Want disruptive? I’ll give you disruptive (Authentise Weekly News-In-Review – Week 18)

We are all starting to realize that AM is becoming the game changer it promised to be. This week there are mind-blowing examples of the technology being used to radically change the game economically and logistically all across the board. What do you think will be the impact on the manufacturing industry now that players realize that AM can bring shave costs in the millions of dollars like Boeing had on its Dreamliner production in collaboration with Norsk Titanium? Or when serialized production turnaround happens in days instead of months like Oracle managed to achieve with Carbon technology? On a wider note, AM will radically transform planning for operations where in-situ manufacturing is possible, making it much more economically viable to make use of local resources, especially in space activities.

3D Printing Titanium Parts Could Save Boeing Millions on Dreamliner Production

A 3D printed structural titanium component made with Norsk’s proprietary Rapid Plasma Deposition (RPD) process.

Boeing hired Norsk Titanium to print the first structural titanium parts for its 787 Dreamliner, a shift that the Norwegian 3D printing company said would eventually shave $2M to $3M off the cost of each plane. Strong, lightweight titanium alloy is 7 times more costly than aluminum, and accounts for about $17 million of the cost of a $265 million Dreamliner, industry sources say.
Boeing has been trying to reduce titanium costs on the 787, which requires more of the metal than other models because of its carbon-fiber fuselage and wings.

“This means $2M to $3M in savings for each Dreamliner, at least,” starting in 2018 when many more parts are being printed, Chip Yates, Norsk Titanium’s vice president of marketing, said in a telephone interview.

Read more about the collaboration here.

Carbon 3D print series of 10,000 parts for Oracle Labs servers

The 3D model (left) and a 3D printed branch (right) of the brackets stacked one on top of the other. Image & photo via Carbon

Oracle Labs, the R&D branch of multinational computer technology corporation Oracle, has used Carbon CLIP technology to 3D print a series of end-use brackets for use in its micro servers. 10,000 of the parts were needed to align circuit boards in the systems, and production was turned around within days instead of months. At first, Oracle planned on a component design reliant upon injection molding to hold the circuit boards. This method proved to be ineffective at producing such small parts within the required time frame, and the method didn’t support multiple design iterations.

“Instead of printing parts by inch CLIP let us print parts by hour. That’s game changing” – Craig Stephen, Senior Vice President Research & Development at Oracle Labs.

Read the full article at 3DPI.

Mining Materials for 3D Printing in Space

The first part 3D-printed from metal harvested from a meteorite. (Courtesy of Planetary Resources)

“Everything has a finite amount of resources. Everything has a cost and benefit”.

With limited resources, how can we populate multiple planets with only one livable environment? Fortunate for us, all of our resources originated in space. Planetary Resources made a point at the CES 2016 that mining asteroids was the future. It did this by using 3D printing and metal from a meteorite to produce a part. In addition, 3D printing may be the process of how things are built in space. Scientists have already 3D printed plastic objects in space, and they believe we can 3D-print metals. However, it might be simpler than this. If water freezes on the surface of the planets we are looking to build on, and there is hydrogen and water as a resource on these bodies, 3D printing ice in the shape of buildings might provide a robust housing. Sound nuts? NASA didn’t think so and awarded $25,000 to a team that designed a Mars Ice House for NASA’s 3D printed habitat challenge.

Read more about our space-faring possibilities at Machine Design.

 

Come back next week for another edition of News-In-Review and touch base at our Twitter feed where we share more AM and IIoT related news!

🏤 Learning from the Masters 🏭

Learning from the Masters

In the last few months we’ve had 200+ client calls, 5,000+ miles on the road and 10’s of thousands of miles in the air to meet you. This is what we’ve learned.

After the launch of our Manufacturing Execution System late last year we hit the road very hard to understand what clients think, what works well and what’s missing. Some of it we know, some if it was new. At a high level, there were few surprises but great reminders:

  1. AM companies are investing in IT infrastructure: Large & small corporations alike have developed sufficient use additive use cases to be certain that the technology will have a place in production for some time to come. As a consequence, managers are thinking about what that means for production workflows & the digital thread – a whole new world is opening up. That’s great news for us and our customers, especially as we witness an expansion of that thought process from just additive to production in general – Additive is a lighthouse for manufacturing in general when it comes to the Digital Thread.
  2. Production is 20% printing: In the forefront of the AM process is the AM machine – but going to visit sophisticated shops with significant material, testing and post-production tools, it’s becoming ever clearer that focusing on them exclusively is a fallacy.
  3. Needs vary: In the past we’ve thought about our clients in 3 buckets: External Service Providers, Internal Prototyping Operations, and Production Operations. You can see some of the differences and how we address them on our website. While we generally find that 90% of the tools are the same, there are still stark differences – especially if organisations specialise on metals or polymers.

What does that mean for our product?

We’re constantly adding and changing the MES suite and our 3Diax modules, so of course we’re going to incorporate these learnings. A few of the things that are coming up are:

  1. Process scheduler: Every product may follow a different path, or follow an existing production sequence. To help with this, we’re going to be allowing operators to design process templates by selecting production steps that define what needs to be done, when and what inputs machines or operators need to give.
  2. Integrating more devices: To make tracking that process easier, we’re integrating ever more machines to provide feedback directly into the MES. Adding feedback from CT, HIP, material testing devices and more helps us cover the entire process, not just production and leads – ultimately – to full digital traceability and automated QA.
  3. Planning variations: Right now, we’ve enabled clients to set up their build in our system. Given that different organzations have different ways of doing so, we’re enabling a second way – one that supports clients in using external systems to set up the print bed but use MES to track the production. Fortunately, MES works in the browser (though you can still install it locally – no need to use our cloud), so we have infinite flexibility in making sure the program works for you. You can see what a difference it makes below.

Most importantly, we learned the value of listening – we’re building a 21st century MES that doesn’t suck together with our clients so if you feel strongly about any of the learnings above, would like us to come and meet you in person, have other product ideas that you’re burning to make real or just want to learn more about us, please get in touch.

Schedule Demo here


Authentise on Tour

May is gearing up to be a busy month and we hope to see you on our travels: You can catch us in London, Knoxville, Louisville, Boston, Pittsburgh (Rapid!) and of course in San Francisco, LA and Salt Lake City. We’re super excited that Anusha, our brilliant computer vision engineer, is presenting at Rapid, where she will be joined by our CEO, Andre Wegner, who is helping to curate the Exponential Manufacturing conference in Boston. If you’re interested in discounts for the latter, let us know – it’s gearing up to be a fun show.

Tackling AM bottlenecks (Authentise Weekly News-In-Review – Week 17)

AM is bringing unprecedented capabilities to the industrial world but its technologies are still mostly experimental and much is being researched. Nonetheless, these bottlenecks are being addressed as we speak through sheer research and, on a higher level, by achieving the proper certification to make it into the real world. Researchers are putting under the spotlight every step of the AM process and have discovered a flaw which, if fixed, could dramatically speed up the whole process.  Crucial certifications’ specifics have been met by the team at Norsk Titanium in providing flight proof structural aircraft parts, the first to ever do so. Similarly, the complex system for complete AM industrialization is being finalized by Adidas to bring 3D printed shoes to mass-production.

 

New Research Could Help Speed Up the 3D Printing Process

A team of researchers from Binghamton University, State University of New York and MIT have identified some bottlenecks in 3D printers, that, if improved, could speed up the entire process. “We found that the rate at which a polymer melts is limiting in many implementations,” said Scott Schiffres, Binghamton Assistant Professor of Mechanical Engineering. “The pressure required to push the polymer through the nozzle is a sharp function of temperature. If the core is not hot enough, the printer will not be able to squeeze the polymer through the nozzle.”

Read the full article here.

 

Norsk Titanium 3D prints world’s first approved, structural, titanium components for commercial flight

The 3D printed and finished 787 Dreamliner component. Photo via Norsk Titanium

Norwegian aerospace additive manufacturing specialists Norsk Titanium AS has released details of a parts order from multinational aircraft corporation Boeing. According to Norsk, the ordered components will make the Boeing 787 Dreamliner the “first commercial airplane to fly with certified additive-manufactured titanium parts in structural applications.”

Read the full article at 3D Printing Industry.

 

How 3D Printing Will Optimize Your Next Pair of Running Shoes

custom shoes 3D printing

In the second half of 2017, Adidas is bringing [a new] level of customization to the U.S. with its Speedfactory, a production facility in the Atlanta area. Its goal is to deliver cutting-edge manufacturing and produce more shoes with “advanced complexity in color, materials, and sizes” for U.S.-based retailers and consumers. “The vision of Speedfactory is about making customized and personalized footwear for all people,” says Ben Herath, vice president of global design. “We’re bringing shoe manufacturing closer to the people and speeding up the manufacturing time.”

See the development story of 3D printed shoes here.

 

Don’t forget to follow us on Twitter to get more AM/IIoT related news and see you back next week for the next edition of News-In-Review!

Go Big or Go Home (Authentise Weekly News-In-Review – Week 16)

AM has matured into a fully fledged industrial manufacturing technology. As its materials, processes and applications broaden the jump to full-scale implementation is getting more and more a feasible possibility. The potential to disrupt various industries is being recognized by nations all over the globe: South Korea is one such nation at the forefront of innovation and it has decided to invest 41.2 billion won (Approx. $37 million USD) to foster the development of AM as a key innovation technology. Adidas, on the other hand, seems ready to tackle the stagnating idea that 3D printing is “all hype”. It announced that its concept shoe Futurecraft 4D is ready to be mass-produced as early as 2018, proof that the technology is more than capable to sustain its reputation as a manufacturing game-changer. This is surely shaping up to be the year of the “Go Big or Go Home” mantra, for AM and other important trends. For example in IIoT, where  Ubicquia wants to apply its concept on a city-scale.

South Korea to develop nation’s 3D printing industry with investment of over 41 billion won

Central district district of South Korea's capital city Seoul, viewed from Mt. Namsan. Photo by zuk0 on Flickr

The Ministry of Science, ICT and Future Planning in South Korea has announced it will be spending 41.2 billion won (Approx. $37 million USD) of 2017’s annual budget to encourage the development of 3D printing across the nation. Kang Seong-joo, an official from the ministry, says: “The 3D printing industry is the core technology that will bring about innovation in the manufacturing realm and create a new market by changing the paradigm of the industry. It is important for ministries to cooperate to actively deal with the fast-changing global trend.”

Read more here.

Adidas Futurecraft 4D starts a new era of 3D-printed shoes

Capture

Adidas is back with another sneaker based on a 3D-printed midsole, but this time the company says it’s moving even closer to mass production. The Futurecraft 4D shoe will be the first one using Carbon‘s “Digital Light Synthesis” process. The Silicon Valley company’s tech creates 3D items by blasting liquid with light, which Adidas says will allow it to operate on “a completely different manufacturing scale.” […] its plan to scale up projects more than 100,000 pairs made with the Digital Light Synthesis method by the end of 2018.

Read the full article at Engadget.

Revolutionizing the IIoT Industry One Streetlight at a Time

Sao Paulo industrial IoT Kairo Ubicquia

When Zimmerman [co-founder and chief technology officer of Ubicquia, an Industrial Internet of Things (IIoT) provider] recognized that a light pole could potentially solve all three of those challenges [power, networking and cost], the idea for Kairo began to take form. Over several months, Ubicquia designed and built a wide range of microcontroller boards featuring a variety of sensors and actuators that could be housed in a form factor no larger than a soda can. Kairo empowered sensor and application data to be harnessed by myriad of smart-city applications, delivering improved operations and planning, as well as better decision-making by city government.

Read all about Kairo at Spectrum.

 

Check out our Twitter feed to get more interesting news that weren’t featured here in our selection!

Evolving Scene of Metal AM (Authentise Weekly News-In-Review – Week 15)

This week was chock-full of news related to metal AM. The global scene is intensely researching the potential of metal AM and competitiveness is growing in all its aspects: metal powder production, CAD optimization, manufacturing method and much more. This week we saw exposed not one, but two new methods of metal AM! LLNL and the University of Sheffield both came out with novel techniques to produce produce metal objects additively and they both have their own unique benefits, being that increased speed or greater reliability. All the while we are making strides in understanding the complex physics involved in metal sintering processes: greater knowledge and improved optimization software is also crucial to manufacture metal parts reliably and efficiently.

 

Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory announces new metal 3D printing method

US federal research facility, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) has announced the results of an ongoing three-year research project into direct metal 3D printing. The technology, referred to as ‘Direct Metal Writing’ (DMW) adds to existing metal additive solutions such as selective laser melting (SLM). […] The new approach uses semi-solid metal feed material, beginning with a heated ingot or small block of metal. Once heated to a semi-solid state, the metal is then pushed through the extruder in a paste-like consistency. The material is shear thinning, which means it forms as a solid when left to rest and acts more like a viscous liquid when in motion or when applied with force.

Read more about DMW here.

Significant Speed Up For 3D Metal Printing Developed

Researchers at the University of Sheffield have developed a unique 3D metal printing process that could dramatically speed up metal printing. […] they call “Diode Area Melting”, or “DAM”. Instead of a single (or small number of) lasers, the DAM approach involves using an array of low power laser diode emitters. These emitters are not directed to the powder by an arrangement of mirrors, but instead are positioned above the powder surface and apply their energy directly.

Read more about DAM right here.

Challenges in modeling and simulation for metal additive manufacturing

Commercial acceptance of AM for exacting applications still faces a technical challenge caused by the limited understanding of physical phenomena in the melt pool. Real-time observation of this physical phenomena is difficult since AM melt pools are inherently transient and involve complex physical interactions between energy beam-powder substrate. Moreover, the real-time measurements of thermal and fluid variables can typically be made only on the surface of the melt pool. In contrast, a numerical simulation of mass, momentum, and energy transfer in melt pools can provide approximation of the melt pool shape and some useful 3D fields such as the distributions of temperature, flow velocities, solidification temperature gradient and solidification rate. Ultimately, an understanding of the relationships between processing, structure, properties and performance is essential.

Check out both parts of the article, here and here.

 

There is more where all these came from so don’t forget to follow us on Twitter for daily doses of AM news! And, as always, we hope to see you back next week!

Engineering Bespoke AM Materials (Authentise Weekly News-In-Review – Week 13)

This week we analyze how AM is broadening its own range of materials through innovative research and contributing to material research outside its own realm.

AM is greatly diversifying the choice of materials at its disposal, through material engineering or process improvements. New, super-stretchy polymers from SUTD promise a host of applications in flexible electronics and soft robots while a new microdroplets process from WSU allows for the manufacturing of structures with custom porosity and other properties. All the while, AM is the enabler of new bacteria processed, graphene-like materials.

As you can see, we’ve got a lot to cover!

New Elastomers Stretch 1100% for 3D Printing

Elastomers Stretch 1100% for 3D Printing

Researchers have developed a family of elastomers that they believe are the most elastic to date [up to 1100%] and can be fabricated using 3D-printing technologies, making these useful materials more accessible for a range of applications from soft robots to flexible electronics. “The new elastomers enable us to directly print complicated geometric structures and devices–such as a 3D soft robotic gripper–within an hour,” said Qi Ge, an assistant professor at the SUTD’s DManD Centre, and a co-leader of the project.

Read more here.

Nanostructure 3D printing mimics bio-materials

[…] researchers from Washington State University (WSU) have developed a method which can print metal structures with complex 3D architectures, controlling details down to the nanoscale and closely mimicking the architecture of natural bio-materials like wood and bone. This technique is likely to find other applications in batteries, supercapacitors and biological scaffolds.

Read more about it at Cosmos Magazine.

3D-printed bacteria could make bespoke graphene-like materials

Wonder material: graphene

How do you make a bespoke material with graphene-like properties? By putting bacteria to work using a 3D printer. Such bacteria could create brand new materials. For example, if you could use bacteria to print a substance resembling graphene – the 2D material made of single-atom layers of carbon – the end product might have similar desirable properties.

Read more at New Scientist.

 

We were at AMUG this week, holding a roundtable on AM process management challenges and solutions. We are grateful for the opportunity to share ideas with so many interesting people!

 

Don’t forget to follow us on Twitter and to come back next week for another weekly edition of the News-In-Review!

Security & Systematic issues in wake of IIoT (Authentise Weekly News-In-Review – Week 12)

Hello to our dear readers, welcome to the latest edition of News-In-Review!

IIoT is a term dense of meanings and implications. A lot of businesses see in its wake the possibility of unprecedented ROIs and some are already putting down the foundations to implement it in their proceedings. However, before obtaining the many benefits of data analytics, the proper system has to be put in place. One that needs to improve upon a pre-existing industrial network, fixing it’s outdated vulnerabilities, without the need for a complete overhaul. One that is able to withstand a growing risk of DDOS attacks from a growing number of sources thanks to the sensors riddled world we are constructing. And lastly, but not least, one that can assure quality processes and control of every step of the process chain.

If this is a topic you’re interested in, and want to dig in further, our CEO and CTO have written a chapter for Springer’s new “Cyberphysical Security for Industry 4.0” – due May 10.

Here’s this week news:

Forgotten factors that could take down IIoT

When it comes to IoT adoption in the industrial space, I’ve often found that operators worry about how they’re going to run before they can even walk. What this means is industrial operators let certain barriers to entry — primarily security and availability — keep them from even starting on their path to IIoT. In reality, there are certain key steps that industrial companies need to take well before they even attempt that transition.

Read more about these steps here.

Security Professionals Expect More Attacks On IIoT in 2017

Screen Shot 2017-03-18 at 12.28.16 AM

As technology vendors race to create more and more devices connected to the Internet of Things (IoT) the opportunity for hackers to get into these devices grows larger and larger, as these IoT devices are usually made with little to no regard for security. The fears of a large-scale attack waiting to happen were solidified this week when security firm Tripwire released the results of a study it performed about the rise of industrial IoT deployment in organizations, and to what extent it is expected to cause security problems in 2017.

Read the article and study at Onthewire.

Control is the key factor for implementing additive manufacturing in industry

According to the UK’s Manufacturing Technology Centre (MTC), control is the key factor for the implementation of additive manufacturing in an industrial setting. Speaking at today’s Additive World conference […] the MTC’s David Wimpenny explains the most important obstacles additive manufacturing needs to address. They created the National Centre for Additive Manufacturing two years ago, as a visualization of how they expect an additive manufacturing ‘factory of the future’ would look. However, Wimpenny is keen to stress it is not about the number of parts produced in the factory, but about control of the processes. Control of the quality and control of the data is the most important consideration for Wimpenny. As he says, “In a process chain, whatever you don’t control will be a problem”.

Read more here.

 

Don’t forget to follow us on Twitter and to come back in a week time to get a new glimpse at the future of AM, IIoT and all things in between!

Certifying AM for Industrial Excellence (Authentise Weekly News-In-Review – Week 11)

Hello to all our viewers, welcome to this week’s edition of News-In-Review!

Every week we are swarmed with varied news from the AM world which makes it hard to pinpoint a common theme or thread to talk about. Nevertheless, the world of 3D printing made giant leaps this week with regards to getting its righteous spot in the pantheon of certified industrial technologies. Lloyd’s Register has released an updated framework for metal AM parts certification to encourage the safe adoption of this technology in every industry. Siemens have provided an AM replacement part for a Slovenian nuclear power plant, passing the required quality certifications. And if further use cases were needed to prove the point, SSL has been using around 50-60 AM components in its satellites and we all know how stringent aerospace requirements can be.

Let’s dive in.

Lloyd’s Register, TWI release updated framework for 3D printed metal certification

Prof. Attallah steps on a 3D printed metal lattice Photo by www.edwardmoss.co.uk All rights reserved University of Birmingham Alumni

Headquartered in London, Lloyd’s Register (LR) has released an updated version of its metal additive manufacturing framework. Jointly published by research and technology organization TWI, the framework hopes to encourage “safe adoption” of metal 3D printing by promoting certification of parts. According to Lloyd’s Register, the new certification framework for AM metallic components “Provides a step-by-step approach to provide the necessary level of consistency, qualification and confidence to enable manufacturers an approach they can use alongside LR’s inspection and certification services”.

Read the full article here.

Siemens 3D prints part for nuclear power plant

The largest manufacturing and electronics company in Europe, Siemens announces it has 3D printed a replacement part for a nuclear power plant in Slovenia. The part was produced for the Krško nuclear power plant in Vrbina, Slovenia. According to Siemens, the power plant provides power for one-quarter of Slovenia and 15% of neighboring Croatia. This is a significant accomplishment not just for Siemens but for the 3D printing industry as a whole because implementing this part required undergoing stringent certification and qualification processes spanning several months. The news further validates 3D printing as an advanced manufacturing technique.

Read more here.

3D printing saving satellite builders time and money

Satellite manufacturers are turning increasingly to additive manufacturing to reduce the cost and time required to design and build spacecraft. SSL announced March 7 that its most complex additively manufactured part, an antenna tower with 37 printed titanium nodes and more than 80 graphite struts, is performing as intended. […] “We have satellites ready for launch that have 50 to 60 printed parts on them,” Mark Spiwak, Boeing Satellite Systems International president, said March 7 during a press briefing at the Satellite 2017 conference. “We are actively working with our suppliers on complex brackets and fittings that used to be machined parts. There is tremendous progress being made.”

Read the full article at Space News.

 

Don’t forget to check back next week and to follow us on Twitter to get all the news we don’t feature here!

Governments Driving AM (Authentise Weekly News-In-Review – Week 10)

Hi everyone, here we go for another weekly News-In-Review!

This week we highlight, through our selected news, how AM is bringing the wind of change to countries’ industrial planning and policies and how its inclusion has driven economic growth. Through wise policy making and good support investments, countries like South Africa and England and enabling the creation of business ecosystems, both startups and well-established realities. Germany is already harvesting the fruits of long standing AM companies, with innovation driven partnerships in the automotive industry and beyond.

Here’s to more international effort to get into AM!

Let’s dig in.

UK publishes Digital Strategy outlining plans for Makerspaces, IP protection for 3D printing, and internationally connected Tech Hubs

Westminster, including London's Houses of Parliament. Photo by Ged Carroll, on Flickr as renaissancechambara

The UK Department for Culture, Media & Sport has released a Digital Strategy for economic, educational and infrastructural growth of the nation. The policy follows a seven prong plan touching on the concepts of Makerspaces, FabLabs, 3D imaging, intellectual property for 3D printing, and growing international Tech Hubs. In February 2017, London Mayor Sadiq Khan also announced plans for a hub of industry in East London. As part of a total regeneration of the area, Silvertown is expected to feature the largest 3D printing facility in the UK.

Read more here.

South Africa in talks with Airbus, Boeing to print 3D parts

An Airbus A400M military aircraft. REUTERS/Fabrizio Bensch

Officially launched in 2011 and backed by government, the Aeroswift research project last year produced its first three demonstrator parts – a pilot’s throttle lever, a condition lever grip which is part of the throttle assembly, and a fuel tank pylon bracket, in a digital process known as 3D printing, or additive layer manufacturing. […] South Africa’s Council for Scientific and Industrial Research (CSIR), in partnership with local aerospace firm Aerosud Innovation Centre, say access to vast titanium reserves as well as pioneering the world’s largest titanium powder-based 3D printing machine should give them a competitive edge.

Read the full article here.

Five Stories Indicating Auto 3D Printing Is Kicking into High Gear

A 3D-printed water pump wheel for use in a DTM racecar. (Image courtesy of the BMW Group.)

Although there are numerous stories regarding the use of additive manufacturing (AM) in aerospace, due to the specialty components needed for critical applications, AM is also becoming increasingly prevalent for end part production in auto manufacturing. Below are just five of the big automotive AM stories that demonstrate its potential for auto manufacturing.

Read about the five stories at Engineering.com

 

AERODEF 2017:  We have a session titled ‘Additive Manufacturing from Lab to Production Scale‘ on Thursday 3/9 at 10 am, room 102 at Aerodef. Come see us, we’d love to meet you!

This is it for this week, don’t forget to follow us on Twitter and come back next week for the upcoming edition.

AM’s Symbiotic Relationship with Light Studies (Authentise Weekly News-In-Review – Week 09)

Hi everyone, and welcome to this week’s edition of Authentise News-In-Review!

This week we take a moment to marvel at the wonderfully symbiotic relationship between AM technologies and the study of light, or photonics. AM research is enabling scientists to work with entirely new materials with properties that are offering new ways to interact with nature and study our world. In exchange, our refined knowledge of photonics, empowered by this lengthened list of tools at our disposal, is fueling innovation within AM  technologies, pushing them to work faster, more reliably and accurately than before.

Here’s to light. Let’s dive in.

This Super-Fast 3-D Printer Is Powered by Holograms

Screen Shot 2017-02-25 at 1.54.38 AM

[…] The basic principle here is an established 3D printing technique that uses lasers to cure a light-activated monomer into solid plastic. But unlike other approaches, which scan a laser back and forth to create shapes one layer at a time, this system does it all at once using a 3D light field—in other words, a hologram. It could make 3D printing far faster. The advantage of Daqri’s [a startup that designs and builds augmented-reality devices out of laboratories in San Francisco and in Milton Keynes, U.K.] chip, the company says, is that it can create holograms without the need for complex optics. On a silicon wafer, a tiny grid of tunable crystals is used to control the magnitude and time delay, or phase, of reflected light shined at the surface of the chip from a laser. Software adjusts the crystals to create patterns of interference in the light, resulting in a three-dimensional light field.

Read the full article at Technology Review.

3D printed ceramic “butterfly wings” add color to photonic research

The iridescent wings of butterfly. Photo by Kathleen Dagostino, kathleencavalaro on Flickr

In a paper published in Nature Communications, physicists demonstrate the ability to reproduce the reflective structure of a butterfly wing through 3D printed gyroids. The discovery was made through the study of photonics – how light moves through space and objects – and has resulted in the patenting of a new material. […] Through a 3D printed gyroid, the researchers at Surrey and San Francisco demonstrate an ability to manipulate the photonic band gap through the shape of their ceramic object.

Read the full article here.

3D printing meets lasers in latest stem cell research

Stem cells can be used to build a brain tumour, which could help us beat it.

New research from Vilnius University in Lithuania combines laser writing and 3D printing to create more efficient micro-structures for the culture of stem cells. With computer aided design, biologists can specify structures that will allow cells to grow in a particular way, i.e. to form the pore-structure of the skin, or the cylindrical tissue of a vein. As to be expected, getting the right shape and form is a delicate process. The research from Vilnius University adds laser precision to such 3D microfabrication.

Read the full article here.

 

As a bonus article, here is our CEO Andre Wegner talking about the cloud, IIoT and the need for IT and OT to communicate.

Authentise CEO Bears Witness to OT, IT Folks Playing Nice in Cloud

 

Analytics is just the beginning of the IoT journey for manufacturers. There are already positive examples of machine control via the cloud. Authentise CEO Andre Wegner delivered that glimmer of hope tonight to more than a handful of people gathered around one of several topic tables at the Hard Rock Hotel in San Diego’s Gaslamp Quarter, the venue chosen to kick off Industry of Things World USA 2017. […] Authentise provides systems “to customers who are comfortable with a managed cloud, as well as those who are deciding to host it on premise,” he said. “We do what the customer wants, and are seeing about an even split in public cloud adoption. That’s probably more than most since industrial 3D printing is a new market and devices are most often already connected.”

Read the full article here.

 

This is it for this week’s edition, don’t forget to follow us on Twitter and to come back next week for another fill on the week’s juiciest AM news.