What’s our automated future going to look like? (Authentise Weekly News-In-Review – #113)

Automation is being touted as both a miracle of efficiencies and savings and a scourge on manual workers and users’ safety. There isn’t one definitive way to look at the trend other than to accept the fact that it’s coming. Should we be afraid of it? No. As we mentioned, automation is already bringing incredible tools to factories and production pipelines across the world. Coupling capable robots with intelligent sensors’ networks is a sure recipe for a future of abundance (quoting Peter Diamandis). Think your one-day delivery (or 2h if in NY and other few cities) is a stunning achievement? It’s hard to envision a world where robots of all shapes and sizes automate the shipping process to a degree where we might equate the accessibility of products to the streaming of Netflix movies, but that’s already in the works. It’s coming, however we’re not quite there yet. Automated cars might look sophisticated in Google’s or Waymio’s marketing runs, but it’s a very complicated system of variables. 3D printing is helping make these self-driving cabs sturdier than ever, but a release is still off in the distance. Another common fear is that technologies like these will take away jobs from a good portion of the population. However, we must take into account that technology is inventing entirely new jobs along the way of making old ones obsolete. Automation is about making your life easier and more pleasurable. We recently announced the release of our mobile app designed towards digitizing the tracking of post-processing steps in AM. With the time saved from manually reporting on production stages, operators can act on more engaging activities.

Free Shipping

Amazon has imagined a system that sends a robot out from each house to meet a delivery truck. Industry predictions suggest that robots could eventually be able to grasp and move objects within a household — one potential example, a towel-folding robot, has already been exhibited as a prototype. By the time that delivery robots begin arriving at your home, your residence might already be operating as an automated warehouse in its own right.

Read the full story here.

Local Motors Wants To Prove 3D-Printed Self-Driving Shuttles Are Self

Screen Shot 2019-03-17 at 9.25.17 PM

Local Motors has been working on 3D-printed vehicles for around five years. We were first introduced to the company when it showed off a working 3D-printed car at the 2015 Detroit Auto Show. Since then, the company has tested over 2,000 combinations of printing material and fortifying additives, and it can print an entire Olli in roughly 10 hours (down from 44 hours in 2014). Now, Rogers says, the tech has matured to the point that it’s time for the company to start showing off the progress it’s made.

Read the rest here.

Former Google Exec: AI Will Replace 40% Of Jobs In 15 Years

AI, whether it’s an application of machine learning or some new technology altogether, is poised to shatter the global economy.

Kai-Fu Lee, a venture capitalist who used to develop artificial intelligence for both Microsoft and Google, told CBS’ 60 Minutes that AI will displace 40% of the world’s workers within 15 years.

“I believe [AI] is going to change the world more than anything in the history of mankind,” Lee told CBS. “More than electricity.”

Read the full article here.

 

 

We are going to exhibit at AMUG! Come visit us at booth #37 from March 31st – April 4th.

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Additive-made tooling. The future? (Authentise Weekly News-In-Review – #112)

Is 3D printing making traditional tooling obsolete? Yes and no. There are certain applications where the former is hands down beating the competition: things we are accustomed to hearing, better quality and performance and a faster turnout. Last week, we already featured a great example highlighting that drilling bits can be 3D printed. There are also new features that are making the shift even more appealing. A greater range of materials gives much more freedom to the engineers when dealing with tougher leagues, guaranteeing more longevity and reliability. However, as of today, the choice between 3D printing and, say, casting needs to be pondered on a per case basis. 3D printing is still more expensive when considering a production run of multiple pieces. The two technologies can be used together to confront this and provide the upsides of both. For example, 3D printing sand casts for injection molding (coupled with computer simulations) has been proved to improve the performance of the process, decreasing warping and thus increasing production reliability. At the end of the day, the idea still applies that 3D printing is to be considered a tool in the box among others, although this tool sure is shoving its way to the front row.

Lightweight CoroMill® 390 produced with additive manufacturing

Long overhang milling can be a vibration-prone application. The lightweight CoroMill® 390 cutter, in combination with Silent Tools™ adaptors, is developed to overcome this challenge. When designing lightweight CoroMill® 390, material has been tactically removed to create the optimal cutter design for minimizing mass. This makes it more compact and significantly lighter than a conventional cutter.

Tooling Manufacturer Brown & Holmes Expands Material Options With 3D Printing

Fixtures produced on the Stratasys 3D printers. Photo via SYS Systems.

Tamworth-based tooling manufacturer Brown & Holmes has added two Stratasys 3D printers to its operations. The 3D printers were acquired to expand the material choices Brown & Holmes offers to its various customers, and to replace parts used in its production solutions and fixtures.

Mick Waller, Brown & Holmes Engineering Manager, said “Our customer base is looking at us now for newer and different materials beyond the conventional. There are over 17 materials we can print between the two Stratasys machines, which has meant that we can adopt the newer carbon fibre-type material to replace metal parts in our production solutions.”

Read more about it here.

3D Printing Studied as a Way to Produce Tooling for Injection Molding

In a thesis entitled “Tooling for Injection Molding Using Laser-Powder Bed Fusion,” a University of Louisville student named Mohith Ram Buxani takes a closer look at using 3D printing to create tooling for injection molding. The injection molding industry has always suffered from high costs and long lead times for tool making. 3D printing is an alternative method of creating tooling, saving time and money.

Read more about the research here.

 

We are going to exhibit at AMUG! Come visit us at booth #37 from March 31st – April 4th.

Follow us on Twitter to keep updated on AM & IIoT related news as well as updates to Authentise’s services!

The short, and long term planning for AM’s future (Authentise Weekly News-In-Review – #111)

3D printing is a technological trend and as with all trends, one should at least try to plan on its future development. So while we’re excited about every new applications, such as the rapid advances the industry is making to make the old traditional tooling industry much more efficient, we’re also excited about the medium term. That includes projects such as houses being 3D printed with biodegradable materials in record times – maybe not immediately relevant but clearly disruptive. Long term though, opportunities are even more disruptive. Our recently approved patent may be a while away from making us money, but importance and disruptive nature of distributed manufacturing is so significant that it’s worth investing every USD to make sure that people collaborate to make it happen. It is a stepping stone for a future infrastructure for production scale AM, one that’s made of building blocks yet to come. We are proud to give our work for the betterment of the industry as a whole, and excited to bring this vision to fruition along with other teams equally as hungry for innovation.

3D printed tool cuts through titanium, wins innovation prize

PhD candidate Jimmy Toton from RMIT University in Melbourne, Australia, has won the 2019 Young Defence Innovator Award and $15,000 prize at the Avalon International Airshow for the research, which was conducted with Defence Materials Technology Centre (DMTC) and industry partner Sutton Tools.

“Now that we’ve shown what’s possible, the full potential of 3D printing can start being applied to this industry, where it could improve productivity and tool life while reducing cost,” Toton said.

Read the full article here.

 

3D-printed Gaia house is made from biodegradable materials

Gaia is a 3D-printed house by WASP made from biodegradable materials

Italian 3D-printing technology developer WASP, built the house to showcase the abilities of Crane Wasp, a modular 3D-printer that can create homes in a variety of formats and sizes. Called Gaia, the 30-square-metre house has a 3D-printed outer shell and internal timber beams holding a timber roof. It was printed on site in Massa Lombardo, a town in the Italian region of Emilia-Romagna, in October 2018.

Read the full article at Dezeen.

 

The Real Value Of 3D Printing Patents

[Image: Pexels]

Because patents are a business reality, filing one is a business decision. So when Authentise this week announced the approval of a new patent — for its “System, Method and Program Product for Digital Production Management” — the initial assumption was easy: they’ve decided to protect their IP. That’s not the whole case, though. Andre Wegner, Authentise’s Founder and CEO, confesses that as a rule he doesn’t “care much for patents.” So why file one?

It is ultimately a strategic move, yes, but not one that Authentise really plans for itself. Rather, it’s a move to prove a much larger business case for digital manufacturing.

“In other words,” Wegner explains in a thoughtful LinkedIn piece, “we see this patent as a shining ad to the industry as to where the technology is moving. To get there, we have to work together with others. To work with others, we have to show them there’s value in it. That we think there’s enough value to file a patent.”

Read the full article at Fabbaloo.

 

We are going to exhibit at AMUG! Come visit us at booth #37 from March 31st – April 4th.

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The problems, and solutions, to the IIoT (Authentise Weekly News-In-Review – #110)

The Industrial Internet of Things (IIoT) is taking hold on many industrial settings, and yet we are still far from reaping its true benefits. There are multiple reasons for this, and they have to do with the technical limitations of dealing with a large number of sensors and data, how to interpret it correctly and efficiently and how to create a reliable mesh network to tie it all together. AI may look promising for data handling and predictive systems. However, there are many angles to iron out before these make feasible solutions. AI’s prowess on self-teaching may fall short when, to be useful, it would have to learn and predict countless possibilities of a complex industrial setting. Established technologies, or novel combinations of them, can bring exciting opportunities to the table. RFID tagging for warehouse traceability is a dream come true for spoiling inventories while merging long-range connectivity with cloud services can satisfy a large portion of IIoT applications.

How IIoT and RFID deal with perishable inventory

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In North America alone, billions of dollars of food spoil before reaching customers each year. In the pharmaceutical industry, temperature-sensitive products are regularly damaged due to inappropriate shipping and storing conditions. To gain better visibility into the location and the condition of perishable inventory items, businesses can turn to RFID and IIoT technologies.

Read the full article at Smart Industry.

Is Artificial Intelligence the Answer for IIoT?

Many AI methods are self-taught, so they avoid the need for process mapping and other tedious analytical processes, making it seem to be the right fit for IIoT. Yet, only a few methods will apply. The most useful methods are not greedy for impossible amounts of data. They focus machine learning in explainable ways. The rest will fail badly.

Read more here.

Using LoRa and Google Cloud for IIoT Applications

Image of a gateway communicating with the cloud on LoRa

Pairing LoRa connectivity with the Google Cloud Platform (GCP) can serve a wide range of industrial IoT (IIoT) use cases. The longevity and resilience of LoRa paired with GCP’s robust architecture and commitment to scalable innovation provides industrial operators with the tools they need to build the world of tomorrow.

Read more here.

 

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Sideways innovation: unexpected avenues of discovery (Authentise Weekly News-In-Review – #109)

Innovation isn’t always a straightforward process. Sometimes to even begin to diagnose the problems we need a new perspective on the system as a whole, and that might mean researching curious tangents. Take flying taxis as an example: in our quest to one day see them whizzing over us, we never considered the systemic bottleneck of the manufacturing of high-tech materials like carbon fibers. Insights like this happen when we look beyond sheer innovation, thinking holistically of the topic at hand and not being blindsided by the shiny new technological grail. IIoT may one day benefit greatly from the blockchain, but is it ready for prime time in cybersecurity applications? Should we look at more traditional and effective approaches while we crack the infrastructure that will make it viable? Let’s look beyond the initial goal, let’s find interesting tangents to our research. Old materials can be reinvented with 3D printing, one of the many technologies that give us the tools to question everything.

Blockchain May Be Overkill For Most IIoT Security

Blockchain crops up in many of the pitches for security software aimed at the industrial IoT. However, IIoT project owners, chipmakers and OEMs should stick with security options that address the low-level, device- and data-centered security of the IIoT itself, rather than the effort to promote blockchain as a security option as well as an audit tool.

Read the full article at Semiengineering.

The Need For Carbon Fiber Could Ground The Flying-Car Future

Icon’s struggle to ramp up production of an airplane it initially promised for $139,000 can be blamed mostly on its heavy use of carbon fiber—a material that cuts weight and adds strength, but also adds complexity and cost to the manufacturing process.

Read more here.

Dichroic 3D-printing material changes color with point of view

A miniature goblet printed from the new material appears both opaque brown and translucent violet

In use since at least the 4th century AD, dichroic glass displays different colors depending on how it’s being viewed. Now, Dutch scientists have produced the effect in a material that can be used to create 3D-printed objects – and it’s not just a novelty, as it could have practical applications.

Read the full article here.

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Self-healing and other smart properties of the products of tomorrow (Authentise Weekly News-In-Review – #108)

Material sciences is one of the greatest contributors for the awe-inspiring new papers that are being released in recent times. Not only are we discovering fundamental new properties of established materials, but new meta-materials are also shining a new light on the possibilities ahead. Coatings that are capable of self-repair after scratches or cracks, textiles that change the knitting density based on humidity and more. 3D printing is also playing an interesting part here because it is both player and beneficiary of these discoveries: in some applications, the materials are born out of 3D printing’s ability to combine different materials in one new compound, in others these materials solve some of the technology’s major hurdles, like overhand printing or structural performance.

 

Fluid-inspired material self-heals before your eyes

Engineers have developed a new coating strategy for metal that self-heals within seconds when scratched, scraped or cracked. The novel material could prevent these tiny defects from turning into localized corrosion, which can cause major structures to fail.

Read more about it here.

 

Using 3D Printing, Researchers Combine Graphene Oxide, Seaweed- Derived Material to Create Smart Hydrogel

Researchers from Brown University are utilizing graphene oxide to strengthen alginate—a natural material derived from seaweed—and create a unique hydrogel that will become stiffer and softer in response to different chemical treatments. This innovation could be used in several applications, including to make more robust smart materials that react to their surroundings in real time.

Read the full article here.

 

Smart fabric changes thermal properties based on environment

The new fabric being developed by University of Maryland scientists. Credit: Faye Levine, University of Maryland.

For the first time, scientists have devised a fabric that can dynamically alter its thermal properties in response to the environment. The automatic thermal regulation means people would no longer have to take off clothes when it’s hot or put clothes on when it’s too cold. The breakthrough lies in cleverly engineering the fabric with two different types of synthetic yarn — one absorbs water, while the other repels it.

Read more on ZME Science.

 

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Bringing sports to higher standards through 3D printing (Authentise Weekly News-In-Review – #107)

Coming up on the Super Bowl, we are reminded that sports are a love affair with peak performance and health risks. 3D printing is a key player when it comes to looking after the athletes’ wellbeing while at the same time providing them the edge over their adversaries. Just looking at the NFL, head-trauma is a very serious problem, and Riddell is developing football helmets that are custom-fitted from scans of the athletes’ heads to improve its safety features. At the same time, 3D printing is already giving the upper hand for teams to win big. Chinese speed skating athletes won the gold at the last winter Olympics partly thanks to the new and improved glove tips, that are lighter, stronger and provide less friction, plus are custom made for the person wearing them. Innovation isn’t coming just to the frontline of sports, as companies like Nike and Adidas are pushing 3D printing to production standards, democratizing the new levels of performance that the technology enables.

 

Why NFL players are wearing this new custom 3D-printed helmet

helmet

Ahead of the Super Bowl, the NFL is testing out the first helmet to be made with 3D printing. Each Riddell helmet is custom-made for a player based on a scan of his head. Former players like Peyton Manning are excited about the comfortable custom fit and potential to make football safer.

Link to the video here.

 

3D Printing Helped Chinese Team Win Gold at 2018 Winter Olympics

The Chinese team, [at the 2018 Winter Olympics] had special gloves with 3D printed metal fingertips, courtesy of Chinese 3D printing company Farsoon Technologies. Glove tips are normally made of resin or gel, but the metal tips provided a number of advantages. These included less friction between the athletes’ fingers and the ice. Made from titanium alloy (Ti6Al4V), the tips were buffed and polished so that they had a smoother surface and produced less drag than traditional glove tips. They were also designed to be comfortable and lightweight – they had 40% less weight and higher structural strength, while the wall thickness was reduced by 75%.

Read the full article here.

 

How Adidas Plans To Bring 3D Printing To The Masses

Adidas is not only planning to introduce by the end of this year 100,000 pairs of shoes with plastic midsoles made via a new 3D technology created by Silicon Valley startup Carbon; it’s also making moves to ramp up that production to millions in the coming years, said James Carnes, vice president of strategy creation for Adidas’s namesake brand.

“We have a really aggressive plan to scale this,” Carnes said in an interview. “We are scaling a production. The plan will put us as the (world’s) biggest producer of 3D-printed products.”

Read the full article here.

 

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What is the future of AM going to look like? (Authentise Weekly News-In-Review – #106)

With AM, as with any other exponential technologies, it’s very hard to make a sound prediction on its future development, even in the next 5 years. However, there are clear indications that certain roadblocks will most likely be surpassed. Industrial settings will see reliable and large-scale AM technologies being pushed to the high standards required to being widely adopted. New materials with exciting properties will enable new, unthought of applications and provide sustainable new ways to drive AM production forward. All the while, new engines with record number of AM parts will keep being produced and new crucial precedents will be set for future developments to build upon.

HUST Researchers Iron Out Cracks Of 3D Printed Bulk Metallic Glass

SEM imaging of micro-cracks that form inside a BMG when 3D printed by SLM. Image via Materials & Design

A team of researchers led by Professor Ning Li at the Huazhong University of Science and Technology (HUST), China, have discovered a way to scale-up 3D printing of bulk metallic glass (BMG). With a unique atomic structure, BMG alloys are highly resistant to wear and corrosion while maintaining the melted malleability of glass. However, micro-cracks that occur during 3D printing present a severe disadvantage to BMG utility. At HUST, Professor Li, Jianji Zhang, Wei Xing, Di Ouyang and Lin Liu have developed composite iron and iron-nickle BMG alloys that suppress these deal-breaking micro-cracks, with findings that provide general guidelines for processing BMGs via selective laser melting (SLM).

Read more about the study here.

Empa Cellulose 3D Printing Advances Yield Guidelines For Composite Material Tuning

Illustrations of the direct ink writing 3D printing process (left) and in situ polarization rheology (right) used in the Empa study. Image via ACS Nano

A group at the Swiss Federal Laboratories for Materials Science and Technology, Empa, is investigating ways to 3D print cellulose. As the most abundant organic polymer in the world, the material is sustainable, and biocompatible, presenting great potential for medical research. Recent progress made at Empa demonstrates how to 3D print cellulose nanocrystals (CNCs) as a material reinforcement. Experimentation also shows how to tune the orientations of these CNC “building blocks” to achieve different properties in a finished object.

Read the full article here.

Sunconomy To Develop 3D Printed Concrete Homes in Texas


Sunconomy, a U.S. construction company, has received permits to build its first 3D printed geopolymer additively manufactured house in Lago Vista, Texas.

Larry Haines, the founder of Sunconomy, stated, “We will be able to build the structure for a single family house in a day with virtually no waste, and built super strong and providing very low utility costs. Now that’s Sustainable!”

Read more here.

 

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Additive in Aviation is Growing Even Faster! (Authentise Weekly News-In-Review – #105)

Many would say that with the GE Fuel Nozzle, the 1000 additive parts in the Airbus 350 and now the GE ATP engine, additive has already arrived in aviation. But this week we witnessed an event greater acceleration: At Hill Air Force Base, engineers are already validating and installing replacement parts for their $150 million F-22 aircrafts, printed to the highest standards and with greatly enhanced lead times and life-cycles. If you couple the capabilities of 3D printing with predictive maintenance and an intelligent IIoT network of manufacturing and storing, there’s opportunity to redefine the whole model. Airbases are already disposing 3D printers for in-situ manufacturing and new partnerships are bringing more and more industrial capabilities to the runways. At Authentise, we’re proud to apply the principles of predictive maintenance to our customers’ printers themselves, bringing an added tier of intelligent planning, along with a pervasive MES framework that can bring this dream to the real world.

Learn more about the modules that make us unique at https://authentise.com/modules.html

 

Metallic 3D Printing May Revolutionize Maintenance for F-22 Raptor

 An airman removes the intake covers of an F-22 Raptor before a training mission. The first metallic 3D-printed part was installed on an operational F-22 in December at Hill AFB, Utah. (US Air Force photo/Michael Holzworth)

The world’s most expensive fighter jet soon may be flying with parts made from a 3D printer. Maintainers at Hill Air Force Base, Utah, last month installed for the first time a metallic 3D-printed bracket on an operational F-22 Raptor, according to the Air Force and Lockheed Martin, the company that produces the $150 million aircraft.

“Once we get to the more complicated parts, the result could be a 60 to 70 day reduction in flow time for aircraft to be here for maintenance,” Robert Lewin, 574th Aircraft Maintenance director at Hill.

Read the full article here.

 

3D Printing Brings Maintenance Efficiency And Improved Healthcare To Travis Air Force Base

Joshua Orr, 60th Aircraft Maintenance Squadron, uses a 3D scanner to scan an aircraft part. Photo via U.S. Air Force/Heide Couch

Travis Air Force Base (AFB) in Fairfield, California has recruited the help of 3D printing technologies. The Air Base has employed 3D scanners to reduce maintenance time. Having 3D printers on the base will ensure rapid replacement of aircraft parts.

“Once we have this additive manufacturing capability in place, we will likely be able to print and replace parts in a few hours and return our aircraft to flying status much quicker,” Master Sgt. Christopher Smithling, assistant section chief for aircraft structural maintenance, 60th Maintenance Squadron.

Read the rest here.

 

EOS and Etihad Airways expand 3D printing capabilities

Etihad Airways Engineering claims to be the largest aircraft maintenance repair and overhaul services provider in the Middle East.

Industrial 3D printing company EOS and Etihad Airways Engineering, the largest aircraft maintenance, repair and overhaul services provider in the Middle East, have agreed a strategic partnership which will significantly expand local capabilities for industrial 3D printing in aviation. Following a structured selection process, suitable cabin interior parts will be produced through the AM process, which offers a substantial value-add in terms of optimised repair, lightweight design, shorter lead times and customisation options, particularly during aircraft modifications.

Read the full article here.

 

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Where are our 3D printed homes? Progress within the building industry (Authentise Weekly News-In-Review – #104)

It seems that after the initial outpour of hype for the construction building to adopt 3D printing in pretty much every application, the buzz has died down. We got so excited by the MX3D bridge in Amsterdam and the impressive print times of the homes by WinSun or ApisCor. Where’s our building industry boom? In truth, much of this sector still needs much R&D to be of widespread use: material sciences for printable and reliable cement, building design for printability, construction-grounds automation, even simple order-of-operations. But progress is happening that makes us hopeful. For one, the industry is seeing new players enter the fray, with a Long Island startup boasting to print a house in just 30h. Internationally, we see more projects coming to a close, with China inaugurating a new 3D printed bridge. Permits are being granted and laws are being brought up to speed for new buildings to finally start rolling out, which might make the dream closer than one might think.

Can this startup 3D-print a home in 30 hours?

A group of friends on the south shore of Long Island, New York, working under the name S-Squared, think they can revolutionize the way that homes are built, using a self-made 3D printing rig that they claim can lay down a home in a little more than 30 hours. The promised sale price—under $200,000, due to the reduction in manpower and labor costs—would be a game-changer for an expensive market such as Long Island. It would also be a new entry into the wide field of firms seeking to perfect and commercialize the process of mass-producing homes using 3D printing.

“This will be the first time a real house is going to be built with 3D printing,” says Bob Smith, an S-Squared co-founder. “Everyone else has put up sheds.”

Read the full story at Curbed.

China’s first 3D-printed footbridge opens in Shanghai

bridge

The span, which opened for business on Friday, was created by Shanghai Machinery Construction Group using materials made by Polymaker, the state-run China News Service reported. On its website, the Shanghai government described the new bridge as an “innovative way to promote 3D printing technology and popularise it in urban construction”.

“It’s both an everyday, practical application and an interactive one that involves people touching and even relying upon … a 3D printed thing,” Polymaker said on its website.

Keep reading here.

Sunconomy To Develop 3D Printed Concrete Homes


Sunconomy, a U.S. construction company, has received permits to build its first 3D printed geopolymer additively manufactured house in Lago Vista, Texas. These homes will include three bedrooms, and two bathrooms with a detached garage, solar, wind, battery backup, and a rainwater catchment system, at an estimated cost of $289,000.

Larry Haines, the founder of Sunconomy, stated, “We will be able to build the structure for a single family house in a day with virtually no waste, and built super strong and providing very low utility costs. Now that’s Sustainable!”

Read more here.

 

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