Breaking barriers in Medical through 3D Printing (Authentise Weekly News-In-Review – #123)

Customization options alone make 3D printing a natural fit for the medical sector. Now, the medical industry is embracing 3D printing in a number of even more exciting ways. The new approach that the technology provides to design and manufacture is laden with opportunities to improve upon established practices or to make entirely new ones possible. Just thinking of bioprinting a cornea to enable scarless healing of wounds in the eye may seem far-fetched, but it’s only one of the exciting realities of today. The risk of implant rejection by the body is close to being eliminated thanks to stem cells technologies or smart materials designed to dissolve once their scaffolding purpose has run its course. Looking at the horizon, 3D printing is the only feasible solution when it comes to addressing medical emergencies in space: astronauts won’t need to cross their fingers that their highly specialized medical tool came up on the latest rocket carrying supplies, but rather just instructs the in-situ printer to make it on the spot.

3D Printed Cornea Tissue Aims To Tackle Blindness

A 3D Bioprinted Cornea Stromal Lenticule. Photo via Pandorum Technologies Pvt.

Pandorum Technologies Pvt., a Bangalore-based biotechnology company, has used 3D bioprinted cornea tissue to promote scarless healing of wounds in the eye. In collaboration with India’s LV Prasad Eye Institute, the company created a bio-inspired corneal ink dubbed as ‘Liquid Cornea’ to 3D bioprint corneal lenticule – a disc-shaped piece of corneal tissue which can also be manufactured with synthetic materials. This is implanted into or on top of the human eye to treat visual impairment due to corneal defect.

Read the rest of the article here.

This startup is 3D printing breast implants for cancer survivors

Lattice Medical showcases the intricate forms that can be 3Dprinted.

[Lattice Medical] creates 3D-printed breast implants which, unlike common silicone implants, dissolve into the body after a year. But the real magic is that in that time the company has a method for regrowing the natural breast tissue so that patients are ultimately left with natural breasts after just a single operation.

Read the full article here.

3D printing medical devices in space

Astronauts face serious health issues, including hand injuries and risk of infection, during long duration space missions far from earth. Chile-based Copper 3D has received funding from NASA to test a new, 3D printing-based approach adapted for the unique space environment.

Keep reading at MedicalDevices Network.

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Bringing the future of eco-thinking through smarter manufacturing (Authentise Weekly News-In-Review – #122)

The impact that our human civilization is having on the environment is unprecedented and we need to be conscious and proactive about it. Fortunately, there are more benefits to be had through smart manufacturing technologies other than improved quality and lead times. By better monitoring the production process, we can avert hugely wasteful discrepancies, as NASA has been experiencing with faulty materials through 20 years (!!) of launches. Cutting edge tracking, monitoring and reporting tools, like Authentise 3Diax, enable companies to do just that, potentially saving millions of dollars. In parallel, new materials, designed to be recycled indefinitely and easily, will cast new light on everyday products and their construction. This is particularly important, as the mentality behind the design process has to change significantly to make the system work. Examples like the Apple AirPods show us how we must keep recyclability into much higher consideration, along with sources life-standards and production health concerns, when designing products that will help us preserve scarce resources and stay out of landfills.

NASA was sold faulty rocket parts for almost 20 years

453900main_launch2-m_946-710

When the launch of NASA’s Orbiting Carbon Observatory and Glory missions failed in 2009 and 2011, the agency said it was because their launch vehicle malfunctioned. Now, a NASA Launch Services Program (LSP) investigation has revealed that the malfunction was caused by faulty aluminum materials. More importantly, the probe blew a 19-year fraud scheme perpetrated by Oregon aluminum extrusion manufacturer Sapa Profiles, Inc. wide open. LSP, along with NASA’s Office of the Inspector General and the US Department of Justice, have discovered the Sapa Profiles falsified critical tests on the aluminum it sold.

Read the full piece on Engadget.

Plastic Gets a Do-Over: Breakthrough Discovery Recycles Plastic From the Inside Out

A team of researchers at the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab) has designed a recyclable plastic that, like a Lego playset, can be disassembled into its constituent parts at the molecular level, and then reassembled into a different shape, texture, and color again and again without loss of performance or quality. The new material, called poly(diketoenamine), or PDK, was reported in the journal Nature Chemistry.

Read the rest here.

AirPods Are a Tragedy

AirPods are a product of the past. They’re plastic, made of some combination of carbon, hydrogen, oxygen, nitrogen, chlorine, and sulfur. They’re tungsten, tin, tantalum, lithium, and cobalt.

Humans extract these elements from the earth, heat them, refine them. As they work, humans breathe in airborne particles, which deposit in their lungs. The materials are shipped from places like Vietnam, South Africa, Kazakhstan, Peru, Mexico, Indonesia, and India, to factories in China. A literal city of workers creates four tiny computing chips and assembles them into a logic board. Sensors, microphones, grilles, and an antenna are glued together and packaged into a white, strange-looking plastic exoskeleton.

These are AirPods.

Read the rest of the article on Vice.

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Why “Edge Computing” is edging closer and closer (Authentise Weekly News-In-Review – #121)

There are various reasons to be excited about edge computing. It proposes a localized way to deal with data analysis, making individual nodes independent of a central hub. This offers greater levels of security, isolating data to where it needs to be processed, as well as quicker responsiveness, obtaining actionable insights without the need for data transfer. There are still a few roadblocks to sort before the technology becomes fully applicable to all industrial settings. Mainly, these have to do with the convergence of IT and OT fields, enabling easier communication and action. The technology is there when it comes to processing and data transfer. Next generation PLCs address the needs of an edge network, reducing complexity along with installation time and costs. In parallel, 5G connection will enable extremely fast communication for large volumes of data (already proving itself valuable for autonomous cars). Decentralizing operations, in manufacturing and elsewhere, will lead to more secure and optimized workflows.

Is IIoT Edge Computing Ready Yet?

Image of a cloud and edge computers linked to it

Edge computing is evolving because of the high demand to move computer processing closer to sensors to decrease latency and improve efficiency. The IoT device at the edge must be responsible for computing, storing and network connectivity, all in a small form factor. Depending on the requirement, processed data from the sensors can be sent to the cloud either in parts or all at once.

Read the full article here.

The IIoT Challenge

https://www.automationworld.com/Benson%20Hougland%2C%20Opto%2022

[…] getting that data from the edge of the network where it’s produced to the databases and people who need it can be a challenge. Communication for control as well as monitoring and data acquisition can be even tougher. For the IIoT applications we’re doing now, we need a new approach—a new product that does much more than a PLC or PAC, a product that shrinks the middleware and improves security. That product has recently appeared. It’s called EPIC—Edge Programmable Industrial Controller. Because an EPIC replaces middleware and reduces the steps required to get data, it reduces complexity, lessens security risks, and decreases the time and expense of installation and maintenance.

Read the full article at Automation World.

5G’s Important Role in Autonomous Car Technology

5G in the auto industry

The fifth-generation wireless technology is expected to connect almost everything around us with an ultra-fast, highly reliable, and fully responsive network. 5G will allow us to leverage the full potential of advanced technologies such as AI, VR, and the Internet of Things (IoT). Self-driving cars use hundreds of sensors to make vehicles faster and smarter. These sensors generate unprecedented amounts of data, much more than any other IoT adoption would. Handling, processing, and analyzing this amount of data requires a much faster network than the existing 4G technology. Autonomous cars, systems require incredible data processing capabilities and speeds needed to mimic the timing of human reflexes.

Read the rest here.

 

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The experimental, and unregulated, field of Bioprinting (Authentise Weekly News-In-Review – #120)

Bioprinting is a squishy topic. It sounds good in its sci-fi theory but when you nail down the practical aspects it becomes much more complicated. The research is being done to bring that vision to reality, making over-the-top announcements, from vascular tissues to entire patient-specific heart 3D printing, that mislead the reader into thinking we might already live in the future. However, there are ethical and legal conundrums to consider alongside the technical hurdles. The field is so new that legislators struggle to comprehend what’s being done in the present day, let alone what will be possible tomorrow. Bioprinting is a concoction of frontier fields like stem cells, gene editing, and biocompatible materials. Researchers are taking unorthodox approaches to the problems they face, even employing generative textile designers to design organic structures. There will need to be safety regulations, protocols, all angles still need to be figured out. After all, we’re talking about our bodies, and we don’t want defective software or printing processes to pose any kind of risk.

Nervous System Works with Rice University Researchers 3D Printing Vascular Networks

Nervous System has been heavily engaged in experimenting with 3D and 4D printing of textiles in the past years, and all their research is paying off now as they find themselves engaged in the realm of tissue engineering. Assistant professor Jordan Miller [from Rice University] invited the Nervous System team to join his researchers on an incredible journey to fabricate examples of possible vascular networks via bioprinting—harnessing their knowledge of software and materials to find a way to create soft hydrogels.

Read the article here.

Scientists Create World’s First 3D-Printed Heart Using Patient’s Own Cells

Researchers at Tel Aviv University have successfully printed the world’s first 3D heart using a patient’s own cells and biological materials to “completely match the immunological, cellular, biochemical, and anatomical properties of the patient.” Until now, researchers have only been able to 3D-print simple tissues lacking blood vessels.

“This heart is made from human cells and patient-specific biological materials. In our process these materials serve as the bioinks, substances made of sugars and proteins that can be used for 3D printing of complex tissue models,” said lead researcher Tal Dvir in a statement.

Read the article here.

Bioprinting: What are the Legal Implications of Defective Design Software?

3D printing has taken off at lightning speed, with innovations emerging around the world continually—and virtually unregulated. While there may be some serious discussions and expectations regarding ownership and common sense regarding designs, most of the legal angles are still in the embryonic stages.

“In the medical 3D bioprinting field, three theories are, in principle, relevant to the protection of the patient against injuries that are attributable to defective CAD software: (i) medical malpractice (a subset of negligence law), (ii) breach of warranty under the Uniform Commercial Code (UCC), and (iii) strict liability,” states researcher Jamil Ammar. “None of these theories, however, adequately address the range of injuries that could potentially arise due to use of defective CAD software.”

Read the full article at 3DPrint.com

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AM for production is already here (Authentise Weekly News-In-Review – #119)

Production level AM seems a far cry for many in the manufacturing industry. However, we have many examples of how businesses are starting to put the technology to work on the factory floor. Leading the march is the aviation industry, with companies like Airbus 3D printing thousands of aircraft components today, shaving off weight and increasing reliability. Right up second is automotive, with companies like Bugatti and GM redesigning car parts through AM, and putting them in cars roaming the streets today. Also, the footwear industry has been keen to adopt AM as both a marketing strategy and a serious production boon. Improved customization and agility got the attention of companies like Nike, Adidas and Under Armour, creating both limited editions and mass-produced soles and shoe components.

 

Premium AEROTEC 3D Printing Serially Produced Parts For All Airbus A350 XWB Aircraft

A few years ago Airbus said that it would have over a 1000 3D printed components on each aircraft. Subsidiary Airbus Helicopters has for a few months now been serially producing metal door latch shafts for the A350. Now Premium Aerotec, itself also an Airbus subsidiary, will start serially producing metal 3D printed components for the A350 as well. These have now entered into serial production and have been delivered to Airbus.

Read the full article here.

 

Bugatti champions 3D-printed parts

The Divo supercar, with its $5.8 million starting price, was one of the stars of last summer’s Monterey Car Week. It achieved a 77-pound weight reduction from the Bugatti Chiron on which it is based, with some coming from more precisely made 3D printed taillights. Last year, it revealed that it has worked with tech suppliers Bionic Production and Fraunhofer IAPT to develop an eight-piston, titanium monobloc brake caliper via 3D printing. Bugatti says that part is being prepared for series production.

Read the rest here.

 

Five footwear industry leaders using 3D printing for production today

adidas concept shoe

Leading footwear AM companies – Adidas, Nike, Under Armour, New Balance, and Reebok – are targeting different footwear final parts and products, relying on different technologies and materials. However, there are some common trends which are based on the overall macro trend of advanced manufacturing: mass customization and digital mass production.

Read the full analysis at 3D Printing Media Network.

 

 

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IIoT is the future of workplace safety (Authentise Weekly News-In-Review – #118)

The increasingly connected systems in place at the factory floors are enabling safer workplaces. The most straightforward approach here is to don workers with sensors that can detect hazardous environment parameters like air quality and temperature or even automatically alert someone if they are injured. In most cases, however, it’s about bypassing the need for human workers to do dangerous tasks. Technologies like predictive analytics can do tremendous work in alerting supervisors before parts get broken and become hazards. Similar smart systems need to be put in place when cooperative robotics start working alongside human counterparts. Using machine learning and computer vision, safety can be guaranteed as robots can have comprehensive knowledge of their surroundings and predict human actions, as well as maximizing the robot’s effectiveness.

Using IIoT-Connected Devices for Worker Health & Safety

IBM announced collaborations with Garmin, Guardhat, Mitsufuji and SmartCone to help organizations monitor their workers’ safety with Watson IoT. Source: IBM

Workplace safety is important in any field. For example, in my line of work, I’m always vigilant of dangers from hot coffee, eye strain, or paper cuts. But in industrial environments such as the manufacturing, petrochemical, or mining industries, the potential dangers are more severe. That’s why researchers and engineers are exploring new ways to use industry 4.0 technology to protect the health and safety of industrial workers.

Read the full article here.

How IoT and Computer Vision Can Enhance Industrial Safety

Welder's safety is protected by IoT

Using IoT sensors can feed the algorithm with real-time data and allow it to make decisions on the spot. For example, if sensors detect gas leakage, increased temperatures or unwanted humidity, work can stop at once or at the very least inform the floor manager. These type of decisions are deterministic and don’t provide much insight into the future. Another way of creating a safer environment is to use the power of computers and machine learning. By creating different scenarios, the algorithm can sense the difference between what is safe and what is not.

Read the rest here.

Collaborative Robots Learn to Collaborate

An automated mobile robot (AMR) uses 3d vision and machine learning to navigate in a more natural manner past a person moving a cart in a warehouse aisle.

To be truly collaborative, robots must be capable of more than working safely alongside human beings. Russell Toris, director of robotics at Fetch Robotics, says robots also need to act (and “think”) more like people. This is particularly true of autonomous mobile robots (AMRs) like those manufactured by Fetch. Typically employed for material transport and data collection (such as counting inventory), these wheeled systems use vision sensors and navigation software to dynamically adapt to new environments and situations. Increasingly common in warehouses and distribution centers, this technology is likely to spread to other applications and industries, including our own.

Read the full article here.

 

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Between the tech and results there is a big skill gap (Authentise Weekly News-In-Review – #117)

The best technology and infrastructure won’t do if what’s missing is a properly skilled team to make it work and translate into actionable insights. IIOT is more than a great marketing pitch, there are enormous benefits for companies willing to make the investment: increased operational monitoring and insights, predictive analytics and much more. However, it is an ever-changing field, with no lack of dangers and optimizations to be made along the way. As such, it is hard to find employees with the right skill set to approach the challenge. This goes for additive manufacturing too, with companies ready to invest in machines but unsure whether they have the right personnel to get the operation going. Fortunately, there are many initiatives that have popped up from this specific need and hope to educate people not only on the technical know-how but also on the importance of these new technologies for the future of manufacturing.

Lack of Expertise Makes Predictive Maintenance a Challenge for Manufacturers despite Promise of IIoT

Predictive maintenance is one element of the industrial Internet of Things (IIoT) that can help manufacturers increase productivity, streamline operations, improve efficiency and reduce costs – but global manufacturing companies are finding it a struggle to implement production-level IIoT projects, according to research from Bain & Company. The majority say it has been more difficult to reach scale with the IIoT than they had anticipated – particularly in terms of predictive maintenance – and their expectations have dropped slightly. Lack of technical expertise and integration struggles are slowing adoption.

Read the full article here.

New initiative to boost digital skills in manufacturing sector

Senior Minister of State for Trade and Industry Koh Poh Koon trying out a drone demonstration unit yesterday at the inaugural Aerospace Engineering Week at ITE College Central, where he also launched the Worker 4.0 Digital Readiness Certificate. The

A new training programme has been launched to help manufacturing workers pick up digital skills such as coding and using emerging technology. The Worker 4.0 Digital Readiness Certificate, which is made up of 17 short modules, will be offered to at least 1,000 workers in manufacturing industries this year. National Trades Union Congress (NTUC) deputy secretary-general Koh Poh Koon said yesterday that the scheme should help to bridge the skills gap faced by technicians and associate professionals (TAPs).

Read the rest at Strait Times.

Phillips Corporation Launches Additive Manufacturing Training Services For Federal Facilities

Phillips Corporation, a Maryland-based supplier of industrial machinery solutions, has launched an additive manufacturing training service for federal facilities called MyAM.

“With MyAM, customers will be able to move from ideation to creation and prototype to production safely, efficiently, and rapidly,” said Howard Marotto, part of Phillips Business Development team. “This will enable increased productivity, performance, and innovation in ways previously unachievable with traditional training tools and manufacturing techniques.”

Keep reading here.

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“New space” Industry is heating up, thanks to 3D Printing (Authentise Weekly News-In-Review – #116)

The “new space” industry is a hotbed for innovation. A lot of venture capital is being poured into companies promising to reach for the stars and open the doors to the new frontier of exploration, and market opportunities. 3D printing is the slogan behind many of these endeavors, and for good reason. Setting up shop in space one needs to take into account the many limitations therein. The price per Kg to launch stuff to space is in the thousands, but it’s being reduced by lighter crafts (thanks 3D printing!) and reusable rockets. At this point, one can imagine that exploiting local resources must be a top priority. In-situ resource utilization is the best hope for self-supporting habitats from the Moon to Mars and beyond, and NASA has been hosting design competitions based on 3D printing to make these concepts a reality. The industry has been gathering funds for years now and is starting to see real traction with companies signing multi-year contracts with satellite companies, complete rocket re-design and more. It’s a great time to be alive for space nerds!

 

ESA’s New 3D Printer Will Defy Build Volume Restraints As Well As Gravity

Crew working inside the International Space Station. Photo via NatGeo/ISS: 24/7 ON A SPACE STATION

In January 2019, the European Space Agency (ESA) and German technology group OHB SE launched a consortium to develop a large-scale 3D printer for use in zero-gravity conditions. […] One of the biggest revelations is that the 3D printer in development will reportedly be able to produce objects larger than itself – unconstrained by the size of the print bed.

Read the full story here.

 

NASA Announces $100,000 Winners of Virtual 3D-Printed Mars Habitats

One of the winning teams of a NASA competition to make a full-scale Mars habitat using modeling software, Team SEArch+/Apis Cor, designed this Martian abode, which is built from the upper part of a Hercules Single-Stage Reusable Vehicle.

NASA picked three teams to share a $100,000 prize from a competition to make virtual Martian habitats. The 11 participating groups were tasked with making a full-scale habitat using modeling software, building on an earlier stage of the competition that required partial virtual modeling. The teams were graded on their layout, programming, use of interior space, and their habitat’s ability to be scaled to full size for construction, according to a NASA statement announcing the winners.

Read the rest here.

 

Relativity, the 3D-printed-rocket manufacturer, inks a multi-year contract with Telesat

RR_OnPad.4k6_3

Relativity, the Los Angeles-based manufacturer of 3D-printed rockets, has signed its first public commercial contract with Telesat, the longtime vendor of satellite services for telecommunications and business information. The deal marks the first agreement between a major satellite operator and an entirely venture-backed company in the “New Space” industry and is a huge win for Relativity’s low-cost rocket manufacturing platform.

Read the rest of the article at Techcrunch.

 

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Data is king: what to expect from AMUG (Authentise Weekly News-In-Review – #115)

AMUG is here! We’re in the Expo at booth B37, come to say hi to our team!

Although not all AM companies have already revealed their cards right from the get-go, we already have a feeling for what is going to be a strong trend at this year’s user group event: data. Hardware has come to the point where optimizations need to happen elsewhere to see true production AM come to fruition. That means using smart frameworks and analytical software to iron out the deficiencies, making AM into a reliable production tool. Identifying defects before printing ever happens is key to minimize time and material loss. A collaboration between AlphaSTAR & Raytheon has created a workflow for the qualification of missile parts, thus not only perfecting the manufacturing process but also guaranteeing a part that is up to industry standards. We at Authentise have very recently announced a partnership with Microsoft to enable intuitive automations from within their Flow platform, further enhancing the power of our customer’s digital thread. Our guess is that it’s not the last we’ll hear of movement in data strategies from the event. Big players are investing more and more into machine learning and AI projects to get new insights into their operations and potential new avenues for innovation.

AlphaSTAR & Raytheon to present ‘Qualification of an AM Missile’ at AMUG 2019

[…] AlphaSTAR Corporation and Raytheon have cooperated on a project to predict the Additive Manufacturing Process and Service Loading of an as-built additively manufactured part. Using an ICMSE framework, and feeding through a building block Verification, Validation and Accreditation (VVA), the teams set out with the goal of identifying part issues before building the component, thus saving time, lowering risk and reducing scrap rate.

Read the full article at Metal AM.

Authentise Empowers Manufacturing Operators through Collaboration with Microsoft

Active Flow

Authentise has agreed to a multi-year collaboration with Microsoft to utilize Microsoft Azure and integrate Authentise’s workflow management system into Microsoft Flow. The integration with Flow, which goes live this week on the Microsoft Flow Gallery, gives operators directly involved in additive manufacturing quoting, production and analytics processes the opportunity to create their own automations without any coding knowledge.

Read the full press release here.

McDonald’s Bites On Big Data With $300 Million Acquisition

McDonald’s is set to announce that it has reached an agreement to acquire Dynamic Yield, a startup based in Tel Aviv that provides retailers with algorithmically driven “decision logic” technology. When you add an item to an online shopping cart, it’s the tech that nudges you about what other customers bought as well.

Read the full article on Wired.

 

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3D printing scalability: more than a hardware problem (Authentise Weekly News-In-Review – #114)

One of the major hindrances to 3D printing’s expansion right now is scalability. How can a process tailored and designed for customization also be an ideal candidate for the highly systematized environment of a production facility? How can it be employed to retain its features like agility and flexibility while providing the level of performance required to make a business profitable? The answer is multifaceted, and it has to do with the technology itself as well as the infrastructure that we build around it. Researchers are working towards designing printing techniques that are both reliable and efficient at various scales, and significant strides have been made in that regard. In parallel, one must consider the surrounding pieces of this puzzle, such as an automated pipeline and a smart, data-driven decision-making platform. It just cannot work if you couple 3D printing technologies with the old way of making factories work. In many respects, we must rely on AIs and robotic systems to make informed decisions. We are already starting to make this vision come to life, with IIoT networks feeding into simulations and triggering automated processes. Authentise is the leader in data-driven automation for production scale 3D printing: we already use machine learning algorithms to drive our estimation processes and thorough automation features throughout our 3Diax platform, and are excited to show you more of what we are working on very soon!

Israeli company announces tiny triumph in micron-level 3D printing

Nanofabrica micron-level 3D-printed part

Startup Nanofabrica (Tel Aviv) announced that it has developed an AM platform that provides an end-to-end bespoke process for manufacturers seeking micron and sub-micron levels of resolution and surface finish. Nanofabrica’s AM process is based on digital light processing (DLP), which is combined with adaptive optics to achieve repeatable micron levels of resolution. This tool in conjunction with an array of sensors allows for a closed feedback loop.

Read the full article on Plastic Today.

Scalable platform 3D prints bone

3D printed construct

Researchers from Syracuse University have achieved significant progress towards the engineering of large-scale bone tissue scaffolds. Stephen Sawyer and colleagues have designed, built and tested a scalable platform for the structured growth of bone mineral using only a commercially available 3D printer and inexpensive materials. The design surpassed previous difficulties associated with the supply of oxygen to bone growing cells. Traditional designs relied on oxygen diffusion through the cell containing structure, which had, until now, limited the size of bone structures that could be built.

Read the rest here.

Brain code can now be copied for AI, robots, say researchers

Modeling robotics on the human brain

Researchers at the Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology (KAIST), the University of Cambridge, Japan’s National Institute for Information and Communications Technology (NICT), and Google DeepMind have argued that our understanding of how humans make intelligent decisions has now reached a critical point. Robot intelligence can be significantly enhanced by mimicking strategies that the human brain uses when we make decisions in our everyday lives, they said.

Read the full article here.

We are going to exhibit at AMUG! Come visit us at booth #37 from March 31st – April 4th.

AMUG_2019_Booth_Map

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