Beyond Bioprinting: The Way Ahead In Biological AM (Authentise Weekly News-In-Review – Week 30)

Welcome to our 30th News In Review for 2017!

We’ve all heard of the 3D printed heart and ear tissue. There is much more to bioprinting than these initial steps and, thanks to new technologies, explorations and endeavors, the road ahead is looking a whole lot more exciting. New technologies enable researchers with nanoscale control of the manufacturing environment, both low-powered and more precise, to create bioprinted scaffolds for a variety of uses. Synthetic biologist will surely make good use of the new tech: 3D printed bioreactors can be manufactured to generate specific kinds of biologic products, like proteins of even antibiotics. Bioprinting is skyrocketing, beyond the confines of our atmosphere. NASA has revealed plans to bring bioprinted cancer cells to the ISS in order to study potential treatments in a controlled, zero-g environment.

Light-directed assembly using gold nano-rods opens up 3D bioprinting applications

Using gold nano rods and near infrared laser for bioprinting

[…] the use of high-powered lasers to pattern micro/nanoscale objects has drawbacks. In particular, the substantial energy required to move material or objects means that high throughput of material is not possible. Now a team at the National University of Singapore have announced another technique to engineer living tissue. In the paper “Effective Light Directed Assembly of Building Blocks with Microscale Control” a method for improving control over the micro structure with light-directed assembly is described. The researchers believe their method could have applications for bioprinting, tissue engineering, and advanced manufacturing. Working with microfluidic-fabricated monodispersed biocompatible microparticles the scientists were able to fabricate a structure.

Check out the rest of the article here.

A better way to make drinks and drugs

Carefully selected molds churn out antibiotics. Specially engineered bacteria, living in high-tech bioreactors, pump out proteinaceous drugs such as insulin. Some brave souls even talk of taking on the petroleum industry by designing yeast or algae that will synthesize alternatives to aviation fuel and the like. Dr Nelson’s bioreactors are composed of a substance called a hydrogel, which is about 70% water. The remaining 30% is a special polymer, infused with yeast. [It can] be extruded smoothly through the nozzle of a 3D printer.The fun starts when such a [hydrogel] cube is plopped into a solution of glucose. The hydrogel is permeable to this solution, so the yeast is able to get to work on the glucose, converting it into ethanol as if it were the sugar in the wort of a brewery. […] The surprise was that it keeps on doing so, day after day, week after week, as long as the fermented solution is regularly replaced with fresh. The team’s bioreactors have continued to produce ethanol in this way for over four months now, with no signs of slowing down.

Read the full article on The Economist’s website.

NASA to take cancer fight into space with bioprinted cells

A BioCell which can contain six samples. Photo via BioServe.

NASA has revealed plans to grow bioprinted cancer cells in space in a bid to advance cancer research. Utilizing the microgravity environment, NASA hopes to the cell structures will grow in a more natural spherical shape. Since, back on earth in vitro the cells have only able been able to grow in two-dimensional layers. However to harness the cells without the presence of gravity, NASA is hoping to employ magnets.

Read more about NASA’s plans here.

 

This is it for this week, don’t forget to check out our Twitter, Facebook and Linkedin feeds for more news on the AM/IIoT world as well as updates to our services.

See you next week!

Week in Review: October 11th to 17th

Hello everyone, here we go for another week in review.

This week we take out the big guns as the US army believes that AM is most certainly at the core of it manufacturing future. Along these lines, future nuclear endeavors will need to exploit AM capability to maintain and update current and future facilities in order to keep facilities up to speed. AM is revolutionary per-se but new industry 4.0 standard practices and IIoT know-how can really drive businesses (even whole countries) to better manage resources and plan operations optimally.

 

Additive manufacturing ‘big part’ of Army future, AMC commander says

Army researchers are conducting case studies to optimize the processing parameters for different material depositions using its customized 3-D printer. Researchers like Ricardo Rodriguez hope to someday print large items like a Soldier's helmet with sensing capabilities embedded in hybrid materials, a potential solution they expect to optimize Soldier capabilities while reducing weight.

Take a walk through Best Buy or Microcenter, and you’ll likely find a 3D printer there making some sort of bauble out of extruded plastic. Army leaders say that kind of additive manufacturing technology has a role in the future of Army logistics and supply. “I’m a huge advocate,” said Gen. Gustave Perna, the new commander of Army Materiel Command. “I believe that our two greatest things that we can really make advancement on are robotics and additive manufacturing. I think there is great strength in additive manufacturing.”

Read more about it here.

 

Improving Nuclear Security with Additive Manufacturing

The Pantex Plant, a federal nuclear weapon facility in Amarillo, Texas, has successfully incorporated additive manufacturing into its tooling operations to revolutionize the way the site pursues its critical mission. In a work environment with little room for error, additive manufacturing has delivered a whole new level of precision and consistency that is helping to ensure the safety of workers, the community and the nation.

Read the full article at Machine Design.

 

Northern Germany is going 100% renewable with Industry 4.0 know-how

windpower

As part of the NEW 4.0 project, the states of Hamburg and Schleswig-Holstein have been merged into one consistent energy region to serve as a joint showcase for Germany and demonstrate that a clean-energy transition is feasible. NEW 4.0 aims to prove that a region with 4.5 million residents can be supplied with re-generative energy as early as 2035 by using 100% safe, affordable, and eco-friendly power sources that can lead to a reduction in CO2 emissions by 50 to 70%.

Read about the project and how industry 4.0 fits here.

 

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Authentise releases 3DIAX, a secure storage and application platform made for 3D files

Advancing its vision to build tools that empower 3D design and additive manufacturing businesses, Authentise today announced the launch of 3DIAX (www.3diax.com).

diax

3DIAX offers secure storage with access to dozens of tools developed by Authentise and leading third parties, including rendering, nesting, file fixing, model manipulation, search, toolpath generation and others, as well as full access to Authentise’s Design Streaming and Print Monitoring tools. For some applications it’s the first time they’re available in this format, and the list is constantly growing.

“Our security solutions are already used by leading 3D enabled businesses. Now we’re making it even easier for application developers and corporations to deliver 3D content to manufacturing and beyond by giving them access to all the tools they need in one place,” says Andre Wegner, CEO of Authentise. “We’re excited to be working with leading organizations such as Siemens as well as startups to bring their tools to a broad audience.”

3DIAX represents an exciting opportunity for application developers, who can use the platform to provide access to their solutions to a large audience in an integrated workflow. This allows 3DIAX users to make sure they’re always using best in class tools by lowering switching costs, simply and on a more affordable pay-per-use basis.

“We are very excited about 3DIAX and believe that integrating with the platform will help to create a comprehensive solution to solve several 3D Printing issues including ensuring the printability of 3D content utilizing our healing and repairing system”, says Mo Taslaq, CEO of Makeprintable.

Sunny Ripert, CTO of french 3D printable file sharing platform Cults, says that “Not only is Cults able to get going on releases faster because all the tools we need are under one roof. With Diax, we can also easily switch providers or integrate new services with just one line of code.”

Siemens Expands Frontier Partner Program for Manufacturing­focused Startups to Accelerate Innovations to Market

Founded in 1999 in Berkeley, California, Siemens TTB aims to nurture partnerships with startups to connect thousands of engineers, scientists and entrepreneurs to business opportunities around the globe. TTB is part of the Siemens Corporate Technology unit, which is comprised of some 7,400 of the world’s most talented innovators, scientists, engineers and technical experts from over two dozen countries.

“The Frontier Partner program joins a long line of Siemens Technology to Business programs that partner with startups to add value to our core and future businesses so we can better serve our customers,” said Chenyang Xu, General Manager, Siemens Technology to Business Berkeley. “The startups accepted into this program demonstrate excellence in developing unique and innovative technologies and partnering with Siemens can bring the scale and scope necessary to help their business succeed.”

The Frontier Partner program supports startups in the product development phase. Startups accepted into the pilot receive a year­long development license to a comprehensive suite of Siemens’ PLM software that enables them to develop the new product. Additionally, participants have access to Siemens development mentors and other technology partners who utilize Siemens software.

“Businesses across the globe in industries from autos to aerospace to consumer electronics are constantly striving to get products to market faster and more efficiently,” said Chuck Grindstaff, CEO and President, Siemens PLM Software. “Our PLM software solutions are being utilized today by virtually every segment of the industrial base worldwide, helping to enable the next era of advanced manufacturing. We’re proud to offer our tools to Frontier Partner startups as they work to bring their own manufacturing­focused innovations to market.”

Initial Frontier participants are:

  • Authentise –engineering software to securely stream 3D designs directly to printers.
  • Avante Technology, LLC –providing software that repairs & prepares 3D files for printing.
  • Matterfab –developing a metal 3D printer for industrial use. x MatterMachine –platform enabling scalable bespoke manufacturing.
  • nTopology, Inc. –building software to generate optimized 3D lattice structures.

“We’re delighted to be part of the Siemens Frontier Partner program to bring our secure delivery tools for additive manufacturing to a greater audience,” said Andre Wegner, Founder and CEO of Authentise. “This is just the start of a long partnership to learn and develop products for a distributed manufacturing future together.”

The pilot startups were chosen because they are all focused on solving industrial users’ challenges that are encountered with 3D printing including reliability, scalability, and ease­ of ­use for mass­ scale applications. Now, startups with a focused on robotics will also be able to access the Frontier Partner program.

The expansion of the Frontier Partner program was announced at Bold Bets: Tomorrow’s Industrial Entrepreneurship (And How Everything Will Change) – an event held by The Atlantic at the University of California, Berkeley that focused on the digitalization of infrastructure and how the infusion of entrepreneurship and data will impact industrial manufacturing and software. The event was underwritten by Siemens.

Bold Bets

Authentise mentioned in the Chicago Tribue

Tracy said manufacturing constraints — once a limit for the aircraft manufacturer — were fading in the face of new materials and the ability to design, analyze and certify parts made from new processes. The tendency of manufacturing to become an information business led Wegner to foresee a day when software — and not engineers — would design the shape of parts whose characteristics were keyed in as guidelines.

Hop on over to the Chicago Tribune to see more. Amazing event hosted by GE Ventures at the outskirts of IMTS in Chicago – honoured to be a part of it.