Formnext showed us how the AM industry is maturing (Authentise Weekly News-In-Review – Week 98)

The Authentise team has been exhibiting at Formnext in Frankfurt this past week. We had a blast exchanging views on the AM world and better understanding the industry as a whole. In the times between meetings and booth chats, we had the chance to roam the halls and take a peek at what’s on the horizon. What’s been consistently shown is a maturity and wide-ranging offering of products and services. The AM industry is cementing its stance, partly thanks to proven applications and no lack of R&D investment. As we saw it, Formnext was a chance for progress, not groundbreaking. This is not to say that there wasn’t innovation to be found within its halls, on the contrary. But the players are now pushing for market permeation more than ever.

EOS TO PREMIERE MILLION-LASER POLYMER 3D PRINTING AT FORMNEXT 2018

Powder exposure on the LaserProFusion. Photo via EOS
Leading 3D printer manufacturer and service provider EOS, is to debut a new polymer 3D printing technology at Formnext 2018 in Frankfurt next week. This technology, which is reportedly capable of replacing “injection molding in many contexts,” will be presented alongside a demo of Richard Browning’s 3D printed jetpack, and the company’s new quad laser EOS M 300-4 metal system as a production cell. The new developments from the company are made to increase 3D printer outputs to an industrially-competitive scale, a key theme throughout the industry as we saw at last year’s Formnext, and a chief preoccupation for EOS and its partners.

Read the full article here.

FIT AG presents ‘Spare Parts on Demand’ additive manufacturing solution at Formnext

SPOD FIT AG

FIT AG has presented its ‘Spare Parts on Demand’ (SPOD) solution at Formnext which employs additive manufacturing to produce industrial replacement components. As most parts that need replacing have been made with traditional methods, they have often passed through an approval process, meaning it isn’t possible to create a 3D printed copy. Deutsche Bahn, a German railway company, encountered this problem when attempting to replace the left sandbox housing in a brake system. The component had been manufactured in cast grey iron, and so the part had to be redesigned and then printed in titanium using EBM. The printed part has so far passed on all tests performed. At Formnext, FIT AG has showcased SPOD as a way for this success to be achieved with more regularity.

Read more here.

Nanoscribe awarded €40K prize, showcases microscale printing at Formnext
Tess Boissonneault

nanoscribe microscale

Nanoscribe, a specialist in microscale additive manufacturing, was recently selected as the first place winner of the Baden-Württemberg State Prize for Young Companies. The award, worth €40,000, is bestowed upon companies that demonstrate economic success and make a sustainable contribution to society in some way. This week, Nanoscribe has been showcasing its technology at Formnext in Frankfurt. There, the company is exhibiting the fabrication of structures with micrometer precision in millimeter dimensions for the first time.

Read the full article here.

 

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Why AM Certifications are so difficult (Authentise Weekly News-In-Review – Week 97)

For AM to take a greater hold on the industries it’s poised to impact, there are certain angles to smooth out and one of those is certifications. Early adopters of additive production such as aerospace and medical are rightly picky about its certifications and the AM community is making sure to have its own record straight. Safety certifications are the highest priority in this regard and Lockheed Martin’s facility in Sunnyvale, California now holds the first UL certified in the world. Govt. bodies are also moving to help a wider audience to stay within standards, like Health Canada’s newest draft guidance on AM medical devices. However, the main reason why certifications are difficult is that AM is still not an exact science. With fast and multi-spectrum monitoring technologies, we are starting to see what happens during the process. However, certain aspects of the physics behind it are full of variables we don’t understand.

Lockheed Martin extends additive manufacturing to key spacecraft components

Lockheed Martin’s Additive Design and Manufacturing Center in Sunnyvale, California, where the company produces military, commercial and civil space technology, attained a comprehensive safety certification.

“We are the first UL certified additive manufacturing facility in the world,” Servando Cuellar, Lockheed Martin Space Systems engineering senior manager, told SpaceNews.

Read more here.

Health Canada Drafts Policies on 3D-Printed Implantable Devices

Health Canada Drafts Policies on 3D-Printed Implantable Devices

 

 

 

 

Health Canada released draft guidance Thursday to aid manufacturers in preparing license applications for implantable medical devices produced by additive manufacturing or 3D-printing. The guidance “represents the first phase of 3D-printing policy in Canada” because Health Canada intends to continuously adapt its policies to emerging issues on the topic “due to the fast-changing technological environment,” the regulator said.

Read the full article here.

High-Speed Cameras Used to Monitor 3D Printing Process

3D printing, particularly laser-powder bed fusion or L-PBF, requires a great deal of monitoring to avoid defects and flaws in the final parts. In a thesis entitled “Process Monitoring for Temporal-Spatial Modeling of Laser Powder Bed Fusion,” a student named Animek Shaurya studies the use of high-speed video cameras for in-situ monitoring of the 3D printing process of nickel alloy 625 to detect meltpool, splatter, and over melting regions to improve the quality of the print.

Read more here.

We’ll be at Formnext in Frankfurt from the 13th to 16th November. Come see us at booth #B30J.

Follow us on Twitter to keep updated on AM & IIoT related news as well as updates to Authentise’s services!

How pioneer projects have laid the foundation for the true AM revolution (Authentise Weekly News-In-Review – Week 96)

In the beginning of the AM craze, everyone thought that the future of manufacturing was right around the corner. Once the storm had subsided and everyone was back to reality, most of the projects that had sparked at that moment were gone, but some endured. What was the difference between those which never made it past the news and those that are now solid industrial realities? For Nike, it was a matter of testing the market’s appetite and iterate on a product (and a production line) that worked. Its new line of 3D printed shoes is the heir of a project that’s year in the making and is eyeing mass production only after making sure that the path was true. Others saw in AM an opportunity to disrupt the established manufacturing infrastructure, and gradually implemented a new system, tried and tested to now enable to approach things differently. GE is one such case, one of the first to adopt AM and now it boasts one of the most extensive portfolios of applications in the field. However, sometimes a project needs the right fertile ground of established research to start growing. As NASA and Lockheed Martin constantly bring new aerospace parts to the testing grounds, proving the liability of AM in such a high-stake industry, new companies like Relativity Space hope to push the endeavor even further, by printing entire rockets. We are very grateful to those entrepreneurs who had the courage to jump into uncertainty, some to success some to failure, and make the world of AM what it is today.

Nike’s 3D Printed Elite Shoe Preparing For A Wider Release

The Zoom VaporFly Elite Flyprint 3D. Image via Nike
Nike’s 3D printed shoe Zoom VaporFly Elite Flyprint 3D will soon get a wider release. The Flyprint 3D is the updated version of the famous 3D printed Nike Zoom Vaporfly 4%, designed with the help of Eliud Kipchoge, winner Berlin marathon 2018. The Beaverton-based footwear giant has worked to perfect the Vaporfly 4% since last year. For this purpose, the company once again recruited the help of Kipchoge. The Zoom Vaporfly is called “4%” because an independent research found that Vaporfly wearing runners can gain 4% of the lead time on their competitors.

Read the full article here.

GE Transportation To Introduce 250 3D Printed Locomotive Parts By 2025

According to reports in UK rail industry authority the Railway Gazette GE is looking to apply additive manufacturing to components for its locomotives. If all goes according to plan, this could mean that in the next seven years GE Transportation will have an inventory of up to 250 3D printed train components. A pilot initiative for 3D printing at GE Transport is underway as part of its Brilliant Factory model, combined with analytics and lean manufacturing in a Digital Thread.

Read more here.

Relativity Space’s Quest To 3D Print Entire Rockets

Even NASA has been dipping their proverbial toe in the additive manufacturing waters, testing printed parts for the Space Launch System’s RS-25 engine. It would be safe to say that from this point forward, most of our exploits off of the planet’s surface will involve additive manufacturing in some capacity. But one of the latest players to enter the commercial spaceflight industry, Relativity Space, thinks we can take the concept even farther. Not content to just 3D print rocket components, founders Tim Ellis and Jordan Noone believe the entire rocket can be printed. Minus electrical components and a few parts which operate in extremely high stress environments such as inside the pump turbines, Relativity Space claims up to 95% of their rocket could eventually be produced with additive manufacturing.

Read the full article here.

 

We’ll be at Formnext in Frankfurt from the 13th to 16th November. Come see us at booth #B30J.

Follow us on Twitter to keep updated on AM & IIoT related news as well as updates to Authentise’s services!

How being open helps you and the AM community (Authentise Weekly News-In-Review – Week 95)

For some people, “Open” has plainly negative connectations. What open really means is for everyone to weave and participate in an environment that enables learning, interoperability and ultimately makes very much business sense – as we saw in Red Hat’s $33bn acquisition. The maker revolution started as a way to put 3D printing and other technologies in the hands of everyone, democratizing manufacturing and bring about a new wave of STEM pupils. FDM printers were the first but now all sorts of printing platforms are going open. In fact, being open enables businesses to embrace third party opportunities more readily and easily and ultimately brings greater value to the customer. We recently announced the support for the quoting capabilities of Prosper3D within our own platform, something that our customers can keep in mind when creating the best platform for their case. We need to share more of the cool work we do, otherwise most will never see the light of day. We have just closed a crowd-sourcing experiment with Fabbaloo inviting anyone to submit their best 3D printing application, and the most voted got featured in our playing cards deck! The community has so much to give.

The Oasis 3DP Brings Open Source Binder Jetting to Makers

The 2018 Hackaday Prize will soon be wrapping up, and as always, the contest has yielded some wonderfully innovative and promising ideas. One entry, submitted by Yvo de Haas, aims to make binder jetting accessible to everyone. Binder jetting, in which a liquid binding agent is deposited to bind powder particles together, is an effective method of 3D printing whose benefits include not requiring supports. It’s not a technology, however, that is typically accessible to the average maker.

Read more about it here.

A New Milestone for Open Additive Manufacturing Platforms

Authentise Logo

Authentise, the leader in data-driven workflow tools for additive manufacturing, today announced a new partnership with Prosper3D, the provider of accurate quoting solutions for AM service bureaus, to give Authentise customers an even greater choice in tools to manage their workflow. As part of the agreement, Authentise customers will be able to access the Prosper3D quoting engines seamlessly through the Authentise Additive Accelerator interface.

Read the full press release here.

Highlighting The Best 3D Printing Applications

 [Image: BlueWLabs]

Karen Linder shared with us this wonderful application of 3D printed designs that work in combination with engineered material properties. By restoring natural oyster habitats the environment will benefit from biological filtration systems, wave barriers and natural nurseries for fish and other marine life. Presently, 85% of the world’s oyster reefs are functionally extinct. The material employed is plastic-free and is optimized for better larval settlement, survival and growth. Karen’s entry has been voted as the best application on the round and will be included as a new card in the latest update to our playing cards deck.

Read more about it here.

 

We’ll be at Formnext in Frankfurt from the 13th to 16th November. Come see us at booth #B30J.

Follow us on Twitter to keep updated on AM & IIoT related news as well as updates to Authentise’s services!

Monitoring 3D prints – more than just a business boost (Authentise Weekly News-In-Review – Week 94)

We at Authentise are champions of the idea that 3D printing data must be exploited anywhere it is to be found. This often times comes from the printers themselves, offering KPIs on successful print rates and more. Yet even more information can come from external monitoring systems, which that can provide you with data from within the process itself. The benefits of running a monitoring system are numerous, from helping you identify, and potentially correct, issues from within the process, to giving an unprecedented look at still little-known physical phenomenons. Metal printing, for example, is still grounds of research, as we try to understand the dynamics of precise powder melting and the behavior of very hot particles. Another example would be to track 3D printed objects, based on the unique printing “signature” of each printer (like vibrational micro-defects), and thus being able to tell which printer produced it.

High-Speed Cameras Used to Monitor 3D Printing Process

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In a thesis entitled “Process Monitoring for Temporal-Spatial Modeling of Laser Powder Bed Fusion,” a student named Animek Shaurya studies the use of high-speed video cameras for in-situ monitoring of the 3D printing process of nickel alloy 625 to detect meltpool, splatter, and over melting regions to improve the quality of the print.

Read more at 3DPrint.com

New NIST method measures 3D polymer processing precisely

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Researchers at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) have demonstrated a novel light-based atomic force microscopy (AFM) technique–sample-coupled-resonance photorheology (SCRPR)–that measures how and where a material’s properties change in real time at the smallest scales during the curing process. […] Surprising the researchers, interest in the NIST technique has extended well beyond the initial 3D printing applications. Companies in the coatings, optics and additive manufacturing fields have reached out, and some are pursuing formal collaborations, NIST researchers say.

Read the rest here.

This is how researchers can now track 3D printed guns, weapons

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According to academics from the University of Buffalo, there is a way to use the ‘fingerprint’ of 3D printers to accurately trace items printed through the machinery, which may include counterfeit goods, guns, and other weaponry.  No in-fill patterns are the same, and this is the key to tracking down a specific printer.

“3D printers are built to be the same. But there are slight variations in their hardware created during the manufacturing process that leads to unique, inevitable and unchangeable patterns in every object they print,” says Wenyao Xu, Ph.D., associate professor of computer science and engineering in UB’s School of Engineering and Applied Sciences and lead author of the study.

Read the full article here.

 

Senvol Developing Machine Learning for US Navy for Additive Manufacturing

Screen Shot 2018-10-22 at 12.15.26 AM

Senvol has publicly announced that it is developing data-driven machine learning AM software for the U.S. Navy’s Office of Naval Research (ONR). Senvol’s software analyzes the relationships between AM process parameters and material performance. ONR’s goal is to use Senvol’s software to assist in developing statistically substantiated material properties in hopes of reducing conventional material characterization and testing that is needed to develop design allowables.

Read more here.

 

We’ll be at Formnext in Frankfurt from the 13th to 16th November. Come see us at booth #B30J.

Follow us on Twitter to keep updated on AM & IIoT related news as well as updates to Authentise’s services!

The Confluence of AI and AM (Authentise Weekly News-In-Review – Week 92)

We’ve witnessed how the digital age is transforming the manufacturing industry and nowhere it is more apparent than in the contributions that AI is giving to the field. Advanced computing capabilities are being coupled with full-spectrum sensors and autonomous “thinking”. These systems are being developed in AM for a variety of benefits. First, they can help with in-process fault detection, constantly monitoring the printer for defects where the human eye can’t see and even adjust it to fix the problem on the spot. Bringing a trustworthy AI system in the fray opens up possibilities for decentralized manufacturing, where human skill isn’t needed to produce good quality, reliable parts. Such manufacturing units can be located anywhere, operate autonomously and even cooperate with one another to reach a certain goal. Authentise is presently using AI technologies to drive process estimates, providing an accurate, reliable window into your operations.

 

US Navy and Lockheed Martin Are Building AI-Driven 3D Printing Robots

Lockheed Martin

A new generation of smart 3D printers is under development which will use artificial intelligence to oversee and optimize 3D printed parts. The US Navy’s Office of Naval Research (ONR), which is funding the ambitious project, has recently announced a two-year $5.8 million contract. There are four partners working on this project, led by Lockheed Martin’s Advanced Technology Centre. The collective aim is to be able to create robots that can make independent decisions on how to optimize the production of complicated 3D printed parts.

Read the rest here.

 

Mobile Robots Cooperate to 3D Print Large Structures

A team of robot arms on mobile bases can 3D print large structures quickly

Roboticists at Nanyang Technological University in Singapore have, for the first time (as far as they know), performed “the actual printing of a single-piece concrete structure by two mobile robots operating concurrently.” The big advantage of this system is that you can use it to build structures that are more or less arbitrary in size without having to change the system all that much, since the robots themselves can define their own build volume by moving around.

Read more at IEEE Spectrum.

 

Kansas State University Researchers Develop AI System For 3D Printing Process Monitoring

Researchers from Kansas State University’s Department of Industrial and Manufacturing Systems Engineering (IMSE) have developed a new quality monitoring system for the 3D printing process. With integrated supervised machine learning, a camera, and image processing software, the researchers created a production quality monitoring system for assessing 3D printed parts in real-time.

Read the full article here.

 

We’ll be at Formnext in Frankfurt from the 13th to 16th November. Come see us at booth #B30J.

Follow us on Twitter to keep updated on AM & IIoT related news as well as updates to Authentise’s services!

Key Reasons AM is Headed to Manufacturing: Price, Tools & Pilots (Authentise Weekly News-In-Review – Week 91)

AM has moved from a technology limited to prototyping to a full-fledged game changer in manufacturing. This change didn’t happen overnight and we can trace its recent success on a few key advances that enabled it to become more approachable and employable. First, metal AM machines are coming down in price drastically, making the technology more affordable to businesses at a sub $500K price tag. Hybrid manufacturing equipment is incorporating AM to leverage its potential while compensating its shortcoming with traditional tools to finish the job, making the jump into AM less restrictive. Ultimately, but not less important, companies are finally coming out of their pilot projects with positive results and are keen to delve deeper into their investments and scale their operations.

HP’s Metal Jet 3D printer may build your next car’s innards

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A number of companies offer metal 3D printing, which creates products and components layer by layer with a computer-controlled system tracing its lineage to ordinary inkjet printers. But on Monday, printing giant HP announced it’s entered the market with the ambition to dramatically lower prices, courtesy of a $400,000 product called the Metal Jet.

“We’re really going to enable mass production for mainstream metals, in particular steels,” said Tim Weber, head of 3D metal printing for HP.

Read more at CNET.

Hybrid Manufacturing & The Future of 3D Printing for Production

[…] much like 3D printing, the potential benefits of hybrid manufacturing have made some early adopters very optimistic about the technology’s future prospects. Michael Sealy, assistant professor of mechanical and materials engineering at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln is one of them.

“Additive really opens up the doors in terms of being able to print your own mechanical properties layer-by-layer or zone-by-zone,” he said. “That’s one of the big advantages, so I see hybrid AM exploding in the next few years just because of all that potential.”

Read more here.

GE Transportation To Introduce 250 3D Printed Locomotive Parts By 2025DoSo6x6XkAAgjqC

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

According to reports in UK rail industry authority the Railway Gazette GE is looking to apply additive manufacturing to components for its locomotives. If all goes according to plan, this could mean that in the next seven years GE Transportation will have an inventory of up to 250 3D printed train components.

A pilot initiative for 3D printing at GE Transport is underway as part of its Brilliant Factory model, combined with analytics and lean manufacturing in a Digital Thread.

 

We’ll be at Formnext in Frankfurt from the 13th to 16th November. Come see us at booth #B30J.

Follow us on Twitter to keep updated on AM & IIoT related news as well as updates to Authentise’s services!

IMTS: the present and future of manufacturing (Authentise Weekly News-In-Review – Week 89)

IMTS is now behind us! So much excitement that it’s hard to roundup. Our presence at the America Makes booth gave us an enhanced perspective of what the new manufacturing customer is looking for and the various exhibitors delivered a barrage of announcements and products. From the amazingly large INGERSOLL 140′ wide extrusion 3D printer to HP’s new Metal Jet productivity beast. IIoT was represented strongly as a means to automate operations, as was robotics and so much more.  Tough time choosing so below is also a video of a cool robot 😉

What was your favourite part of IMTS?

HP Metal Jet launches at IMTS 2018

Multinational information technology company HP has released HP Metal Jet 3D printing technology. Working on the same basis as its Multi Jet Fusion (MJF) binder jetting 3D printers, the new system marks HP’s first foray into the metal additive manufacturing sector.

Dion Weisler, CEO and President of HP Inc., comments, “We are in the midst of a digital industrial revolution that is transforming the $12 trillion manufacturing industry,”

Read more about it here.

Ingersoll showcases 3D printed winglet layup tool at IMTS

large 3D printer

Ingersoll Machine Tools Inc. showcased at this week’s International Manufacturing Technology Show (IMTS) Master Print, the company’s new large-format 3D printing technology with automatic attachment change to 5-axis CNC for aerospace-grade milling. The technology was developed in collaboration with Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). The part, says Ingersoll, weighs 430 lb/195kg and was printed in 6.5 hours. It was machined in 4.3 hours using the machine’s 5-axis technology. The material is ABS with 20% chopped carbon fiber reinforcement.

Check out the full article at CompositesWorld.

FANUC Display

 

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Finding the new limits of AM (Authentise Weekly News-In-Review – Week 88)

If you think that AM is sitting comfortably into its allotted seat, that it has already found its target market, you’d be wrong. AM’s flexibility enables us to find numerous potential fields to disrupt. This flexibility is made possible by its assortment of technologies, hardware, software and everything in between, that change the rules year by year. Advances in robotics and AI enable groups of autonomous, mobile units to step up the construction process. After the 3D printed pills and surgical models and implants, we are now beginning to use AM in the development of new future-proof antibiotics. Strong of its success of sending the first 3D printer to the ISS, Made in Space is aiming to produce higher quality fiber optics in space, creating a new business case for manufacturing in and outside Earth’s orbit.

Mobile Robots Cooperate to 3D Print Large Structures

A team of robot arms on mobile bases can 3D print large structures quickly

Roboticists at Nanyang Technological University in Singapore have, for the first time (as far as they know), performed “the actual printing of a single-piece concrete structure by two mobile robots operating concurrently.” The big advantage of this system is that you can use it to build structures that are more or less arbitrary in size without having to change the system all that much, since the robots themselves can define their own build volume by moving around.

Read more at IEEE Spectrum.

HP Partners With CDC To Test And Bioprint Antibiotics

The HP D300e Digital Dispenser BioPrinter. Photo via HP.

HP has announced its participation in the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) pilot program that aims to develop new antibiotics designed to fight antimicrobial-resistant bacteria. With HP’s bioprinting technology, microbiologists are able to print antibiotics samples for testing directed at halting the spread of such bacteria.

Read the full article here.

Optical fibre made in orbit should be better than the terrestrial sort

Made in Space and FOMS (Fiber Optic Manufacturing in Space) are both proposing to manufacture optical fibre of the highest quality in the free-falling conditions of the International Space Station. At $1m a kilogram, this is a material that is well worth the trip to and from orbit.

Read more on The Economist.

Follow us on Twitter to keep updated on AM & IIoT related news as well as updates to Authentise’s services!

AUTHENTISE will be exhibiting, through a partnership with America Makes, the power of smart digital tools within the AM production thread. Showcasing our 3Diax modular platform and MES for AM, you’ll be able to witness how our machine learning algorithms and automation tools can boost operational performance through the roof for each role within the pipeline.

WHERE: additive ETC, located on Level 3 of the West Building at McCormick Center.

Data/Advanced technologies lay groundwork for new economic models (Authentise Weekly News-In-Review – Week 87)

The current trade wars between the US, Europe and China are proving to be a thorn in everyone’s side, and people are looking for solutions. This may not come from a change in political climates (sadly), however the technological trends we have been observing in the past few decades point towards an exciting possible outcome. The economy as we have it structured today may not hold up to new manufacturing technologies that enable decentralized, as-needed production. 3D printing is making it redundant to have warehouse stock and to deal with the infinitely complex hassle of global logistics. Plus, every step of the pipeline is being digitized, made flexible and agile, empowered by data and capable of so much more than if constrained in its traditional box. As Apple has proven, data is the new oil and is the foundation of present and future enterprises. Are current laws up to these elevated standards? Do we need to revise our concept of economy in light of these affirmed and evolving technologies?

 

How 3D printing could help save us from trade wars

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While tariffs and trade wars from the White House may threaten our jobs, peace and prosperity, technology innovations from American business could save us. Just as new technology in energy production and extraction have reduced our dependence on the Middle East, a technology innovation of a very different sort — 3D printing — is already poised to reduce our dependence on Asian factories.

Read the rest here.

 

3D Printing Industry Experts Comment On Impact Of Trade Wars Tariffs On Additive Manufacturing


Today marks the start of US trade tariffs on goods valued at $34 billion worth of imports from China. A list published by the Office of the United States Trade Representative (USTR) details the 818 tariff lines that will be subject to an additional 25% in duty. China has responded with additional import taxes on US goods valued at a similar amount. 3D Printing Industry contacted resellers, manufacturers and other 3D printing insiders around the world for their thoughts about how the “the biggest trade war in economic history” will impact additive manufacturing.

Read the interviews on 3D Printing Industry.

 

Apple Is The New Exxon And Data Is The New Oil: The Path To The First $10 Trillion Company

There is no longer any doubt that the 21st century will be propelled by companies producing and using data, just as the 20th century was propelled by companies producing and using oil. The analogies are numerous and accurate and all emanate from the core reality: the century-long era of petroleum and the rise of automobiles and aviation is now followed one of data and the rise of computers and robots.

Read the rest on Forbes.

 

Follow us on Twitter to keep updated on AM & IIoT related news as well as updates to Authentise’s services!

AUTHENTISE will be exhibiting, through a partnership with America Makes, the power of smart digital tools within the AM production thread. Showcasing our 3Diax modular platform and MES for AM, you’ll be able to witness how our machine learning algorithms and automation tools can boost operational performance through the roof for each role within the pipeline.

WHERE: additive ETC, located on Level 3 of the West Building at McCormick Center.