3D printing is enabling a new kind of space entrepreneurship (Authentise Weekly News-In-Review – #130)

3D printing is proving to be a transformational tool for the fresh players of the new space race. Iteration cycles for the aerospace industry are notoriously long: 3D printing enables the development of aerospace parts to be cut from months to just a few weeks. This is a boost for newcomers, shortening time to launch and enabling faster competitiveness in the global race. The rapid pace of technological change is forcing everyone to quickly adapt to new trends. These new companies are also the most pliable to changes to the supply chain, which will be stressed to accommodate new needs and technologies. It’s hard to predict future business opportunities, but new avenues of exploration are being researched through 3D printing. In-situ resource utilization is of great interest for any habitat, tool or even medical need future astronauts might have.

How additive manufacturing helped launch SpaceX

How additive manufacturing helped launch SpaceX

SpaceX has been using AM increasingly in its production to optimise processes and produce parts that aren’t possible with conventional manufacturing methods. SpaceX has been continuously evaluating the benefits of 3D printing and perfecting the techniques required to develop and manufacture flight hardware. With innovation and efficiency at the core of SpaceX, it’s no wonder its been one of the first companies in the sector to embrace AM as a major part of its production.

Read the full article at PES Media.

Supply chain expands to meet demand for 3D-printed space parts

It’s not clear whether the additive manufacturing supply chain will expand rapidly enough to meet growing demand for 3D-printed parts for spacecraft or launch vehicles. When companies are starting out, it’s easy for them to turn to additive manufacturing service providers for a few parts, said Scott Killian, aerospace business development manager for EOS North America.

“Once companies move into production, they’re going to have to figure out whether the supply chain can still meet their needs,” he added. “There’s a lot of ebb and flow right now on getting that supply chain to ramp up.”

Read more at Space News.

Scientists 3D-print human skin and bone for Mars astronauts

The European Space Agency’s 3D Printing of Living Tissue for Space Exploration project aims to print human tissue to help injured astronauts heal when they’re far, far away from Earth. Scientists from the University Hospital of Dresden Technical University in Germany bio-printed skin and bone samples upside down to help determine if the method could be used in a low-gravity environment. It worked. ESA released videos of the printing in action.

Read more at CNET.

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The Stock is Stuck in the Past: tech is changing the warehouse (Authentise Weekly News-In-Review – #129)

The entire supply chain is being redefined by transformative technologies, turning on their heads old notions of manufacturing and shipping. Change is coming from multiple angles, all aimed towards a single, common goal: making the warehouse obsolete. The main reason is to address a greater need for production agility, being locked down by large inventories of items that are expensive to maintain and risk getting surpassed before even being used. The future is geared towards high customization and rapid delivery. By inching additive manufacturing closer to being a production technology, items can be produced on-demand and in-situ, jumping over a large chunk of a logistical nightmare. Speaking of which, IIoT networks are making it easier than ever to analyze the data necessary to maintain a high operational awareness, enabling pro-active planning instead of reactive.

The Rise of the On-Demand Warehouse

In China the expectations are even more demanding [than Amazon’s] — JD.com (a huge Chinese online retailer) makes 90% of its deliveries within 24 hours, with 57% arriving within 12 hours. Experiences like this are delightful for the customer and fascinating for the investor. What allows such a supercharged supply chain to exist? What hurdles have to be overcome? And, more importantly, what are potential future opportunities and what would it take to get there?

Read the full article at Medium.

3D Printing Is Finally Ready For Its Close-Up

Selective laser melting, direct metal laser sintering, 3d printing, industry 4.0

Zero inventory” has been mostly unobtainable for manufacturers. But cutting-edge 3D printing technology is giving managers renewed hope. Carbon announced Tuesday it raised $260 million in growth funding. This San Francisco company is developing a platform executives claim will bring 3D printing to high-volume production. This would mean the end of inventories, and the beginning of new business models.

Keep reading at Forbes.

Why logistics scenarios matter for the future of the industrial IoT

A tanker at sea.

We will see faster speeds throughout the chain, which will become more efficient, convenient and sustainable by orders of magnitude. That’s because 5G will power the Industrial Internet of Things (IIoT), enabling large-scale, real-time connectivity all the time. What if all of these devices could interact with one another without human intervention? What would this type of constant connectivity look like at scale, in complex logistics operations, for example?

Read the full article at World Economic Forum.

 

 

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Production AM needs Post-Processing that is up to par (Authentise Weekly News-In-Review – #128)

As we gear towards a more diffused and wide-ranging production AM ecosystem, maintaining a post-processing workflow that is up to it will be equally important. Most 3D printed parts aren’t usable without a post-processing step, be that supports removal, polishing or thermal tempering. We’ve gotten quite good at it, and creative, designing machinery that is simple yet performant, to aid in the quest for a tight-knit AM pipeline. Software plays an equally important role. Authentise has recently announced our app to enable AM operators to digitize post-processing steps, enriching their workflow with data from the entire process.

Postprocessing gains importance as the number of parts in 3D-printed production runs increases

“There’s a real shift in the industry right now,” said Ed Graham, vice president of additive manufacturing at ProtoCAM. “Where it might be cost-effective using human labor to finish a prototype or even a couple dozen parts, we’re now seeing orders for 1,000 pieces or more. That’s why more efficient postprocessing methods are increasingly important now, because of all the emphasis recently on end-use materials, faster print times, larger build envelopes, and, ultimately, higher production volumes.”

Read the full article on The Fabricator.

Is Plasma The Missing Link In Assembling 3D Printed Parts?

Motorbike fairing glued together using piezobrush PZ2. Image via Relyon Plasma.

The [Relyon Plasma’s] piezobrush PZ2 uses plasma to activate surface particles of a substance which strengthens the adhesion between joined parts. With a strong bond between assembled 3D printed parts, it is possible to manufacture large-sized sturdy components on small sized 3D printers. According to the CEO of Creabis, Ralf Deuke, plasma-aided bonding will lead to more novel applications in 3D printing.

Read more about it at 3DPrint.com

Post-Processing Enabling Additive Manufacturing

Post processing, in one form or another, is an inevitability when using additive manufacturing (AM) technologies, but is particularly critical for serial production applications of AM — both in terms of the financial costs and the time it takes between a part leaving the AM system and being fit for purpose as an end-use product. In this article, Joseph Crabtree, the CEO at Additive Manufacturing Technologies Ltd, considers the importance of post-processing in the entire production process chain and highlights an emerging solution.

Read more here.

 

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How Data is supercharging everything around us (Authentise Weekly News-In-Review – #127)

We are strong advocates of the power of data and the opportunities extend well beyond the industrial setting. Everything around us is being uplifted through the aggregation and analysis of data to get insights that would otherwise pass unnoticed or be difficult to grasp. And that is the key: making the data understandable and actionable. IIoT networks submerge businesses’ data centers with information and, to make it work to their advantage, new technologies like AR and VR are stepping in to make it all human-readable. Similarly, transposing medical scans into tangible, bleeding replicas for the doctors to practice on is all about bringing the data closer to the end user. In our eagerness to digitize everything we find ourselves often surprised by data we have gathered that, in hindsight, we never knew we needed. Reparations for the tragic fire at Notre Dame in Paris will be aided by 3D scans of the cathedral that were done in 2015.

Augmented reality: the new business tool driving industry 4.0

Augmented reality: the new business tool driving industry 4.0 image

How can organisations deploy augmented reality (AR) at scale, solve meaningful business problems with the technology and embrace industry 4.0, as a result, Four end-user organizations discussed these questions and their own AR journeys during a panel at LiveWorx 19. Howden […] emerged in the peak of the first industrial revolution but is now committed to embrace the fourth industrial revolution, or industry 4.0. It has done this, in one way, by looking to AR.

“AR has provided us with transformation and consistency,” said Maria Wilson PhD, global leader data driven advantage at Howden.

Read the full article at Information Age.

Prepping For Surgery With 3D-Printed Organs May Become Commonplace

Many doctors are using 3D-printed replicas of human organs to practice for complex surgeries like transplants. Technology is still expensive, but Knowable Magazine reports that as 3D printing gets cheaper, rehearsing a surgery on a 3D-printed replica of a specific patient’s organ could become the norm rather than the exception — a bizarre example of how emerging technology could make personalized medicine cheaper and safer for more patients.

Read more at Futurism.

Fortunately, There Are Incredible 3D Scans of Notre Dame

Thanks to the meticulous work of Vassar art historian Andrew Tallon, every exquisite detail and mysterious clue to [Notre Dame’s] construction was recorded in a digital archive in 2015 using laser imaging. These records have revolutionized our understanding of how the spectacular building was built — and could provide a template for how Paris could rebuild.

According to Wired, “architects now hope that Tallon’s scans may provide a map for keeping on track whatever rebuilding will have to take place.”

Keep reading here.

 

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Fostering electronics development through 3D printing (Authentise Weekly News-In-Review – #126)

The field of electronics has been particularly prone to evolution in the past, with the shrinking of the circuitry and increasing of computational powers. However, it’s always been an inherently multi-step production process which reduces the opportunities for exploration into new shapes, material, and properties. 3D printing is beginning to apply its features to electronics as part of the multi-material printing push. This not only enables innovators to experiment much more freely with their PCBs, but iterations can also happen much more frequently. For testing purposes, this is the perfect combination. New satellites are being developed (and sent to the ISS) as well as new eco-friendly electronics that dissolve into the environment. For many companies, this is the means to a faster product development cycle for items that had to be ordered from China, shipped, tested and ordered anew with a few tweaks. The ability to print electronics in the lab is a very powerful tool.

International Space Station Will Test 3D-Printed Materials In Orbit

Nano Dimension's 3D printing process in action.

New 3D-printed materials are going to space thanks to a recently funded partnership between Israel’s NanoDimension and Florida’s Harris Corp. The companies plan to create new materials to reduce the manufacturing of small satellites, an exceedingly popular market right now for applications ranging from weather observations to remote surveillance.

Read the rest at Forbes.

Collaboration sparks sustainable electronics manufacturing breakthrough

IMAGE

Simon Fraser University and Swiss researchers are developing an eco-friendly, 3D printable solution for producing wireless Internet-of-Things (IoT) sensors that can be used and disposed of without contaminating the environment. SFU professor Woo Soo Kim is leading the research team’s discovery involving the use of a wood-derived cellulose material to replace the plastics and polymeric materials currently used in electronics.

Read the full article at EurekAlert.

NanoDimensions and Hensoldt Partner to Develop 3D Printed Sensor Technologies

The 3D printed radio frequency (RF) circuit board. Photo via Nano Dimension.

Israeli 3D printed electronics manufacturer NanoDimension has partnered with Hensoldt, a German-headquartered sensor technology specialist. The two companies will use the DragonFly electronics 3D printer to develop applications for Hensoldt’s security and defense division. Thomas Stocker, Hensoldt’s Head of Engineering, said,

“Our focus is on providing our customers with the highest quality cutting-edge innovations […] By using the DragonFly, we’ve already accelerated our application development.”

Read the full article at 3D Printing Industry.

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Where does 3D Printers’ innovation go from here? (Authentise Weekly News-In-Review – #125)

Modern 3D printers have come a long way since patents started expiring. Yet, we can rest assured that the end of innovation is not in sight. Many stones still left to turn. Authentise is on the frontline of software that enables production-scale AM. Implementing a more sophisticated brain within 3D printers, capable of acting on the print in different ways, is a very exciting thought and something that Inkbit and others are finally bringing to market. On the hardware side, 3D printers themselves can be improved upon, also by the same design processes that AM is bringing elsewhere. Fewer parts, easier assembly, more efficient, these are all benefits that could lower the machines’ cost and improve usability. Discovering new pathways to innovation is a group effort and it’s always fantastic news when partnerships are born to bring together material sciences, production tech, and software to promising new horizons.

MIT: Inkbit Creates 3D Printers with Eyes, Brains & Vast Capabilities

Inkbit is ready to disrupt in a radical way, with a plan to create volumes of new products via their new multimaterial inkjet 3D printer imbued with a vision system that scans each layer being fabricated and corrects any errors. Not only that, these ‘eyes’ are forward thinking and can actually foresee potential issues with warping—allowing the user to fix any problems and go on to print successfully.

Read more about it on 3DPrint.com

HP’s new 3D printer has 3D-printed parts

hp-vibrator-pa12.jpg

[HP] has unveiled its HP Jet Fusion 5200 Series 3D printer, which it said will deliver high-quality parts at industrial levels of efficiency and accuracy. Some of the components of the printer are themselves 3D-printed, such as the part below, which uses vibration to fluidise powder: 3D printing allowed it to be redesigned to reduce the assembly from 30 parts to just 6.

Read the full article at ZDNet.

The Power Of Partnership In 3D Printing: Impossible Objects And BASF

Impossible Objects' new CBAM-2 3D printer.

Disruptive digital-industrial technologies break down traditional barriers; new partnerships and collaborations are the fastest way to exploit their full potential. The partnership between 3D Printing startup Impossible Objects and chemical giant BASF, announced last month at the RAPID + TCT additive manufacturing conference, is a case in point. […] The combination of Impossible Objects’ new technology and BASF’s new PA6 allows a broader range of production possibilities, especially in the automotive and industrial sectors, with higher speed and throughput, at more affordable prices—an important step to help 3D printing achieve greater scale.

Read the rest at Forbes.

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Unlocking AM’s potential through materials (Authentise Weekly News-In-Review – #124)

Material sciences are among the most prolific fields of studies within AM, and for good reason. When the technologies for 3D printing begin to crystallize among a selected few, innovative applications mainly spring up from exciting new materials, offering new possibilities. By 3D printing diamonds, for instance, a new shelf of ultra-durable tools can be designed from a terribly hard to shape material. Heightened knowledge of materials’ physical and mechanical properties is giving rise to interesting multi-material applications, enabling complex, functional products to be printed in one go with some surprising features to boot. Still, there is a lot of ground to cover. While we may know the fundamentals of how to print with some materials, we’re still far from a comprehensive understanding of said processes, so researchers will have their hands full for quite some time.

We can now 3D-print diamond material — but not for jewelry

Screen Shot 2019-06-02 at 1.48.17 AM

Sandvik, a Swedish company specializing in mining, materials science and metalworking, has developed a way to make diamond composite materials with the 3D-printing technology called additive manufacturing. The material can be formed into many custom shapes, but think of ultradurable drills, not exotic earrings.

Read the full article at CNET.

Collaboration sparks sustainable electronics manufacturing breakthrough

IMAGE

Simon Fraser University and Swiss researchers are developing an eco-friendly, 3D printable solution for producing wireless Internet-of-Things (IoT) sensors that can be used and disposed of without contaminating the environment. SFU professor Woo Soo Kim is leading the research team’s discovery involving the use of a wood-derived cellulose material to replace the plastics and polymeric materials currently used in electronics. Additionally, 3D printing can give flexibility to add or embed functions onto 3D shapes or textiles, creating greater functionality.

Read the rest at Eurekalert.

3D Printed Magnets – Is It Possible to 3D Print Them?

3D printed magnets are attracting attention throughout industry.

Bringing the power of 3D printing to magnet manufacturing is attracting a lot of interest. Magnets are made of critical rare earth metals, such as neodymium, which are in short supply and high demand in the current push for electric cars and alternative energy. 3D printing can help reduce overuse of this material with its ability to create efficiently-shaped and -sized magnets without the time or expense of tooling. This also helps to quickly bring new designs to market. So what’s the hold-up? Beneath the surface, the most powerful permanent magnets have an organized granular structure that’s a challenge to recreate with a 3D print head.

Read the interesting in-depth article at ALL3DP.

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Breaking barriers in Medical through 3D Printing (Authentise Weekly News-In-Review – #123)

Customization options alone make 3D printing a natural fit for the medical sector. Now, the medical industry is embracing 3D printing in a number of even more exciting ways. The new approach that the technology provides to design and manufacture is laden with opportunities to improve upon established practices or to make entirely new ones possible. Just thinking of bioprinting a cornea to enable scarless healing of wounds in the eye may seem far-fetched, but it’s only one of the exciting realities of today. The risk of implant rejection by the body is close to being eliminated thanks to stem cells technologies or smart materials designed to dissolve once their scaffolding purpose has run its course. Looking at the horizon, 3D printing is the only feasible solution when it comes to addressing medical emergencies in space: astronauts won’t need to cross their fingers that their highly specialized medical tool came up on the latest rocket carrying supplies, but rather just instructs the in-situ printer to make it on the spot.

3D Printed Cornea Tissue Aims To Tackle Blindness

A 3D Bioprinted Cornea Stromal Lenticule. Photo via Pandorum Technologies Pvt.

Pandorum Technologies Pvt., a Bangalore-based biotechnology company, has used 3D bioprinted cornea tissue to promote scarless healing of wounds in the eye. In collaboration with India’s LV Prasad Eye Institute, the company created a bio-inspired corneal ink dubbed as ‘Liquid Cornea’ to 3D bioprint corneal lenticule – a disc-shaped piece of corneal tissue which can also be manufactured with synthetic materials. This is implanted into or on top of the human eye to treat visual impairment due to corneal defect.

Read the rest of the article here.

This startup is 3D printing breast implants for cancer survivors

Lattice Medical showcases the intricate forms that can be 3Dprinted.

[Lattice Medical] creates 3D-printed breast implants which, unlike common silicone implants, dissolve into the body after a year. But the real magic is that in that time the company has a method for regrowing the natural breast tissue so that patients are ultimately left with natural breasts after just a single operation.

Read the full article here.

3D printing medical devices in space

Astronauts face serious health issues, including hand injuries and risk of infection, during long duration space missions far from earth. Chile-based Copper 3D has received funding from NASA to test a new, 3D printing-based approach adapted for the unique space environment.

Keep reading at MedicalDevices Network.

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Bringing the future of eco-thinking through smarter manufacturing (Authentise Weekly News-In-Review – #122)

The impact that our human civilization is having on the environment is unprecedented and we need to be conscious and proactive about it. Fortunately, there are more benefits to be had through smart manufacturing technologies other than improved quality and lead times. By better monitoring the production process, we can avert hugely wasteful discrepancies, as NASA has been experiencing with faulty materials through 20 years (!!) of launches. Cutting edge tracking, monitoring and reporting tools, like Authentise 3Diax, enable companies to do just that, potentially saving millions of dollars. In parallel, new materials, designed to be recycled indefinitely and easily, will cast new light on everyday products and their construction. This is particularly important, as the mentality behind the design process has to change significantly to make the system work. Examples like the Apple AirPods show us how we must keep recyclability into much higher consideration, along with sources life-standards and production health concerns, when designing products that will help us preserve scarce resources and stay out of landfills.

NASA was sold faulty rocket parts for almost 20 years

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When the launch of NASA’s Orbiting Carbon Observatory and Glory missions failed in 2009 and 2011, the agency said it was because their launch vehicle malfunctioned. Now, a NASA Launch Services Program (LSP) investigation has revealed that the malfunction was caused by faulty aluminum materials. More importantly, the probe blew a 19-year fraud scheme perpetrated by Oregon aluminum extrusion manufacturer Sapa Profiles, Inc. wide open. LSP, along with NASA’s Office of the Inspector General and the US Department of Justice, have discovered the Sapa Profiles falsified critical tests on the aluminum it sold.

Read the full piece on Engadget.

Plastic Gets a Do-Over: Breakthrough Discovery Recycles Plastic From the Inside Out

A team of researchers at the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab) has designed a recyclable plastic that, like a Lego playset, can be disassembled into its constituent parts at the molecular level, and then reassembled into a different shape, texture, and color again and again without loss of performance or quality. The new material, called poly(diketoenamine), or PDK, was reported in the journal Nature Chemistry.

Read the rest here.

AirPods Are a Tragedy

AirPods are a product of the past. They’re plastic, made of some combination of carbon, hydrogen, oxygen, nitrogen, chlorine, and sulfur. They’re tungsten, tin, tantalum, lithium, and cobalt.

Humans extract these elements from the earth, heat them, refine them. As they work, humans breathe in airborne particles, which deposit in their lungs. The materials are shipped from places like Vietnam, South Africa, Kazakhstan, Peru, Mexico, Indonesia, and India, to factories in China. A literal city of workers creates four tiny computing chips and assembles them into a logic board. Sensors, microphones, grilles, and an antenna are glued together and packaged into a white, strange-looking plastic exoskeleton.

These are AirPods.

Read the rest of the article on Vice.

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Why “Edge Computing” is edging closer and closer (Authentise Weekly News-In-Review – #121)

There are various reasons to be excited about edge computing. It proposes a localized way to deal with data analysis, making individual nodes independent of a central hub. This offers greater levels of security, isolating data to where it needs to be processed, as well as quicker responsiveness, obtaining actionable insights without the need for data transfer. There are still a few roadblocks to sort before the technology becomes fully applicable to all industrial settings. Mainly, these have to do with the convergence of IT and OT fields, enabling easier communication and action. The technology is there when it comes to processing and data transfer. Next generation PLCs address the needs of an edge network, reducing complexity along with installation time and costs. In parallel, 5G connection will enable extremely fast communication for large volumes of data (already proving itself valuable for autonomous cars). Decentralizing operations, in manufacturing and elsewhere, will lead to more secure and optimized workflows.

Is IIoT Edge Computing Ready Yet?

Image of a cloud and edge computers linked to it

Edge computing is evolving because of the high demand to move computer processing closer to sensors to decrease latency and improve efficiency. The IoT device at the edge must be responsible for computing, storing and network connectivity, all in a small form factor. Depending on the requirement, processed data from the sensors can be sent to the cloud either in parts or all at once.

Read the full article here.

The IIoT Challenge

https://www.automationworld.com/Benson%20Hougland%2C%20Opto%2022

[…] getting that data from the edge of the network where it’s produced to the databases and people who need it can be a challenge. Communication for control as well as monitoring and data acquisition can be even tougher. For the IIoT applications we’re doing now, we need a new approach—a new product that does much more than a PLC or PAC, a product that shrinks the middleware and improves security. That product has recently appeared. It’s called EPIC—Edge Programmable Industrial Controller. Because an EPIC replaces middleware and reduces the steps required to get data, it reduces complexity, lessens security risks, and decreases the time and expense of installation and maintenance.

Read the full article at Automation World.

5G’s Important Role in Autonomous Car Technology

5G in the auto industry

The fifth-generation wireless technology is expected to connect almost everything around us with an ultra-fast, highly reliable, and fully responsive network. 5G will allow us to leverage the full potential of advanced technologies such as AI, VR, and the Internet of Things (IoT). Self-driving cars use hundreds of sensors to make vehicles faster and smarter. These sensors generate unprecedented amounts of data, much more than any other IoT adoption would. Handling, processing, and analyzing this amount of data requires a much faster network than the existing 4G technology. Autonomous cars, systems require incredible data processing capabilities and speeds needed to mimic the timing of human reflexes.

Read the rest here.

 

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