Where are our 3D printed homes? Progress within the building industry (Authentise Weekly News-In-Review – #104)

It seems that after the initial outpour of hype for the construction building to adopt 3D printing in pretty much every application, the buzz has died down. We got so excited by the MX3D bridge in Amsterdam and the impressive print times of the homes by WinSun or ApisCor. Where’s our building industry boom? In truth, much of this sector still needs much R&D to be of widespread use: material sciences for printable and reliable cement, building design for printability, construction-grounds automation, even simple order-of-operations. But progress is happening that makes us hopeful. For one, the industry is seeing new players enter the fray, with a Long Island startup boasting to print a house in just 30h. Internationally, we see more projects coming to a close, with China inaugurating a new 3D printed bridge. Permits are being granted and laws are being brought up to speed for new buildings to finally start rolling out, which might make the dream closer than one might think.

Can this startup 3D-print a home in 30 hours?

A group of friends on the south shore of Long Island, New York, working under the name S-Squared, think they can revolutionize the way that homes are built, using a self-made 3D printing rig that they claim can lay down a home in a little more than 30 hours. The promised sale price—under $200,000, due to the reduction in manpower and labor costs—would be a game-changer for an expensive market such as Long Island. It would also be a new entry into the wide field of firms seeking to perfect and commercialize the process of mass-producing homes using 3D printing.

“This will be the first time a real house is going to be built with 3D printing,” says Bob Smith, an S-Squared co-founder. “Everyone else has put up sheds.”

Read the full story at Curbed.

China’s first 3D-printed footbridge opens in Shanghai

bridge

The span, which opened for business on Friday, was created by Shanghai Machinery Construction Group using materials made by Polymaker, the state-run China News Service reported. On its website, the Shanghai government described the new bridge as an “innovative way to promote 3D printing technology and popularise it in urban construction”.

“It’s both an everyday, practical application and an interactive one that involves people touching and even relying upon … a 3D printed thing,” Polymaker said on its website.

Keep reading here.

Sunconomy To Develop 3D Printed Concrete Homes


Sunconomy, a U.S. construction company, has received permits to build its first 3D printed geopolymer additively manufactured house in Lago Vista, Texas. These homes will include three bedrooms, and two bathrooms with a detached garage, solar, wind, battery backup, and a rainwater catchment system, at an estimated cost of $289,000.

Larry Haines, the founder of Sunconomy, stated, “We will be able to build the structure for a single family house in a day with virtually no waste, and built super strong and providing very low utility costs. Now that’s Sustainable!”

Read more here.

 

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How is 3D printing revolutionising healthcare? Customization (Authentise Weekly News-In-Review – #103)

Fresh from the holidays and a weekly break we took a deeper dive into the healthcare sector: The disruption is coming in heavy to the sector, not least from 3D printing. The most interesting feature that AM technologies bring to the table is customization and this manifests itself in many forms. The most renowned and established one is the manufacture of implants and guides that are based on CT scans and patient-specific physiology. Now that’s being broadened by even more tailored healthcare solutions such as pills and 3D printed drugs that can contain personalized treatments or even sensors to keep conditions monitored. Much of this wave of customization is being bolstered by a greater range of data that is obtainable by the healthcare sector, through consumer-grade devices or even apps. The digitization of our health is not only giving us new perspectives into our conditions but also opening new paths for the medical industry to reinvent its treatments.

Authentise recently partnered with leading additive “medifacturing” lab, PrinterPrezz, to drive the industry forward even further. Want to find out more about additive and healthcare: check out our friends at 3DHeals.com

Neutrogena To Launch Personalised 3D Printed Face Masks

The MaskiD app. Photo via Neutrogena.
Neutrogena, the American skincare brand of the multinational healthcare company, Johnson & Johnson, has introduced its customizable 3D printed face mask. Known as the MaskiD, this beauty venture uses photographs from a smartphone to micro 3D print a face mask suited to the consumer’s skin type and desired treatment. Speaking to Condé Nast beauty publication allure Michael Southall, research director and global lead of beauty tech at Neutrogena explained:

“The key with 3D printing is [that] we can put the active [ingredient] you want just where you need it, anywhere on the mask, as opposed to one product that you’re trying to use all over the face.”

Read the full article here.

 

Are 3D printed ingestible capsules the future of drug delivery?

 

3D printed ingestible capsule

[…] MIT, Draper and Brigham and Women’s Hospital, have collectively developed a 3D printed ingestible capsule capable of personalized drug delivery and much more. The small 3D printed capsule is designed to be swallowed by the patient and then to remain in the stomach for up to a month, where it can not only deliver drugs following a programmed schedule, but can also transmit information to the user’s smartphone and detect certain situations, such as infections and allergic reactions. The innovative device could be particularly useful for treating diseases or conditions where drugs are required over a long period of time.

Read the rest here.

Anatomiz3D Partners with Incredible AM to Deliver 3D Printed Patient-Specific Healthcare Solutions

 

Now, [Anatomiz3D] has announced that it’s partnering up with another Indian company [Incredible AM] to develop various 3D printed specialty solutions for the personalized healthcare industry. With Incredible AM Pvt Ltd’s capabilities in metal 3D printing, paired with the design and plastic 3D printing skills provided by Anatomiz3D, this new partnership is essentially a one-stop-shop when it comes to personalized, patient-specific healthcare solutions.

Read the rest here.

 

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Small scale printing poised to make a big impact (Authentise Weekly News-In-Review – Week 102)

3D printing is usually making the news for big plane components or successful rocket tests. Unsurprisingly, there’s a world of small applications in which the technology can, and is, making an impact. Typical subtractive methodologies are pretty limited at the micro level: 3D printing brings customization and extremely high-precision to labs all over the world. Micro-scale printing is on the table mainly thanks to advancements in material sciences, with polymerization and astonishing “implosion fabrication” techniques. Still, it never hurts to have a hand from biological agents who can do the job for you and when it comes to bio-printing, it’s the way to go to obtain functional, “living” materials.

Microlight3D Offers a New Kind of Microscale 3D Printing

For 15 years, Patrice Baldeck and Michel Bouriau led intense research and development at the Université Grenoble Alpes. They were working on a two-photon polymerization 3D printing process that would become the basis of Microlight3D, founded in 2016. The process would be the first-ever non-additive two-photon polymerization direct laser writing technology. The benefits of the technology are many. It produces extremely high resolution and smooth surface finish comparable to injection molding. It also offers a great deal of design flexibility and eliminates the need for post-processing. It’s a fast technology that produces robust parts in any shape – 100 times smaller than a strand of hair.

Read the full article here.

New Shrinking 3D Printer

The idea behind the shrinking 3D printer is to print an object and then shrink it to the required size – a technique known as implosion fabrication. The most amazing part about this 3D printer is that it can be adapted to work with different materials like metals, quantum dots and even DNA. Additionally, complicated shapes like microscopic linked chains can be printed too. In multiple tests, the team found that they could shrink a structure by about 8000 times.

Read the rest at Forbes.

Creating Living Materials Using Bacteria and 3D Printing

In a paper entitled “Programmable and printable Bacillus subtilis biofilms as engineered living materials,” a team of researchers discusses how they used 3D printing to produce custom nanoscale biomaterials from the natural secretion of amyloid fibers from the bacteria Bacillus subtilis. The bacteria generate biofilms by secreting amyloid fibers via a tightly controlled cluster of genes called the tapA-sipW-tasA operon. The researchers were able to genetically modify the TasA protein and introduce functional chemical groups onto the TasA fibers excreted by the bacteria. This means that the bacterial films could be designed to act as functional living materials.

Read the full article here.

 

From the entire Authentise team, we wish you a very Merry Christmas!

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3D Printing is a Biomedical Dream (Authentise Weekly News-In-Review – Week 101)

When it comes to the biomedical industry, there are key features of 3D printing which make it an ideal candidate for pushing it further. For starters, the complete customizability of its products, which is critical for anatomically unique physiques. Secondly, the technology’s accessibility helps bring these applications to a wider population, surpassing more cost-prohibitive options that may yet be less accurate. And thirdly, its ability to decentralize manufacturing for medical tools and resources is enabling us to provide for those locations far from traditional manufacturing infrastructure, from warzones to even space.

 

3D printed biosensor shows promise for glucose monitoring

WSU glucose monitoring biosensor

Researchers from Washington State University have developed a 3D printed biosensor for monitoring glucose. The innovative research could offer diabetes patients a more accessible and effective means of keeping track of their glucose levels.

Read more at 3D Printing Media Network.

 

Predicting Leaky Heart Valves with 3D Printing

Predicting Leaky Heart Valves with 3D Printing

Researchers at the Wyss Institute for Biologically Inspired Engineering at Harvard University have created a novel 3D printing workflow that allows cardiologists to evaluate how different valve sizes will interact with each patient’s unique anatomy before the medical procedure is actually performed.

Read more here.

 

Organs grown in space: Russian scientists 3D-print mouse’s thyroid on ISS in world first

Organs grown in space: Russian scientists 3D-print mouse’s thyroid on ISS in world first

Medical research has taken a leap into the future as Russian scientists have managed to grow a mouse’s thyroid in zero gravity using a 3D bioprinter on the International Space Station (ISS). And human organs may be next in line. Invitro says that maturation of printed organs and tissues in zero gravity occurs much faster and more efficiently than on Earth.

Read more here.

 

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Digitizing the manufacturing infrastructure (Authentise Weekly News-In-Review – Week 100)

At Authentise, we are advocates of the idea that data is the new driving force of every industry. Through it, we are finding new ways to address our current limitations and replacing the physical with the digital. Flexibility is the keyword here. Technologies like AM enable us to do away with traditional warehouses and produce spare parts on-demand. This enables companies to save a great deal on maintenance costs, inventory upkeep, and material/production waste. CAD data can be stored throughout the product’s history and replacement parts can be printed even after the product has run its course. Digitizing the pipeline offers the chance to reinvent parts’ designs based on new generative optimizations. These are in turn based off of FEM analysis, which can improve the part’s performance while reducing its weight greatly. A few concerns are still being thought through: IP protection, part qualification and more, but its promise is already being realized.

Digital Inventory: How 3D Printing Lets Manufacturers Rely Less On Warehouses Of Stuff

Digital inventory” is a concept increasingly bandied about in supply chain management. More than a buzzword, the underlying principle is that rather than stock a physical warehouse with mass quantities of spare parts that may or may not be in demand at any given time, including parts for now-obsolete original products, design files for components can be stored digitally and made on demand.

Read the full article here.

FIT AG presents ‘Spare Parts on Demand’ additive manufacturing solution at Formnext

SPOD FIT AG

FIT AG has presented its ‘Spare Parts on Demand’ (SPOD) solution at Formnext which employs additive manufacturing to produce industrial replacement components. It has come about as companies continue to work towards implementing digital inventories which lean on additive manufacturing rather than storing parts is warehouses that have been produced by conventional means. The reason being to save on cost and time.

Read more here.

The Designer Changing The Way Aircraft Are Built

The use of massive computing power to conjure radical new designs automatically – a process known as generative design – is revolutionising the way human designers work, letting us build things we previously couldn’t have imagined. Instead of waiting for inspiration to hit, computers go looking. Handed a set of design constraints – such as making it lightweight, strong and low-cost – generative design software identifies and assesses hundreds or thousands of candidates that all fit the bill, before selecting the pick of the crop.

Read more here.

 

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Automation and the human dilemma (Authentise Weekly News-In-Review – Week 99)

Automation is a buzzword that’s more often than not associated with negative press. After all, it is eroding the job market for an increasing number of manual jobs. How is the human going to cope with a rising automated workplace? The picture doesn’t seem that straighforward though. The question in itself is in doubt when studies show that the shift is adding new jobs for the skilled workforce, alongside a rise in wages. Furthermore, automation is tackling those jobs that are repetitive, menial and reward-less. At the same time, we seem to not fully understand the scope of change that is about to hit us in the very near future and, in turn, are not prepared for it. Our society will need to adapt to new ways of getting things done. Data is king and AI systems will be unmatched. We humans must find a way to collaborate with this societal shift, bringing the best of what humans can do in a world dominated by robots.

Industrial robots increase wages for employees

Industrial robots increase wages for employees

In addition to increasing productivity, the introduction of industrial robots has increased wages for the employees. At the same time, industrial robots have also changed the labor market by increasing the number of job opportunities for highly skilled employees, while opportunities for low-skilled employees are declining.

Read more at Phys.org

Are We Mature Enough To Deal With The Dilemmas Of Automation?

We have no choice but to address the challenge of how our societies are going to evolve, how we are going to reinvent ourselves when we free ourselves from so many boring or demeaning tasks and which models are appropriate for a society in which the eight-hour (or longer) working day is as outdated as the manual labor our forefathers endured. The dilemmas of automation require a new way of thinking: the technology exists, the question is whether we have the vision to adopt it. In short, the problem isn’t technology per se, it’s about adapting our society to make the best use of it. And I’m not sure we have the maturity yet to do so.

Read the full article here.

Learn to love robots, automation and artificial intelligence

Innovation expert Charles Leadbeater says people should not be frightened by AI’s rise. For him, the danger of AI is that we’ll become more like second-rate robots. He believes education needs to produce first-rate humans, able to work with robots.

 

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Formnext showed us how the AM industry is maturing (Authentise Weekly News-In-Review – Week 98)

The Authentise team has been exhibiting at Formnext in Frankfurt this past week. We had a blast exchanging views on the AM world and better understanding the industry as a whole. In the times between meetings and booth chats, we had the chance to roam the halls and take a peek at what’s on the horizon. What’s been consistently shown is a maturity and wide-ranging offering of products and services. The AM industry is cementing its stance, partly thanks to proven applications and no lack of R&D investment. As we saw it, Formnext was a chance for progress, not groundbreaking. This is not to say that there wasn’t innovation to be found within its halls, on the contrary. But the players are now pushing for market permeation more than ever.

EOS TO PREMIERE MILLION-LASER POLYMER 3D PRINTING AT FORMNEXT 2018

Powder exposure on the LaserProFusion. Photo via EOS
Leading 3D printer manufacturer and service provider EOS, is to debut a new polymer 3D printing technology at Formnext 2018 in Frankfurt next week. This technology, which is reportedly capable of replacing “injection molding in many contexts,” will be presented alongside a demo of Richard Browning’s 3D printed jetpack, and the company’s new quad laser EOS M 300-4 metal system as a production cell. The new developments from the company are made to increase 3D printer outputs to an industrially-competitive scale, a key theme throughout the industry as we saw at last year’s Formnext, and a chief preoccupation for EOS and its partners.

Read the full article here.

FIT AG presents ‘Spare Parts on Demand’ additive manufacturing solution at Formnext

SPOD FIT AG

FIT AG has presented its ‘Spare Parts on Demand’ (SPOD) solution at Formnext which employs additive manufacturing to produce industrial replacement components. As most parts that need replacing have been made with traditional methods, they have often passed through an approval process, meaning it isn’t possible to create a 3D printed copy. Deutsche Bahn, a German railway company, encountered this problem when attempting to replace the left sandbox housing in a brake system. The component had been manufactured in cast grey iron, and so the part had to be redesigned and then printed in titanium using EBM. The printed part has so far passed on all tests performed. At Formnext, FIT AG has showcased SPOD as a way for this success to be achieved with more regularity.

Read more here.

Nanoscribe awarded €40K prize, showcases microscale printing at Formnext
Tess Boissonneault

nanoscribe microscale

Nanoscribe, a specialist in microscale additive manufacturing, was recently selected as the first place winner of the Baden-Württemberg State Prize for Young Companies. The award, worth €40,000, is bestowed upon companies that demonstrate economic success and make a sustainable contribution to society in some way. This week, Nanoscribe has been showcasing its technology at Formnext in Frankfurt. There, the company is exhibiting the fabrication of structures with micrometer precision in millimeter dimensions for the first time.

Read the full article here.

 

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Why AM Certifications are so difficult (Authentise Weekly News-In-Review – Week 97)

For AM to take a greater hold on the industries it’s poised to impact, there are certain angles to smooth out and one of those is certifications. Early adopters of additive production such as aerospace and medical are rightly picky about its certifications and the AM community is making sure to have its own record straight. Safety certifications are the highest priority in this regard and Lockheed Martin’s facility in Sunnyvale, California now holds the first UL certified in the world. Govt. bodies are also moving to help a wider audience to stay within standards, like Health Canada’s newest draft guidance on AM medical devices. However, the main reason why certifications are difficult is that AM is still not an exact science. With fast and multi-spectrum monitoring technologies, we are starting to see what happens during the process. However, certain aspects of the physics behind it are full of variables we don’t understand.

Lockheed Martin extends additive manufacturing to key spacecraft components

Lockheed Martin’s Additive Design and Manufacturing Center in Sunnyvale, California, where the company produces military, commercial and civil space technology, attained a comprehensive safety certification.

“We are the first UL certified additive manufacturing facility in the world,” Servando Cuellar, Lockheed Martin Space Systems engineering senior manager, told SpaceNews.

Read more here.

Health Canada Drafts Policies on 3D-Printed Implantable Devices

Health Canada Drafts Policies on 3D-Printed Implantable Devices

 

 

 

 

Health Canada released draft guidance Thursday to aid manufacturers in preparing license applications for implantable medical devices produced by additive manufacturing or 3D-printing. The guidance “represents the first phase of 3D-printing policy in Canada” because Health Canada intends to continuously adapt its policies to emerging issues on the topic “due to the fast-changing technological environment,” the regulator said.

Read the full article here.

High-Speed Cameras Used to Monitor 3D Printing Process

3D printing, particularly laser-powder bed fusion or L-PBF, requires a great deal of monitoring to avoid defects and flaws in the final parts. In a thesis entitled “Process Monitoring for Temporal-Spatial Modeling of Laser Powder Bed Fusion,” a student named Animek Shaurya studies the use of high-speed video cameras for in-situ monitoring of the 3D printing process of nickel alloy 625 to detect meltpool, splatter, and over melting regions to improve the quality of the print.

Read more here.

We’ll be at Formnext in Frankfurt from the 13th to 16th November. Come see us at booth #B30J.

Follow us on Twitter to keep updated on AM & IIoT related news as well as updates to Authentise’s services!

How pioneer projects have laid the foundation for the true AM revolution (Authentise Weekly News-In-Review – Week 96)

In the beginning of the AM craze, everyone thought that the future of manufacturing was right around the corner. Once the storm had subsided and everyone was back to reality, most of the projects that had sparked at that moment were gone, but some endured. What was the difference between those which never made it past the news and those that are now solid industrial realities? For Nike, it was a matter of testing the market’s appetite and iterate on a product (and a production line) that worked. Its new line of 3D printed shoes is the heir of a project that’s year in the making and is eyeing mass production only after making sure that the path was true. Others saw in AM an opportunity to disrupt the established manufacturing infrastructure, and gradually implemented a new system, tried and tested to now enable to approach things differently. GE is one such case, one of the first to adopt AM and now it boasts one of the most extensive portfolios of applications in the field. However, sometimes a project needs the right fertile ground of established research to start growing. As NASA and Lockheed Martin constantly bring new aerospace parts to the testing grounds, proving the liability of AM in such a high-stake industry, new companies like Relativity Space hope to push the endeavor even further, by printing entire rockets. We are very grateful to those entrepreneurs who had the courage to jump into uncertainty, some to success some to failure, and make the world of AM what it is today.

Nike’s 3D Printed Elite Shoe Preparing For A Wider Release

The Zoom VaporFly Elite Flyprint 3D. Image via Nike
Nike’s 3D printed shoe Zoom VaporFly Elite Flyprint 3D will soon get a wider release. The Flyprint 3D is the updated version of the famous 3D printed Nike Zoom Vaporfly 4%, designed with the help of Eliud Kipchoge, winner Berlin marathon 2018. The Beaverton-based footwear giant has worked to perfect the Vaporfly 4% since last year. For this purpose, the company once again recruited the help of Kipchoge. The Zoom Vaporfly is called “4%” because an independent research found that Vaporfly wearing runners can gain 4% of the lead time on their competitors.

Read the full article here.

GE Transportation To Introduce 250 3D Printed Locomotive Parts By 2025

According to reports in UK rail industry authority the Railway Gazette GE is looking to apply additive manufacturing to components for its locomotives. If all goes according to plan, this could mean that in the next seven years GE Transportation will have an inventory of up to 250 3D printed train components. A pilot initiative for 3D printing at GE Transport is underway as part of its Brilliant Factory model, combined with analytics and lean manufacturing in a Digital Thread.

Read more here.

Relativity Space’s Quest To 3D Print Entire Rockets

Even NASA has been dipping their proverbial toe in the additive manufacturing waters, testing printed parts for the Space Launch System’s RS-25 engine. It would be safe to say that from this point forward, most of our exploits off of the planet’s surface will involve additive manufacturing in some capacity. But one of the latest players to enter the commercial spaceflight industry, Relativity Space, thinks we can take the concept even farther. Not content to just 3D print rocket components, founders Tim Ellis and Jordan Noone believe the entire rocket can be printed. Minus electrical components and a few parts which operate in extremely high stress environments such as inside the pump turbines, Relativity Space claims up to 95% of their rocket could eventually be produced with additive manufacturing.

Read the full article here.

 

We’ll be at Formnext in Frankfurt from the 13th to 16th November. Come see us at booth #B30J.

Follow us on Twitter to keep updated on AM & IIoT related news as well as updates to Authentise’s services!

How being open helps you and the AM community (Authentise Weekly News-In-Review – Week 95)

For some people, “Open” has plainly negative connectations. What open really means is for everyone to weave and participate in an environment that enables learning, interoperability and ultimately makes very much business sense – as we saw in Red Hat’s $33bn acquisition. The maker revolution started as a way to put 3D printing and other technologies in the hands of everyone, democratizing manufacturing and bring about a new wave of STEM pupils. FDM printers were the first but now all sorts of printing platforms are going open. In fact, being open enables businesses to embrace third party opportunities more readily and easily and ultimately brings greater value to the customer. We recently announced the support for the quoting capabilities of Prosper3D within our own platform, something that our customers can keep in mind when creating the best platform for their case. We need to share more of the cool work we do, otherwise most will never see the light of day. We have just closed a crowd-sourcing experiment with Fabbaloo inviting anyone to submit their best 3D printing application, and the most voted got featured in our playing cards deck! The community has so much to give.

The Oasis 3DP Brings Open Source Binder Jetting to Makers

The 2018 Hackaday Prize will soon be wrapping up, and as always, the contest has yielded some wonderfully innovative and promising ideas. One entry, submitted by Yvo de Haas, aims to make binder jetting accessible to everyone. Binder jetting, in which a liquid binding agent is deposited to bind powder particles together, is an effective method of 3D printing whose benefits include not requiring supports. It’s not a technology, however, that is typically accessible to the average maker.

Read more about it here.

A New Milestone for Open Additive Manufacturing Platforms

Authentise Logo

Authentise, the leader in data-driven workflow tools for additive manufacturing, today announced a new partnership with Prosper3D, the provider of accurate quoting solutions for AM service bureaus, to give Authentise customers an even greater choice in tools to manage their workflow. As part of the agreement, Authentise customers will be able to access the Prosper3D quoting engines seamlessly through the Authentise Additive Accelerator interface.

Read the full press release here.

Highlighting The Best 3D Printing Applications

 [Image: BlueWLabs]

Karen Linder shared with us this wonderful application of 3D printed designs that work in combination with engineered material properties. By restoring natural oyster habitats the environment will benefit from biological filtration systems, wave barriers and natural nurseries for fish and other marine life. Presently, 85% of the world’s oyster reefs are functionally extinct. The material employed is plastic-free and is optimized for better larval settlement, survival and growth. Karen’s entry has been voted as the best application on the round and will be included as a new card in the latest update to our playing cards deck.

Read more about it here.

 

We’ll be at Formnext in Frankfurt from the 13th to 16th November. Come see us at booth #B30J.

Follow us on Twitter to keep updated on AM & IIoT related news as well as updates to Authentise’s services!