See you next week!

The Hybrid Future in Human-Robot Relationships (Authentise Weekly News-In-Review – Week 29)

The manufacturing plant is now more than ever the product of synergies derived from multiple, different actors playing their part for the greater objective. There is no “killer app” in the manufacturing industry and AM will need traditional manufacturing just as much as robots will still need human input to get around their limitations. The non-zero-sum game nature of manufacturing is exemplified by the international efforts to find balances in which new production processes can get the best of both worlds. For example, 11 partner groups from Germany and the Netherlands are starting new research efforts to explore the potential of hybrid manufacturing, particularly helpful for complex products like electronics. On a broader perspective, human-robot relationships have never been stronger. Those people afraid of giving up their jobs to robotic counterparts can put their hearts at ease (for now): automation is bringing greater productivity by putting tireless androids able to execute the most boring tasks under the human supervision. Similarly, deep learning automation is helping businesses deploy their time and resources more intelligently, using machine vision and actuation where the humans could be better employed doing something higher level.

German company Neotech AMT announces two new fully additive 3D printed electronics projects

A circuit board created using 3D printing technology. Image via Neotech.

German electronic 3D printing company Neotech AMT GmbH has announced it will engage in two new projects to advance additive manufacturing. The first project, known as ‘Hyb-Man’, will bring together 11 partner groups from Germany and the Netherlands with the aim of developing hybrid manufacturing techniques. While the second project – AMPECS – will focus on the printing of ceramic substrates.

The resultant process lines will address the needs for low volume agile manufacture within a single platform. – Dr. Martin Hedges, Managing Director of Neotech

Read more about the projects here.

Online Retail Boom Means More Warehouse Workers, And Robots To Accompany Them

There’s a good chance something you’ve bought online has been in the hands of a “picker” first. These are the workers in warehouses who pick, pack and ship all those things we’re ordering. At Amazon and other companies, they’re working side by side with robots. Experts say while the robots are replacing some human workers, the machines aren’t quite ready to take over completely.

Read the full article at NPR.

Two Apple Engineers Want To Create The Brain For Fully-Automated Manufacturing

Assembling TV sets

Anna-Katrina Shedletsky, along with another former Apple engineer, Samuel Weiss, have founded manufacturing startup Instrumental. The Los Altos, California-based startup builds a camera system that takes high-definition pictures of the product during various stages of the assembly process and sends it back to the company. Instrumental software then lets companies remotely track how their products are being assembled. But the bigger picture vision for the company is introducing more automation into what is a still very manual process. Instrumental has begun deploying machine learning techniques to pick out any manufacturing anomalies and track where things go wrong.

Read more about Instrumental and their goals here.

 

We hope to see you again next week as we publish another edition of our News-In-Review! Also, check out our Twitter feed for more AM/Automation/IIoT related news and insights.

Safety & Security Angles of 3D Printing (Authentise Weekly News-In-Review – Week 28)

There has been much talk in recent years about what AM can accomplish. Likewise, the community is starting to take into consideration different sides of the equation. The health-related safety of the printing process has been often put under the media’s spotlight and questioned: a 2 years investigation conducted by Underwriters Laboratories (UL) and other institutes has provided a thorough answer to put everyone’s mind at ease. Also, as new frontiers of cybersecurity are exposing the risks involved in a digital manufacturing pipeline, the US Navy is exploring blockchain technologies to secure its IPs and production processes from outside interference. Nonetheless, AM is also fuelling safe practices, enabling University of Pittsburgh Swanson School of Engineering researchers to develop nuclear sensors that will be able to withstand the prohibitive environments within a nuclear reactor. Advanced situational awareness is critical to the safe operation of nuclear reactors, a lesson we learned at our expense in the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear disaster in 2011.

Is 3D printing safe? UL publishes Safety Science of 3D Printing

Assessing the powders at the CMU lab. Photo via CMU College of Engineering.

The short answer to the question, Is 3D printing safe? YesMarilyn Black, Ph.D. VP & Senior Technical Advisor, UL Inc calls for a “standardized method for measuring and assessing the emissions released during printing.” In a welcome to the study Black explains, “This will allow for consistent and comparative data to be obtained from laboratories, machine manufacturers, and suppliers of filaments.”

Published as the proceedings of the Safety Science of 3D Printing Summit held in Atlanta, Georgia earlier this year, the authors:

“hope this exchange of information will enable more collaborative discussions, research, innovation, informed policy advancement, and science based initiatives leading to the safe of use 3D printers.”

Read the article here and the entire study right here.

US Navy to employ blockchain to control 3D printers

The USS Gerald R. Ford. Image via the U.S Navy.

The U.S Department of the Navy (DoN) has revealed plans to use a blockchain to control its 3D printers. Lieutenant Commander Jon McCarter has now revealed in a blog post that the DoN will begin trialing blockchain this summer before issuing a report in September on the proof-of-concept. Blockchain is an example of a decentralized network which means data is shared across the network and not secured in one location.

By having a distributed network in this way the Navy can “both securely share data between Additive Manufacturing sites, as well as help secure the digital thread of design and production.”

Read more about the project here.

DoE grants University of Pittsburgh $1.3 million for 3D printed nuclear sensors

Inside the Unit 2 cooling tower at the DoE's Watts Bar Nuclear Plant. Photo by Mark Zaleski/AP

he University of Pittsburgh Swanson School of Engineering has won a grant of $1.275 million from the U.S. Department of Energy (DoE). The fund will support research into the development of additive manufacturing techniques to make electrical sensors – used to monitor conditions inside nuclear turbines.

At the time of this initial grant, Dr. Kevin Chen [the Paul E. Lego Professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering at UPitt who will lead the project] explained the necessity of nuclear sensor systems,

An important lesson of the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear disaster in 2011 is the lack of situation awareness of nuclear power systems especially under stressed or severe situations. When the plant was evacuated following the earthquake and tsunami, we lost the ability to know what was happening in key systems. This information blackout prevented the implementation of proper control mechanisms, which then triggered a disastrous chain of events.

Read more about it here.

 

That’s it, don’t forget to come back next week for another dose of the News-In-Review and also to check our Twitter feed!

Innovation Hubs, focusing on the AM of tomorrow (Authentise Weekly News-In-Review – Week 27)

It is certain that AM is now becoming a staple of every product development laboratory on the planet. Some companies are taking their position to a whole new level by putting efforts and resources in AM innovation hubs. These facilities elevate the ability to delve deeper into AM, both in the present product development and in technology research for tomorrow’s machines. Private companies, like Parker Hannifin, are investing big in new facilities which will allow their engineers to explore new applications of emerging technologies and up their industrial advantage. On a larger scale, the UAE has recently opened their first ever 3D printing facility, part of a strategy to be world leaders in AM by 2030. By focusing so much on the capabilities of AM, businesses can come up with novel products for their market: Michelin came up with a new concept tire entirely revolving on 3D printing technology.

Parker Opens New Additive Manufacturing Facility to Accelerate Innovation in Product Design and Manufacturing

Parker Additive Manufacturing Facility

Parker Hannifin Corporation, the global leader in motion and control technologies, has opened a new state-of-the-art advanced manufacturing learning and development center […]. The facility will serve as a center of excellence where Parker engineers can explore new applications of emerging technologies such as additive manufacturing and collaborative robotics.

“Material printing technology is moving quickly towards commercial viability,” said Craig Maxwell, Vice President – Chief Technology and Innovation Officer. “The new facility and engineering talent located here represent an investment in the future of manufacturing.”

Read more here.

Launch of UAE’s first-ever 3D printing facility with Immensa Labs

SLS parts produced by Immensa Labs. Photo via Emirates 24/7.

The facility, which is based in Dubai, is part of the Dubai 3D printing strategy which was launched by Sheikh Mohammed bin Rashid Al Maktoum, Vice President and Prime Minister of UAE and Ruler of Dubai. The strategy aims to promote global implementation of 3D printing “for the service of humanity and promote the status of the UAE and Dubai as a leading hub of 3D printing technology by the year 2030.”

There are ample opportunities for organisations in the UAE to adopt AM to enhance their efficiencies and competitiveness, and we are focused on providing world-class and viable 3D printing solutions. – Fahmi Al-Shawwa, CEO of Immensa Technology Labs

Read more about the lab here.

Michelin unveils airless, biodegradable, 3D printed concept tire

The VISION concept tire. Photo via Jimmy Hamelin/Michelin.

At its International Mobility summit, Movin On, French tire manufacturer Michelin unveiled a new concept tire that is both airless and created with a 3D printer. Announcing the tire this week in Montreal, Canada, Michelin proposes a design for the future of sustainable mobility. The tire is rechargeable, biodegradable, complete with sensors for real-time monitoring, and claims to be completely 3D printed.

[…]VISION is possible since it is based on R&D know-how and we can already see the future applications, on which the Group is now working. It’s a promise that is within reach. – Mostapha El-Oulhani, Head of VISION Project

Read more about the concept tire here.

That’s it for this week, don’t forget to come back next week for another edition. In the mean time, our Twitter feed will be giving you constant updates on our services as well as the AM/IIoT world so come check it out!

Automation, analyzing our hands-free future (Authentise Weekly News-In-Review – Week 26)

This week we are going to take a look at what automation is doing to our current socio-economical global landscape. It has pervaded the news with its most face-value effect of taking over manual human jobs, which it undoubtedly is: what the public is missing is a clear overview of the far-reaching effects. For example, automation will be able to provide a cushion for the ageing demographic of those countries who are dragging the economic growth. Presently, automation technologies and IIoT are bringing more to the table than raw workforce, exposing unconventional growth vectors to businesses. Automation is also hinting at a possible future in which jobs could be erased, urging a new definition of the individual’s social and economic contribution.

Robots May Help Defuse Demographic Time Bomb in Germany, Japan

robots welding at VW factory

Japan and Germany may be sitting on a ticking demographic time bomb where aging populations begin to drag down economic growth. Good thing they’re also prime candidates for robot revolutions. Increased automation and more use of robotic technology in these manufacturing powerhouses could help cushion the impact, according to Moody’s Investors Service.

Moody’s analysts wrote in the report this month:

“To the extent that robots can undertake activity that require labor, they will compensate for the negative impact that a slower growth in labor force would have otherwise had on growth.”

Read more about it on Industry Week.

Driving Unconventional Growth through the Industrial Internet of Things

Screen Shot 2017-06-17 at 10.17.26 PM

The IIoT has been heralded primarily as a way to improve operational efficiency. But in today’s environment, companies can also benefit greatly by seeing it as a tool for finding growth in unexpected opportunities.
In the future, successful companies will use the Industrial Internet of Things to capture new growth through three approaches: boost revenues by increasing production and creating new hybrid business models, exploit intelligent technologies to fuel innovation, and transform their workforce.

Read the report by Accenture.

Technology Will Erase Jobs—But Also Make Everything Cheap or Free

At Singularity University’s Exponential Finance Summit in New York this week, [Peter] Diamandis talked about the broad and specific trends he believes are leading to a demonetized world. […] The counterbalance to technological unemployment, Diamandis said, is the demonetization of living—in other words, pretty much everything we need and do in our day-to-day lives is becoming radically cheaper, if not free, and technology’s making it happen.

Read the whole article at SingularityHub.

 

Hope to see you again next week for another installment of the News-In-Review, don’t forget to follow us on Twitter and other social media for a more frequent flux of AM & IIoT news!

Quality assurance will guarantee AM’s future (Authentise Weekly News-In-Review – Week 25)

AM is transforming the way engineers approach a design problem with enhanced manufacturing possibilities. Nonetheless, there are some crucial steps that need to be taken in order to make AM safe and reliable enough to meet industry standards. Already the scene is making giant strides in its effort to assure quality and the main areas to consider are three: CAD models preparation, AM material inspection and in-print monitoring. Better hardware and dedicated software by Nvidia is making dealing with complex designs much more efficient, unconstrained by performance issues and with new tools to approach AM-specific design issues. Powder micro-structure needs to be within certain parameters for optimal sintering: Carnegie Mellon developed a machine-vision system to classify AM metal powders. For in-print monitoring, GE published new patents to determine the quality of a print from acoustic signatures during the process.

Authentise has developed platforms that take advantage of every major monitoring device. Companies like Nike and Ricoh are using this data-enriched perspective to make smarter decisions on their manufacturing operations.

Read more about it here!

How GPUs Can Kick 3D Printing Industry Into High Gear

GVDB Voxels printed a 3D statue (L) of a complex image (R) with minimal materials and structural support.

At last month’s GPU Technology Conference, HP Labs and NVIDIA described how they’ve worked together to overcome these challenges using NVIDIA’s new GVDB Voxel open source software development kit. […] Hoetzlein said the SDK is designed for simple efficient computation, simulation and rendering, even when there’s sparse volumetric data. It includes a compute API that generates high-resolution data and requires minimal memory footprint, and a rendering API that supports development of CUDA and NVIDIA OptiX pathways, allowing users to write custom rendering kernels.

Read more on NVIDIA’s blog.

Carnegie Mellon develops machine vision autonomous system for metal 3D printing

Assessing the powders at the CMU lab. Photo via CMU College of Engineering.

Research from Carnegie Mellon University’s (CMU) College of Engineering has developed an autonomous system for classifying the metal powders used for 3D printing. Using machine vision technology, the system can identify specific microstructures in the additive manufacturing metal powders with an accuracy of greater than 95%. Metal powders are used in powder bed fusion 3D printers. Understanding the quality of the material is essential to the integrity of the resulting parts. The CMU engineers expect their system to be applied by the 3D printing industry within the next five years as part of the Carnegie Mellon University’s NextManufacturing Center aims.

Read the full article here.

GE publishes patents for powder bed fusion acoustic monitoring processes to qualify metal 3D printed parts

Direct Metal Laser Melting solution from GE Additive. Photo via GE Reports/Chris New

GE has published two patents for additive manufacturing acoustic monitoring processes. Referring specifically to powder-bed fusion techniques, GE hopes to simplify the qualification of printed parts with an in-situ monitoring method using acoustic waves. In turn, the company intends to improve the workflow of 3D printing functional metal parts. […] According to the patent, the acoustic monitoring process may take place upon completion of the build or it, “may take place in real time.” It uses a “known good” (fig. 4)workpiece as comparison, which means the acoustic profile generated by the sensors is compared to the profile of the already qualified part.

Read more about the patent here.

 

Don’t forget to come back next week for another News-In-Review and to check our Twitter feed for more AM and IIoT related news and Authentise service updates!

AM, bringing In-Situ manufacturing to a facility near you! (Authentise Weekly News-In-Review – Week 24)

In the comfort of our daily lives, we often take for granted some of the services and perks of our industrious world. We are getting really good at managing the complex scenarios of a global economy where any kind of goods must be shipped and handled efficiently but, still, it’s driving a decisive cost factor in every business. Logistics is inherently complicated but, with AM decentralizing manufacturing capabilities, this is about to change, drastically. In-situ manufacturing is a game-changer in a wide variety of cases. Bespoke replacement parts, like Daimler is doing with its buses, can be produced as needed, driving down storage and production expenses. The Australian DOD is developing a program to deploy 3D printing on the front lines, vastly improving the base’s flexibility in addressing its needs. It goes as far as the ISS, where astronauts will 3D print habitat’s radiation shields through it’s on-board AM device, saving millions on resupply launches.

Daimler Buses implements 3D printing to produce bespoke Mercedes-Benz parts

Daimler Buses, parent company of Mercedes-Benz and Setra, has explained how it is implementing 3D printing to create components for its customers on-demand. Providing the example of a banknote stowage compartment, Daimler has showcased how it is utilizing the technology to create bespoke parts. According to Daimler, the company has so far 3D printed 780 components with over 150 replacement parts currently undergoing validation.

Hartmut Schick, Head of Daimler Buses, explains how 3D printing is advancing production of spare parts at the company,

The 3D printing process allows us to install local printers at the production plants operated by Daimler Buses worldwide. It also enables us to respond in a flexible manner at local level to customers’ special wishes and replacement part needs.

Read the full article at 3D Printing Industry.

Australian Department of Defence develops 3D printing programme for fixing frontline aircraft

A jet in the Australian Airforce. Photo via @DeptDefence on Twitter

The Defence Science and Technology Group (DST Group) of the Australian Department of Defence (DoD) has developed a 3D printing programme for fixing and strengthening aircraft parts. The technology is used in response to craft on the frontline of defence therefore, according to national security intelligence site Jane’s 360“boosting the operational ability of military aerospace platforms.” 

Defence researcher, Kevin Walker, explains,

Repairing existing parts (as opposed to manufacturing new parts) is often a more cost effective and efficient way of keeping military aircraft in the air. In conjunction with RMIT and industry partners, we have developed laser-based additive manufacturing repairs that can remediate faults such as corrosion, wear and fatigue cracking.

Read the full article here.

ISS Bigelow Expandable Activity Module gets 3D printed radiation shields after passing space debris tests

The Bigelow Expandable Activity Module (BEAM), a modular habitat attached to the International Space Station, has passed a first round of tests concerning its resistance to space debris. 3D printed radiation shields will now be added to the module for extra protection against cosmic rays […] printed on the International Space Station’s Made In Space Additive Manufacturing Facility (AMF) 3D printer. Researchers on the project concluded that 3D printed radiation shields were “affordable and optimal at all scales ranging from Cubesats to interplanetary manned missions.”

Read more about the ISS project here.

 

Check us out on Twitter! There you’ll find more than your usual News-In-Review, a recollection of AM & IIoT news and every update to Authentise services.

IIoT, stepping stones to a smarter manufacturing framework (Authentise Weekly News-In-Review – Week 23)

Every business, in manufacturing and otherwise, is coming face to face to the reality of present day interconnected capabilities. The Industrial Internet of Things is often described as the next logical step of the industrial world: after hardware automation comes smart, data-driven, connected way of doing things. The possibilities are astounding and, for many businesses, daunting to achieve, fearful as they are of investing time and money in systems and practices they don’t really understand. Fortunately, first steps are relatively easy to make: Sensors are becoming extremely cheap, making the hardware investment very feasible. “Digital twins” are an example of intuitive, data-driven interfaces for predictive enterprise management. We’re also lowering barriers by becoming more sophisticated: Edge computing lightens the network’s costs compared to trying to eat the cake whole.

PS: Check out what Authentise is doing with IIOT – connecting printers to drive automation and insight for additive manufacturing . 

Research proposes 3D printed sensors to work as warnings in extreme environmental conditions

Researchers at King Abdullah University of Science and Technology, have used 3D Printed sensors to test for levels indicative of forest fires and industrial leaks. This photo is of a controlled fire by Sustainable Resource Alberta, started to promote diversity and create a wall to future fires. Photo by Cameron Strandberg, 38449766@N03 on Flickr

A research team from King Abdullah University of Science and Technology (KAUST) in Saudi Arabia, has published a paper proposing 3D printed disposable and wireless sensors for monitoring large areas. The proof-of-concept study shows the potential of 3D printing as a low-cost method of making fully integrated wireless sensors, which can be utilized in extreme environmental conditions such as forest fires and industrial leaks.

Read the rest of the article here.

Seeing double–digital twins & the future of IIoT

DigitalTwin

Digital twin technology has been trending in the news for quite a while, yet it should be no surprise that it’s in the Industrial Internet of Things where the concept of a virtual representation of a physical product or system will be the most valuable. The digital twin paradigm enables manufacturers to do two things–operate factories efficiently and gain timely insights into the performance of the products manufactured in these factories.

Read more about “Digital Twins” on Smart Industry.

Three reasons why edge architectures are critical for IIoT

[IIoT] data is only valuable if it can be accessed and acted upon quickly, efficiently and safely. Effectively accessing data can be especially challenging when you have “things” — such as sensors, devices, flow computers and more — that live on remote areas of the network. […] The data from these remote sites has the potential to generate valuable business, but is often too far away, too expensive or too insecure to transmit for time-critical operations. Edge computing devices can solve the challenge of making this data available in real time.

Read more at IoT Agenda.

 

Keep following us on Twitter, where we share interesting news and updates to our services, and be sure to come back next week for another edition of the News-In-Review!

Automation and the role of the human (Authentise Weekly News-In-Review – Week 22)

Automation is an unstoppable force for change within pretty much every advanced human industry. It has already been reported that it’s having an impact on low-skilled jobs. Nonetheless, there are many other implications to automation are tremendous. The ability to gather data from distant, and often dangerous, environments without human intervention is no small feat, as is the uplifted capability to simulate and analyze factories’ digital twins in order to obtain predictive insights. A changing scenario brings about new opportunities for improvement: IIoT solutions need to be kept updated to new cyber security standards and much work can still be done to improve the benefits of such solutions. There’s clearly still a lot of work for humans to do. Researchers are needed now more than ever to create the building blocks of the automation future, one that is already here but has still a long way to go.

PS: Have you seen the chapter on Cyberphysical security for Industry 4.0  that our CTO and CEO co- wrote?

New Study Finds That Six Jobs Are Lost for Every Robot Added to the Workforce

Screen Shot 2017-05-20 at 3.34.38 PM

Now, a new paper released by the National Bureau of Economic Research (NBER) puts an actual number to the threat of automation: each industrial robot introduced in the workforce between 1990 and 2007 coincided with the elimination of 6.2 jobs within the commuting area. Wages also saw a slight drop of between .25-.50% per 1,000 employees when one or more robots was added to their workforce.

Read the full article at Futurism.

Seeing double — digital twins & the future of IIoT

DigitalTwin

Digital twin technology has been trending in the news for quite a while, yet it should be no surprise that it’s in IIoT where the concept of a virtual representation of a physical product or system will be the most valuable. The digital twin has a natural home in the IIoT. The components of a CAD model–the design parameters, the operating state, the environment–can all be elements of the digital twin representation. Think of the twin as a body where nerve endings live in the sensors deployed on the machines. The digital twin paradigm enables manufacturers to do two things: operate factories efficiently and gain timely insights into the performance of the products manufactured in these factories.

Read the full article at Smart Industry.

Researchers and defenders needed in IIoT

industrial refinery energy plant oil gas

The Internet of Things and IIoT are causing a lot of security headaches, mostly because these devices and the solutions used to secure them are still in the nascent stages of being developed and coming to market. Phil Neray, CyberX’s vice president of industrial cyber security, said even though the federal government has classified all of these as critical infrastructure, “The fact is that all of these devices were designed a long time ago.” With their age comes the issue that the protocols used to communicate were designed before anyone really understood the vulnerabilities in them. Neray said, “They lack many of the features we take for granted in cyber, and that leaves room for lots of zero days.”

Read more here.

 

That’s it for this week’s edition, don’t forget to check back next week for another News-In-Review. Also, our Twitter feed is filled with news on AM and IIoT so don’t forget to subscribe there as well!