Automation and the role of the human (Authentise Weekly News-In-Review – Week 22)

Automation is an unstoppable force for change within pretty much every advanced human industry. It has already been reported that it’s having an impact on low-skilled jobs. Nonetheless, there are many other implications to automation are tremendous. The ability to gather data from distant, and often dangerous, environments without human intervention is no small feat, as is the uplifted capability to simulate and analyze factories’ digital twins in order to obtain predictive insights. A changing scenario brings about new opportunities for improvement: IIoT solutions need to be kept updated to new cyber security standards and much work can still be done to improve the benefits of such solutions. There’s clearly still a lot of work for humans to do. Researchers are needed now more than ever to create the building blocks of the automation future, one that is already here but has still a long way to go.

PS: Have you seen the chapter on Cyberphysical security for Industry 4.0  that our CTO and CEO co- wrote?

New Study Finds That Six Jobs Are Lost for Every Robot Added to the Workforce

Screen Shot 2017-05-20 at 3.34.38 PM

Now, a new paper released by the National Bureau of Economic Research (NBER) puts an actual number to the threat of automation: each industrial robot introduced in the workforce between 1990 and 2007 coincided with the elimination of 6.2 jobs within the commuting area. Wages also saw a slight drop of between .25-.50% per 1,000 employees when one or more robots was added to their workforce.

Read the full article at Futurism.

Seeing double — digital twins & the future of IIoT

DigitalTwin

Digital twin technology has been trending in the news for quite a while, yet it should be no surprise that it’s in IIoT where the concept of a virtual representation of a physical product or system will be the most valuable. The digital twin has a natural home in the IIoT. The components of a CAD model–the design parameters, the operating state, the environment–can all be elements of the digital twin representation. Think of the twin as a body where nerve endings live in the sensors deployed on the machines. The digital twin paradigm enables manufacturers to do two things: operate factories efficiently and gain timely insights into the performance of the products manufactured in these factories.

Read the full article at Smart Industry.

Researchers and defenders needed in IIoT

industrial refinery energy plant oil gas

The Internet of Things and IIoT are causing a lot of security headaches, mostly because these devices and the solutions used to secure them are still in the nascent stages of being developed and coming to market. Phil Neray, CyberX’s vice president of industrial cyber security, said even though the federal government has classified all of these as critical infrastructure, “The fact is that all of these devices were designed a long time ago.” With their age comes the issue that the protocols used to communicate were designed before anyone really understood the vulnerabilities in them. Neray said, “They lack many of the features we take for granted in cyber, and that leaves room for lots of zero days.”

Read more here.

 

That’s it for this week’s edition, don’t forget to check back next week for another News-In-Review. Also, our Twitter feed is filled with news on AM and IIoT so don’t forget to subscribe there as well!

RAPID: AM Future in Mass Manufacturing (Authentise Weekly News-In-Review – Week 21)

This week was RAPID‘s week. The news outlets were populated with interesting announcements, from innovative processes to new products, pushing AM’s boundary even further. And there is one thing of which RAPID this year was a testament to: AM is going full-throttle towards mass manufacturing. As a prototyping technology it has far surpassed traditional production means and now the industry is betting big that it will permeate the factory plant of tomorrow. Through process and size improvements, production logistic systems and a software arsenal that is capable of effectively integrating AM within the manufacturing plant workflow, all the issues preventing AM to be utilized in a mass manufacturing environment will be dealt with. Manufacturing processes will go hybrid, symbiotically allowing us to achieve so much more. AM is the missing piece of the multitool of the future.

3D Hybrid Solutions with Multiax to launch “world’s largest metal 3D printer” at RAPID

The large format CNC machine made by Multiax. Image via 3D Hybrid Solutions.

 

3D Hybrid Solutions has announced it will launch a large-scale metal 3D printer at RAPID 2017 following a collaboration with CNC machining company Multiax. Based in Philadelphia, 3D Hybrid Solutions develops additive manufacturing tools for existing CNC machinery. The joint venture, which will be unveiled in Pittsburgh during the RAPID conference, combines this expertise with Multiax’s large-scale 5-axis CNC machines. Resulting in a machine which the company claims is “the world’s largest metal 3D printer” with a build chamber of “500 cubic meters.” According to 3D Hybrid Solutions, not only will the system be the largest metal 3D printer, it “will also be one of the fastest metal 3D printers with speeds beyond 20 pounds per hour.”

Read the full story here.

BLACKBELT unveils 3D printer on a conveyor belt for continuous FDM printing

The machine is perfect for creating large horizontal parts like signs. Photo via Blackbelt.

Aimed at producing large-scale, continuous prints and for series production, the Blackbelt machine brings a new way of thinking about 3D printing. Conveyor belts are often associated with factory production and it seems appropriate for Blackbelt’s device to incorporate this belt system. The Blackbelt 3D printer houses its 3 print heads on an X-Y actuation system, with the Z-axis in the form of a conveyor belt. This allows for theoretically infinite sized horizontal parts. The idea of infinite size is something Stratasys is addressing with its Infinite Build 3D printer. The device is currently undergoing testing at Ford Motors.

Read more here.

Innovative Uses of Geometric Search to Advance Additive Manufacturing

Assessing CAD data effectively and accurately is the first step to efficient and successful build processes. Many such processes, such as quoting, increasingly rely on cloud applications and require distribution of sensitive IP. For some industries that is unacceptable. Sending CAD data off-site can be the biggest roadblock to developing sophisticated process automation. As a solution, we apply existing geometric search algorithms to identify similar, white-listed designs that can be used in place of sensitive IP. By using a similar design that has been pre-screened for export we eliminate security issues. We’ve found that seamless, secure benchmarking and quoting operations are possible while maintaining strict security policies. In this presentation, we’ll discuss several potential use cases for geometric search including identifying previously fulfilled orders to compare the overall cost to produce or the ability to identify potential suppliers. We’ll also discuss drawbacks of using geometric search and limitations of our techniques. Tools such as geometric search have a variety of uses if used intelligently and can help businesses maintain control of sensitive IP.

 

Don’t forget to come back next week for another edition of the News-In-Review. Also, our Twitter account is very active, come check us out!

 

Impact & Advance of Machine Vision (Authentise Weekly News-In-Review – Week 20)

The industrial world has gained, in the past years, thousands of new eyes and ears thanks to sensors and cameras capable of delivering useful data. The added information capacity allows automation to take hold on tasks with higher degrees of complexity. At the same time it is enabling procedures and operations which not only provide innovative ways to achieve certain objectives but also to save time and money in the process. Metrology instrumentation is becoming more accessible than ever, making custom prosthetics a more feasible prospective for medical institutions. Similarly, medical scans allow doctors to drastically cut pre-operation planning and surgical time, resulting in hefty savings. Lastly, machine vision and inspection is bringing a new era of food handling from farms, improving the process’ quality and ultimately the customer experience.

Nikon Metrology inspection technology and additive manufacturing advance patient-specific implants

A Lithuanian medical company has leveraged Nikon Metrology inspection equipment to advance the production of jaw implants. Ortho Baltic, is one of only three manufacturers of patient-specific temporomandibular joint endoprostheses in Europe. In 2012, Ortho Baltic made an investment into additive manufacturing technology, and more recently the company acquired computed tomography (CT) inspection equipment for quality control from Nikon Metrology. The temporomandibular joint (TMJ) is one of the most used joints in the human body, allowing humans to talk and chew. When this joint is damaged, whether it be by trauma or illness, and typical treatment methods have been ineffective, replacement surgery is required. Patient-specific implants are usually reserved for more severe cases, but Ortho Baltic wants to make the administering of tailored endoprostheses the norm.

Read more here.

3D printing helps Queen Elizabeth Hospital reduce surgical planning time by 93%

By using a Stratasys Objet Eden350V 3D Printer, Queen Elizabeth Hospital in Birmingham, UK are saving three to four hours in surgical time per surgery, and costs are reduced by up to £20,000 per operation. The hospital had previously outsourced its 3D printing requirements and have now installed an in-house 3D printer to facilitate life-changing maxillofacial surgeries. According to Stratasys 3D printing has, “revolutionized pre-surgical procedures across a number of departments. This includes the maxillofacial (face and jaw); burns and plastics; ear, nose and throat; and neurosurgery units.”

Read more here.

How Robotic Automation Will Benefit Food and Agriculture

Automation technology is now spilling out of industries such as automotive and electronics and into food and agriculture – and it couldn’t be too soon. Jack Uhl, sales manager – CPG (Consumer Products Group) for Yaskawa America, Inc.’s Motoman Robotics Division recently wrote a compelling blog post outlining how “food just got faster.” In the post, Uhl makes an analogy to the wheel that is the food industry and how automation must become the rim tying the spokes together.

Read the full article at Engineering.

 

As always, don’t forget to check out our Twitter profile for more news and come back next week for another edition of the News-In-Review!

Our Autonomous, Decentralized Future (Authentise Weekly News-In-Review – Week 19)

Ever since the first applications in the Ford automotive pipeline, industrial automation has taken giant steps in assuring a both voluminous and efficient production process. Nonetheless, the centralized framework on which it has thrived does no longer provide an optimal economy for today’s hyper-connected society and infrastructure. Highly automated systems are being put in place to intelligently tackle manufacturing issues, capable of addressing objectives in a decentralized manner. IIoT is a prime example of this, where edge computing combines data collection, analysis and action outside the realm of influence of a central authority. An open source framework, coupled with a mix of microservices is a sound answer to what the future of industrial automation might be. Similarly, AM’s flexible nature is making it possible to rethink manufacturing operations. Small, low-cost machines can work autonomously and in parallel in order to manage various production orders intelligently. Even more farsightedly, Siemens envisions swarms of 3D printing robots capable of subdividing bigger prints into smaller units, working in-situ.

The Move to a Common Open IoT Framework

Loosely-Coupled Microservice Platform Architecture. Source: EdgeX Foundry

In order for the [IIoT] to truly take off, connecting devices to the cloud—or on the edge of the network— needs to be fast, easy and affordable. It is also important that the suppliers of automation technology embrace open standards so that these “things” are interoperable. […] This week, Opto 22 takes its commitment to open standards a step further with the announcement that it has joined The Linux Foundation as a silver level member. According to Opto 22, this strategic move is the company doing its part to “spearhead the adoption of open-source technology in the industrial automation and process control industries, and accelerate the rollout of Industrial Internet of Things application.”

Read more at Automation World.

Markforged plans large-scale digital metal manufacturing with 3D print farms

Sintering multiple 17-4 Stainless Steel Sprockets. Image via Markforged.

The future of metal 3D printing is in print farms says Markforged CEO, Greg Mark. While a number of companies are attempting to create machinery capable of industrial metal 3D printing, Greg Mark believes these “large-format metal printers will be replaced by smaller, low-cost machines working in parallel – print-farms.”

3D metal print-farms will shorten development time, closing the gap between prototyping and production.

Markforged intends to develop a system that allows for rapid production of strong metal parts. For Markforged, farming is the solution for large scale metal 3D printing production. Currently, 3D printing farms are mainly working with plastics.

Read more of their AM farm plans here.

Siemens Contemplating “Swarm” 3D Printing?

Siemens’ experimental production robot.

A report on Forbes details work undertaken by Siemens to develop a “mobile robotic 3D printer” concept. The curious-looking small robot was developed last year and since then has served as an experimental platform for developing software for future production use.

[…] some day, the same software that is helping the robotic spiders crawl the floor while avoiding obstacles and keeping their printing parts in balance could enable whole new systems of factory work – on tasks much more complex than assembling handheld toys.

For example, a team of robots could work together on a new kind of fuselage cylinder for airplanes. If each robot could attack the job from a different angle, they might build complex shapes together that no single printer could create by itself.

Read more about Siemens undertaking here.

 

Don’t forget to come back in a week time to read another edition of the News-In-Review right here at Authentise. Also, come by our Twitter profile to get more, unreported news.

Want disruptive? I’ll give you disruptive (Authentise Weekly News-In-Review – Week 18)

We are all starting to realize that AM is becoming the game changer it promised to be. This week there are mind-blowing examples of the technology being used to radically change the game economically and logistically all across the board. What do you think will be the impact on the manufacturing industry now that players realize that AM can bring shave costs in the millions of dollars like Boeing had on its Dreamliner production in collaboration with Norsk Titanium? Or when serialized production turnaround happens in days instead of months like Oracle managed to achieve with Carbon technology? On a wider note, AM will radically transform planning for operations where in-situ manufacturing is possible, making it much more economically viable to make use of local resources, especially in space activities.

3D Printing Titanium Parts Could Save Boeing Millions on Dreamliner Production

A 3D printed structural titanium component made with Norsk’s proprietary Rapid Plasma Deposition (RPD) process.

Boeing hired Norsk Titanium to print the first structural titanium parts for its 787 Dreamliner, a shift that the Norwegian 3D printing company said would eventually shave $2M to $3M off the cost of each plane. Strong, lightweight titanium alloy is 7 times more costly than aluminum, and accounts for about $17 million of the cost of a $265 million Dreamliner, industry sources say.
Boeing has been trying to reduce titanium costs on the 787, which requires more of the metal than other models because of its carbon-fiber fuselage and wings.

“This means $2M to $3M in savings for each Dreamliner, at least,” starting in 2018 when many more parts are being printed, Chip Yates, Norsk Titanium’s vice president of marketing, said in a telephone interview.

Read more about the collaboration here.

Carbon 3D print series of 10,000 parts for Oracle Labs servers

The 3D model (left) and a 3D printed branch (right) of the brackets stacked one on top of the other. Image & photo via Carbon

Oracle Labs, the R&D branch of multinational computer technology corporation Oracle, has used Carbon CLIP technology to 3D print a series of end-use brackets for use in its micro servers. 10,000 of the parts were needed to align circuit boards in the systems, and production was turned around within days instead of months. At first, Oracle planned on a component design reliant upon injection molding to hold the circuit boards. This method proved to be ineffective at producing such small parts within the required time frame, and the method didn’t support multiple design iterations.

“Instead of printing parts by inch CLIP let us print parts by hour. That’s game changing” – Craig Stephen, Senior Vice President Research & Development at Oracle Labs.

Read the full article at 3DPI.

Mining Materials for 3D Printing in Space

The first part 3D-printed from metal harvested from a meteorite. (Courtesy of Planetary Resources)

“Everything has a finite amount of resources. Everything has a cost and benefit”.

With limited resources, how can we populate multiple planets with only one livable environment? Fortunate for us, all of our resources originated in space. Planetary Resources made a point at the CES 2016 that mining asteroids was the future. It did this by using 3D printing and metal from a meteorite to produce a part. In addition, 3D printing may be the process of how things are built in space. Scientists have already 3D printed plastic objects in space, and they believe we can 3D-print metals. However, it might be simpler than this. If water freezes on the surface of the planets we are looking to build on, and there is hydrogen and water as a resource on these bodies, 3D printing ice in the shape of buildings might provide a robust housing. Sound nuts? NASA didn’t think so and awarded $25,000 to a team that designed a Mars Ice House for NASA’s 3D printed habitat challenge.

Read more about our space-faring possibilities at Machine Design.

 

Come back next week for another edition of News-In-Review and touch base at our Twitter feed where we share more AM and IIoT related news!

Tackling AM bottlenecks (Authentise Weekly News-In-Review – Week 17)

AM is bringing unprecedented capabilities to the industrial world but its technologies are still mostly experimental and much is being researched. Nonetheless, these bottlenecks are being addressed as we speak through sheer research and, on a higher level, by achieving the proper certification to make it into the real world. Researchers are putting under the spotlight every step of the AM process and have discovered a flaw which, if fixed, could dramatically speed up the whole process.  Crucial certifications’ specifics have been met by the team at Norsk Titanium in providing flight proof structural aircraft parts, the first to ever do so. Similarly, the complex system for complete AM industrialization is being finalized by Adidas to bring 3D printed shoes to mass-production.

 

New Research Could Help Speed Up the 3D Printing Process

A team of researchers from Binghamton University, State University of New York and MIT have identified some bottlenecks in 3D printers, that, if improved, could speed up the entire process. “We found that the rate at which a polymer melts is limiting in many implementations,” said Scott Schiffres, Binghamton Assistant Professor of Mechanical Engineering. “The pressure required to push the polymer through the nozzle is a sharp function of temperature. If the core is not hot enough, the printer will not be able to squeeze the polymer through the nozzle.”

Read the full article here.

 

Norsk Titanium 3D prints world’s first approved, structural, titanium components for commercial flight

The 3D printed and finished 787 Dreamliner component. Photo via Norsk Titanium

Norwegian aerospace additive manufacturing specialists Norsk Titanium AS has released details of a parts order from multinational aircraft corporation Boeing. According to Norsk, the ordered components will make the Boeing 787 Dreamliner the “first commercial airplane to fly with certified additive-manufactured titanium parts in structural applications.”

Read the full article at 3D Printing Industry.

 

How 3D Printing Will Optimize Your Next Pair of Running Shoes

custom shoes 3D printing

In the second half of 2017, Adidas is bringing [a new] level of customization to the U.S. with its Speedfactory, a production facility in the Atlanta area. Its goal is to deliver cutting-edge manufacturing and produce more shoes with “advanced complexity in color, materials, and sizes” for U.S.-based retailers and consumers. “The vision of Speedfactory is about making customized and personalized footwear for all people,” says Ben Herath, vice president of global design. “We’re bringing shoe manufacturing closer to the people and speeding up the manufacturing time.”

See the development story of 3D printed shoes here.

 

Don’t forget to follow us on Twitter to get more AM/IIoT related news and see you back next week for the next edition of News-In-Review!

Go Big or Go Home (Authentise Weekly News-In-Review – Week 16)

AM has matured into a fully fledged industrial manufacturing technology. As its materials, processes and applications broaden the jump to full-scale implementation is getting more and more a feasible possibility. The potential to disrupt various industries is being recognized by nations all over the globe: South Korea is one such nation at the forefront of innovation and it has decided to invest 41.2 billion won (Approx. $37 million USD) to foster the development of AM as a key innovation technology. Adidas, on the other hand, seems ready to tackle the stagnating idea that 3D printing is “all hype”. It announced that its concept shoe Futurecraft 4D is ready to be mass-produced as early as 2018, proof that the technology is more than capable to sustain its reputation as a manufacturing game-changer. This is surely shaping up to be the year of the “Go Big or Go Home” mantra, for AM and other important trends. For example in IIoT, where  Ubicquia wants to apply its concept on a city-scale.

South Korea to develop nation’s 3D printing industry with investment of over 41 billion won

Central district district of South Korea's capital city Seoul, viewed from Mt. Namsan. Photo by zuk0 on Flickr

The Ministry of Science, ICT and Future Planning in South Korea has announced it will be spending 41.2 billion won (Approx. $37 million USD) of 2017’s annual budget to encourage the development of 3D printing across the nation. Kang Seong-joo, an official from the ministry, says: “The 3D printing industry is the core technology that will bring about innovation in the manufacturing realm and create a new market by changing the paradigm of the industry. It is important for ministries to cooperate to actively deal with the fast-changing global trend.”

Read more here.

Adidas Futurecraft 4D starts a new era of 3D-printed shoes

Capture

Adidas is back with another sneaker based on a 3D-printed midsole, but this time the company says it’s moving even closer to mass production. The Futurecraft 4D shoe will be the first one using Carbon‘s “Digital Light Synthesis” process. The Silicon Valley company’s tech creates 3D items by blasting liquid with light, which Adidas says will allow it to operate on “a completely different manufacturing scale.” […] its plan to scale up projects more than 100,000 pairs made with the Digital Light Synthesis method by the end of 2018.

Read the full article at Engadget.

Revolutionizing the IIoT Industry One Streetlight at a Time

Sao Paulo industrial IoT Kairo Ubicquia

When Zimmerman [co-founder and chief technology officer of Ubicquia, an Industrial Internet of Things (IIoT) provider] recognized that a light pole could potentially solve all three of those challenges [power, networking and cost], the idea for Kairo began to take form. Over several months, Ubicquia designed and built a wide range of microcontroller boards featuring a variety of sensors and actuators that could be housed in a form factor no larger than a soda can. Kairo empowered sensor and application data to be harnessed by myriad of smart-city applications, delivering improved operations and planning, as well as better decision-making by city government.

Read all about Kairo at Spectrum.

 

Check out our Twitter feed to get more interesting news that weren’t featured here in our selection!

Evolving Scene of Metal AM (Authentise Weekly News-In-Review – Week 15)

This week was chock-full of news related to metal AM. The global scene is intensely researching the potential of metal AM and competitiveness is growing in all its aspects: metal powder production, CAD optimization, manufacturing method and much more. This week we saw exposed not one, but two new methods of metal AM! LLNL and the University of Sheffield both came out with novel techniques to produce produce metal objects additively and they both have their own unique benefits, being that increased speed or greater reliability. All the while we are making strides in understanding the complex physics involved in metal sintering processes: greater knowledge and improved optimization software is also crucial to manufacture metal parts reliably and efficiently.

 

Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory announces new metal 3D printing method

US federal research facility, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) has announced the results of an ongoing three-year research project into direct metal 3D printing. The technology, referred to as ‘Direct Metal Writing’ (DMW) adds to existing metal additive solutions such as selective laser melting (SLM). […] The new approach uses semi-solid metal feed material, beginning with a heated ingot or small block of metal. Once heated to a semi-solid state, the metal is then pushed through the extruder in a paste-like consistency. The material is shear thinning, which means it forms as a solid when left to rest and acts more like a viscous liquid when in motion or when applied with force.

Read more about DMW here.

Significant Speed Up For 3D Metal Printing Developed

Researchers at the University of Sheffield have developed a unique 3D metal printing process that could dramatically speed up metal printing. […] they call “Diode Area Melting”, or “DAM”. Instead of a single (or small number of) lasers, the DAM approach involves using an array of low power laser diode emitters. These emitters are not directed to the powder by an arrangement of mirrors, but instead are positioned above the powder surface and apply their energy directly.

Read more about DAM right here.

Challenges in modeling and simulation for metal additive manufacturing

Commercial acceptance of AM for exacting applications still faces a technical challenge caused by the limited understanding of physical phenomena in the melt pool. Real-time observation of this physical phenomena is difficult since AM melt pools are inherently transient and involve complex physical interactions between energy beam-powder substrate. Moreover, the real-time measurements of thermal and fluid variables can typically be made only on the surface of the melt pool. In contrast, a numerical simulation of mass, momentum, and energy transfer in melt pools can provide approximation of the melt pool shape and some useful 3D fields such as the distributions of temperature, flow velocities, solidification temperature gradient and solidification rate. Ultimately, an understanding of the relationships between processing, structure, properties and performance is essential.

Check out both parts of the article, here and here.

 

There is more where all these came from so don’t forget to follow us on Twitter for daily doses of AM news! And, as always, we hope to see you back next week!

Engineering Bespoke AM Materials (Authentise Weekly News-In-Review – Week 13)

This week we analyze how AM is broadening its own range of materials through innovative research and contributing to material research outside its own realm.

AM is greatly diversifying the choice of materials at its disposal, through material engineering or process improvements. New, super-stretchy polymers from SUTD promise a host of applications in flexible electronics and soft robots while a new microdroplets process from WSU allows for the manufacturing of structures with custom porosity and other properties. All the while, AM is the enabler of new bacteria processed, graphene-like materials.

As you can see, we’ve got a lot to cover!

New Elastomers Stretch 1100% for 3D Printing

Elastomers Stretch 1100% for 3D Printing

Researchers have developed a family of elastomers that they believe are the most elastic to date [up to 1100%] and can be fabricated using 3D-printing technologies, making these useful materials more accessible for a range of applications from soft robots to flexible electronics. “The new elastomers enable us to directly print complicated geometric structures and devices–such as a 3D soft robotic gripper–within an hour,” said Qi Ge, an assistant professor at the SUTD’s DManD Centre, and a co-leader of the project.

Read more here.

Nanostructure 3D printing mimics bio-materials

[…] researchers from Washington State University (WSU) have developed a method which can print metal structures with complex 3D architectures, controlling details down to the nanoscale and closely mimicking the architecture of natural bio-materials like wood and bone. This technique is likely to find other applications in batteries, supercapacitors and biological scaffolds.

Read more about it at Cosmos Magazine.

3D-printed bacteria could make bespoke graphene-like materials

Wonder material: graphene

How do you make a bespoke material with graphene-like properties? By putting bacteria to work using a 3D printer. Such bacteria could create brand new materials. For example, if you could use bacteria to print a substance resembling graphene – the 2D material made of single-atom layers of carbon – the end product might have similar desirable properties.

Read more at New Scientist.

 

We were at AMUG this week, holding a roundtable on AM process management challenges and solutions. We are grateful for the opportunity to share ideas with so many interesting people!

 

Don’t forget to follow us on Twitter and to come back next week for another weekly edition of the News-In-Review!

Security & Systematic issues in wake of IIoT (Authentise Weekly News-In-Review – Week 12)

Hello to our dear readers, welcome to the latest edition of News-In-Review!

IIoT is a term dense of meanings and implications. A lot of businesses see in its wake the possibility of unprecedented ROIs and some are already putting down the foundations to implement it in their proceedings. However, before obtaining the many benefits of data analytics, the proper system has to be put in place. One that needs to improve upon a pre-existing industrial network, fixing it’s outdated vulnerabilities, without the need for a complete overhaul. One that is able to withstand a growing risk of DDOS attacks from a growing number of sources thanks to the sensors riddled world we are constructing. And lastly, but not least, one that can assure quality processes and control of every step of the process chain.

If this is a topic you’re interested in, and want to dig in further, our CEO and CTO have written a chapter for Springer’s new “Cyberphysical Security for Industry 4.0” – due May 10.

Here’s this week news:

Forgotten factors that could take down IIoT

When it comes to IoT adoption in the industrial space, I’ve often found that operators worry about how they’re going to run before they can even walk. What this means is industrial operators let certain barriers to entry — primarily security and availability — keep them from even starting on their path to IIoT. In reality, there are certain key steps that industrial companies need to take well before they even attempt that transition.

Read more about these steps here.

Security Professionals Expect More Attacks On IIoT in 2017

Screen Shot 2017-03-18 at 12.28.16 AM

As technology vendors race to create more and more devices connected to the Internet of Things (IoT) the opportunity for hackers to get into these devices grows larger and larger, as these IoT devices are usually made with little to no regard for security. The fears of a large-scale attack waiting to happen were solidified this week when security firm Tripwire released the results of a study it performed about the rise of industrial IoT deployment in organizations, and to what extent it is expected to cause security problems in 2017.

Read the article and study at Onthewire.

Control is the key factor for implementing additive manufacturing in industry

According to the UK’s Manufacturing Technology Centre (MTC), control is the key factor for the implementation of additive manufacturing in an industrial setting. Speaking at today’s Additive World conference […] the MTC’s David Wimpenny explains the most important obstacles additive manufacturing needs to address. They created the National Centre for Additive Manufacturing two years ago, as a visualization of how they expect an additive manufacturing ‘factory of the future’ would look. However, Wimpenny is keen to stress it is not about the number of parts produced in the factory, but about control of the processes. Control of the quality and control of the data is the most important consideration for Wimpenny. As he says, “In a process chain, whatever you don’t control will be a problem”.

Read more here.

 

Don’t forget to follow us on Twitter and to come back in a week time to get a new glimpse at the future of AM, IIoT and all things in between!