Safety and reliability of metal AM parts (Authentise Weekly News-In-Review – Week 60)

3D printed metal parts are already being employed in very real world situations, from aircraft engine parts to wind turbines. In order to be applicable for these high stress scenarios, metal parts need to comply with very stringent performance standards. 3D printed brakes have been deemed suitable for a Bugatti Chiron, the most powerful super car in the company’s history. You can bet they’ve made their homework prior to putting their whole line of $3M cars on the line. Hydraulic parts manufacturers are utilizing AM to produce components faster and more efficiently than ever before, capable maintaining peak performance in highly pressurized applications. The research is still ongoing, especially in the material sciences. Scientists at the University of Kassel have been able to use AM with a particularly strong steel alloy, which will greatly enhance the safety and reliability of metal parts.

SLM Solutions Metal 3D Printing Brakes The Most Powerful Car In Bugatti History

Bugatti's

[…] 3D printing is implemented for next generation development of the Bugatti Chiron – a car with a price tag close to $3 million. Measuring 41 cm x 21 cm x 13.6 cm (L x W x H) the part claims, by volume, to be “the largest functional component” 3D printed out of titanium. It is also 2 kg lighter than its 4.9 kg machined aluminum counterpart.

“Technically, this is an extremely impressive brake caliper, and it also looks great.” – Frank Götzke, Head of New Technologies in Technical Development at Bugatti Automobiles S.A.S.

Read the full story here.

Aidro Uses Metal 3D Printing to Improve Hydraulic Components

Aidro was founded in 1982 by hydraulics engineer Paolo Tirelli. Today, they use metal 3D printing for making custom designs with complex geometries, lightweight parts, and rapid prototyping.

“With good design methods, we can 3D print a hydraulic manifold that can withstand pressure peaks in the system without any problems,” says Alberto Tacconelli, Managing Director. “We can increase the wall thickness and change the shapes of the channels where the FEM analysis indicates a potential failure.”

Read about in-depth examples at 3DPrint.

EBM 3D Printing Process Used to Process a Steel Alloy with High Damage Tolerance

For the first time, a research team at the University of Kassel in Germany has used additive manufacturing to process a steel alloy with extremely high damage tolerance, which will help in promoting safety and reliability of 3D printed metal parts. […] This type of alloy, thanks to its special deformation mechanisms, holds up very well, and the heat from the EBM process helps to avoid any unpredictable material properties, resulting in a significantly better inner material structure that protects against possible damage.

Read more about it here.

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Metal printing, the coming production phase (Authentise Weekly News-In-Review – Week 58)

Scalability of 3D printing in an industrial context requires a few hurdles to overcome, one of the foremost being printing speeds. Most current generation metal printers have printing times that can’t compete with common injection molding or CNC products, not to mention the time required for post-processing and more. Initially, the metal printing industry was focusing on different features to drive the growth of the sector, specifically material choice, precision and reliability. Now, companies like Seurat Technologies, Velo3D and Spee3D are poised to satisfy the demand to put 3D printers in the factory floor for good. As with FDM tech, SLS patents are expiring and opening the dam for new companies to be born. It’s only a matter of time before 3D printing is going to be competitive from a time standpoint with other traditional manufacturing technologies.

Is Velo3D secretly working to revolutionize 3D metal printing for robotics?

As you might recall, plastic 3D printing really took off back in 2009 when a key patent on deposition technology expired, opening the way for 3D printing technology to significantly drop in price. Metal 3D printing, by and large, relies on the far more expensive selective laser sintering technology, for which the patent expired in 2014. This was, as Silicon Valley expert Tekla Perry reminds the world, just before Velo3D was founded. All metal 3D printing experts, however, believe that the metal breakthrough is to come from the material side (rather than the SLS side), and Perry suggests that Velo3D could be working on that breakthrough.

Find out more about Velo3D here.

Seurat Technologies raises $13.5M to accelerate game-changing metal 3D printing technology

Seurat Technologies, a Silicon Valley-based startup, announces it has raised $13.5 million in a Series A funding round. The significant investment will reportedly be put towards funding and accelerating the company’s much-hyped metal additive manufacturing technology.

Read more about it here.

SPEE3D announces global launch of ‘Supersonic Metal 3D Printing’

SPEE3D, Melbourne, Australia, has announced the company’s official global launch and availability of its industrial metal Additive Manufacturing systems. Designed for scalable, just in time production, SPEE3D is said to be the world’s first metal 3D printer leveraging supersonic 3D deposition (SP3D) technology to deliver manufacturing grade printing at production speeds.

Rather than using heat to melt metal powders, SPEE3D’s patented technology uses supersonic deposition in which a rocket nozzle accelerates air up to three times the speed of sound to deliver manufacturing grade metal and high-density parts.

Read more about it here.

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Manufacturing agility: on-demand printing through AM (Authentise Weekly News-In-Review – Week 57)

The manufacturing model that has characterized the last two centuries was one of irrepressible rush to satisfy the demands of the market. Factories constantly spewed products and parts, even when all orders were satisfied, trusting on times when these might be requested again. Needless to say, this model is very wasteful and contains surplus expenses for stocking and unneeded manufacturing, the infamous “bullwhip effect”, that partake in a feeling of gambling on the market’s ups and downs. Both customers and companies are left unsatisfied. Zara, which makes 50% of its inventory close to the point of use, only sells 10% of its inventory at a discount. Its competitors, 30%.

Additive manufacturing provides the means for a more agile manufacturing framework, one that is capable of flexibly addressing new, and sudden, needs without falling back on warehouse stock. The concept can be applied to every industry on the planet: pharma companies can 3D print drugs on the fly and locally to address an urgent outbreak, constructions can be tailored to local requirements without shipping prefabs. To realize the potential of AM in addressing these demands, the pipeline must be enabled by software capable to provide a holistic overview of operations to nimbly set about whatever request it might face. That’s what we’re focused on at Authentise. Talk to us if you want to know more.

New ‘Reactionware’ 3D Printing System Spits Out Pharmaceuticals On-Demand

Philip Kitson and colleagues at the University of Glasgow have developed a new framework for 3D printing drug manufacturing devices on-site on an as-needed basis. All it requires is a $2,000 3D printer and a drug specification (the manufacturing processes required to produce it). Given such a specification, software created by Kitson’s group dictates to the printer exactly what sort of manufacturing hardware it needs to print that is then capable of producing a particular drug.

Read the rest of the article on Motherboard.

World’s First 3D Printed Toilets Coming to India With Singapore’s Hamilton Labs

Hamilton Labs' 3D printed toilet design complete with energy genertaing solar panel roof. Image via Hamilton Labs

In a new agreement with India’s Center for Rural Information and Action (CRIA) Hamilton Labs will be providing a robot operated 3D printer to “build fast, beautiful and comfortable toilets,” for the Madhubani district in Bihar which sprawls Eastern and Northern India.

Read more about it here.

Mass Production – Is 3D Printing Up To The Supply-Chain Challenge?

Custom designs of 3D printable model cups, from One Coffee Cup a Day | 30 days, 30 cups challenge by Bernat Cuni of Cunicode Design Studio

The Bullwhip Effect describes a phenomenon in which manufacturers build a huge inventory of products based on a forecast of customer demand. From the assumed position high on the supply chain, a manufacturer can misinterpret consumer purchasing behavior at retail level – resulting in a mass of unsaleable stock. Mass customization, i.e. making products to exact customer specifications, low-labor demands and product consolidation, gives 3D printing the potential to break free of the Bullwhip Effect, therefore leading to the question:

“If the Bullwhip Effect is a critical problem in any supply chain, would 3D printing be a solution?”

Read the full article here.

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The Scalability of IIoT Systems (Authentise Weekly News-In-Review – Week 56)

The IIoT is an acronym that’s being touted around industrial settings for years now. As it stands for Industrial Internet of Things, its goal is similar to what common household IoT devices try to achieve: smart control and monitoring of operations, at any scale and complexity. Approaching the subject can look daunting and many companies think the technical effort is out of reach without any practical benefit. That’s because we’re not making benefits clear enough to the operators. Our current deployments are expensive one-off customs and those that go beyond that are often simple dashboards or at best predicitive maintenance tools – both deliver none or very little ROI by themselves.

While we’re trying to build scalable process efficiency systems using IIOT data at Authentise the key steps to make IIoT really scalable are flexible platforms that can process all kinds of data for different outcomes and are very easy for untrained operators to program. The devices required to obtain, elaborate data and to generate insights are now very cheap and the market is sprouting solutions tailored to every occasion. Now the software interfaces needed to manage the system need to becoming friendlier, cheaper or even open source, enabling the full spectrum of applications to talk to each other frictionlessly. All of this makes for a framework that can scale from a single piping temperature sensor to the entire production pipeline. It’s been reported that 86% of industrial orgs are already adopting IIoT solutions, and it doesn’t pertain only to big corporations. Breweries can leverage data from their distilling operation just as much as Lockheed Martin does from its F-35 factory floor. While we only currently unlock 5% of available data, it’s easy to see the promise going forward.

Shipyard 4.0 Concept Features 3D Printing, Digital Twins, Advanced Technologies for Shipbuilding in Spain and Australia

In order to reduce business costs and increase productivity in line with Industry 4.0, Navantia has implemented the Shipyard 4.0 model, which will apply and optimize these technologies for applications in shipbuilding. The model has been implemented in Navantia Spain’s Ferrol shipyard in order to build next-generation F110 frigates for the Spanish Navy […] The Shipyard 4.0 model will enhance the outcomes of Navantia Australia’s SEA 5000 and Continuous Build Program by helping to develop a sustainable shipbuilding industry for the Navy, creating a new skilled workforce and modern facilities for both the shipyard and the supply chain, and setting up a modern ICT infrastructure that will support the digital twin (ship zero) of the shipyard, as well as for the ship.

Read more about Navantia Shipyard 4.0 here.

New study reveals rise of IIoT adoption in manufacturing

According to the 2017 study [by Bsquare], 86% of industrial organizations are currently adopting IoT solutions and 84% believe those solutions are very or extremely effective. In addition, 95% believe that IoT has a significant or tremendous impact on their industry. However, the study also shows that most IIoT investments are focused on connectivity (78%) and data visualization (83%). In addition, only 48% are doing advanced analytics on that data and only a small number (28%) are automating the application of insights derived from analytics.

Read more stats at Modern Materials Handling.

Breweries Tapping the IIoT to Produce Your Favorite Brew

By creating that virtual environment and installing IIoT sensors throughout the production and packaging environments, breweries that have adopted advanced analytics to process the collected data can help predict equipment lag or failure before they disrupt production. At the very least, the sensors can help to provide critical insights to identify the root of the problem to minimize downtime.

Read the full article here.

 

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Reinventing the Mundane: rediscovering potential through AM (Authentise Weekly News-In-Review – Week 55)

AM is giving us the capabilities to drastically improve the performance of many of the parts and systems around us. This is because of its much greater design freedom, material choice, density control and other features that make AM a manufacturing game-changer. With this tool in our hands, we can really start to think taking mundane objects to the next level. Developing these applications shows where AM needs to improve to start making a dent. For example, special certifications need to be worked for it to be safely implemented pervasively. Currently there aren’t even 50 standards for the whole range of additive manufacturing materials. Even traditional glass blowing has over 100. The potential is there not only to get better performance out of every item, but to create a whole range of entirely smarter, more environmentally friendly products unthinkable in the past: Nuclear spare parts, efficient heat exchangers and wireless communication without electronics, to name but a few.

Westinghouse Looks to Advance 3D Printing in the Nuclear Industry

Now power company Westinghouse plans to be the first company to install a 3D printed fuel component in a commercial nuclear reactor.
Westinghouse is looking to lower the cost of replacement parts as well as to speed the qualification of 3D printed materials.

“These cost and lead time reduction estimates still look appropriate for certain replacement castings, using current cost estimates for AM casting moulds and the associated foundries/casting processes,” said Clint Armstrong, Advanced Manufacturing Expert at Westinghouse.

Read the full article here.

HiETA Uses Renishaw Metal 3D Printer to Take Heat Exchangers From Prototyping to Commercial Production

HiETA develops metal AM methods to produce lightweight, complex structures for heat-management applications, such as internal combustion engine components, turbo machinery, recuperators, and heat exchangers for fuel cells. The first successful 3D printed component was built in 17 days, which HiETA and Renishaw worked to bring down to eighty hours by optimizing the process parameters and improving both the software and hardware. According to tests, the component, which achieved 30% lower weight and volume, met the requirements for heat transfer and pressure drop.

Read more about it here.

3D Printing Wireless Connected Objects

University of Washington researchers have developed a way to 3D print plastic objects and sensors capable of communicating wirelessly with other smart devices, without the need for batteries or other electronics.

 

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How AM On-Demand Manufacturing Shifts Production… to Everywhere (Authentise Weekly News-In-Review – Week 53)

Additive manufacturing is taking part production and making it decentralized, capable of happening at every node of the global network. This is a transformational opportunity, making autonomous units able to attend to their needs, on-demand, upending a complex logistical headache that is the current manufacturing industry. Take for example a military ship, out at sea, with a crisis on their hands and no spare part to patch it. UCONN engineers are devising ways to implement AM capabilities on vessels so that they can have the agility to address the problem without making port. This can be the case for farming platforms or bomb defusing exercises. Crafting their own alternatives brings the problem to the people that are fully immersed in the field, who know what they need and what is lacking in current options. This is an interesting development, not to mention transportation/logistical transformation and IP sharing/securing issues. We still have a lot to figure out, but it’s exciting to be on this wave making it happen.

Full Speed Ahead: Using Additive Manufacturing to Repair Ships at Sea

Researchers Pamir Alpay, left, and Rainer Hebert, hold a sample of 3-D metal printing at UConn's Innovation Partnership Building. (Peter Morenus/UConn Photo)

A team of UConn engineers has now developed a way for a ship’s crew to pinpoint the exact location of any mechanical trouble on board and, instead of taking the ship offline for maintenance, to repair or replace the part while the ship is still at sea. They are also developing a field-deployable manufacturing process that could produce replacement parts from electronic files using a 3-D printer on board ship after the metal-ceramic parts indicate failure or problems.

Read the full article at UCONN Today.

3D Printing Saves Time and Money in Urban Farming Product Design and Prototyping

Brooklyn-based Farmshelf wants to make it easy for anyone to grow their own food, and has developed an autonomous system, complete with custom 3D printed parts, that makes it possible for individuals, restaurants, and residential communities to do so on-site.

Andrew Shearer, CEO and Co-Founder of Farmshelf, said, “As a company, you can now look at 3D printing as a way to involve more people in the building process, and involve more in the prototyping and dreaming process, thanks to how easy it is.”

Keep reading here.

3D Printing Provides Utah Law Enforcement With an Explosive Solution

Training at WMDTech. Photo via WMDTech.

A police department in the US has invested in a 3D printer and introduced 3D printer courses for its SWAT team and bomb squad. Sgt. Harold “Skip” Curtis, from Utah County Sheriff’s office, initially 3D printed parts for a detonation exercise with the help of explosives service and training bureau WMDTech. Following the success of this, the sheriff’s office has invested in an FFF 3D printer and a dedicated server for sharing designs, while WMDTech has introduced a pilot course to teach SWAT and bomb techs how to draw and print 3D objects.

Read the full article here.

We hope you’ve had a merry and relaxing Christmas and now, we wish you a happy new year!

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How AM can Boost Manufacturing Economies (Authentise Weekly News-In-Review – Week 52)

AM is one of the technologies that are contributing to economic growth of countries across the globe. The factors at play are many: research centers bring innovation and business opportunities, businesses offer new products and services based on considerable investments, and so on. A UK review has pinpointed AM as one of the technologies that will grow its manufacturing economy to £455B over the next decade. It’s no surprise that governments are keen to keep the ecosystem thriving under the best conditions possible. This comes into play in a variety of ways: huge funds are being made available to invest in AM-related activities, govt. funded regulations and standards are being drafted (like the FDA guidance on 3D printing of medical products) and defense agencies are incorporating AM within their innovation initiatives. The fertile soil for manufacturing innovation will reward every country with the farsight to make it happen.

 

Additive manufacturing to play key role in £455bn UK manufacturing potential

madesmarter.png

A government-commissioned review on industrial digitalisation in the UK, has pinpointed additive manufacturing (AM) as one of the major innovations that could catapult the UK manufacturing economy to £455 billion over the next decade. The ‘Made Smarter’ report, led by Juergen Maier, CEO of Siemens UK, identifies a number of Industrial Digital Technologies (IDTs) including robotics, virtual reality and Internet of Things, as key areas of opportunity for the UK to increase growth in the manufacturing sector. Bringing together expertise from over 200 small businesses, universities and organisations including Additive Manufacturing UK, the 246-page review suggests that the UK stands to benefit from an additional 175,000 jobs and between 1.5 and 3% growth per year by adopting these technologies.

Read the full article at TCT Mag.

Statement by FDA Commissioner Scott Gottlieb, M.D., on FDA ushering in new era of 3D printing of medical products; provides guidance to manufacturers of medical devices

Once considered a futuristic technology on the distant horizon, 3D printing of medical devices, medications and human tissue is quickly becoming a promising reality. Patients have already benefitted from 3D printed medical products through access to personalized devices and innovative drugs that have led to significant health improvements. But the FDA is now preparing for a significant wave of new technologies that are nearly certain to transform medical practice. We’re working to provide a more comprehensive regulatory pathway that keeps pace with those advances, and helps facilitate efficient access to safe and effective innovations that are based on these technologies.

Read the full statement on the FDA website.

 

Government and 3D Printing: A New Line of Innovation to Protect

After realizing the boost 3D printing could deliver to manufacturing, the U.S. government increased funding for institutions researching AM technologies. In 2012 the federally funded National Additive Manufacturing Innovation Institute (NAMII) was launched — a $30 million pilot institute aimed at boosting 3D printing’s use in manufacturing. Also referred to as America Makes, the institute works with brilliant minds from industry, academia, and government. It is expected that these collaborations will help reduce the period of development between a lab’s proof-of-concept and commercial product. With the U.S. government investing more in AM and 3D printing techniques, governmental organizations are now starting to integrate the technology into their own processes.

Keep reading here.

 

This being the last News In Review before the festivities, we at Authentise wanted to wish you all a Merry Christmas!

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Digitize the world! (Authentise Weekly News-In-Review – Week 51)

The factory of tomorrow is made of advanced manufacturing machinery, to be sure, but increasing attention is given to the digitizing scene of industrial operations, and rightly so. 3D printing is giving businesses the possibility to store countless CAD models digitally to be manufactured on-demand, without the need for bulky and costly warehouses. The VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland suggests that around 5% of all industrial parts could be digitized, an opportunity for all businesses to obtain a competitive advantage. One such example is that of the Dubai Roads and Transport Authority (RTA) which, partnered with Siemens, will keep its infrastructure running more efficiently and cost-effectively. Digitizing goes much deeper than databases: simulation and analytical technologies enable factories to get “digital twins” of their operations, enabling them to predict maintenance times and complete operational awareness.

VTT Suggests 5% Of All Spare Parts Could Be Digitally Stored For 3D Printing

VTT conducts research for both private and public sectors. Photo via VTT.

The VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland has completed research [that suggests] digitalization could create a “competitive advantage” for businesses. The reasons given include increased availability, cost savings, customisation and “part intelligence.” Around 5% of parts can currently be manufactured digitally, according to need, notes VTT project manager Sini Metsä-Kortelainen. “3D printing technology has reached the stage where high-quality manufacturing is possible.”

Read the full article here.

Siemens To Bring 3D Printed Parts to Dubai Metro

Tracks of the metro and the Dubai skyline. Photo via travel-cam.net

To keep trains running, and passengers happy, the city’s Roads and Transport Authority (RTA) has signed an MOU with the Middle Eastern branch of award-winning automation conglomerate Siemens. Speaking at the time of launch Abdul Mohsin Ibrahim Younes, CEO of RTA’s Rail Agency, explained, “The 3D printing technology would enable RTA to keep the Dubai metro assets in service longer while driving down the cost of parts and in turn passing this saving back to the customer.”

Read more about it here.

IIoT Platform Creates A Digital Twin of F-35 Manufacturing Facilities

Lockheed Martin Aeronautics has licensed Ubisense Smart Space for deployment at its F-35 program at Fort Worth, TX, to improve manufacturing efficiency with a digital twin. Delivering new levels of visibility and control, SmartSpace provides a foundation platform for manufacturers’ Industry 4.0 strategy. Creating a real-time digital twin of the production environment, Ubisense’s technology connects activities in the real world to manufacturing execution and planning systems, making real-world processes involving moving assets visible and measurable.

Read the full article here.

 

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Autonomous robots: its more than just driving (Authentise Weekly News-In-Review – Week 50)

When you say autonomous one most commonly thinks of self-driving cars. Nonetheless, the movement to make robots survey and act on their own precedes driving around no-hands. Autonomous robots have the ability to adapt to various scenarios within their scope of purpose and, as such, are being developed for a host of different applications. What is largely proceeding out of the spotlight is an ever-increasing presence within plants and other work environments of robots that are providing the tendrils for the factory-wide brain of the IIoT. These robots can sense their environment, be in constant and instantaneous exchange of information with central processing systems and execute complex directives, managing the necessary sub-steps on their own. Adidas has created a factory that uses autonomous robots to drive on-demand sneaker production. Menial tasks can be done effortlessly and efficiently by robots that, through machine vision, can see and analyze their targets and act according to their AI directives. This is why Château Clerc Milon, renowned wine producer, has implemented robots to take care of vineyards. Autonomous robots are perfect for scenarios in which unfaltering machine vision and pattern recognition enable them to see what the human eye wouldn’t catch. Like for rediscovering long-lost ’50s prototype jet fighters out in the ocean.

Inside Adidas’ Robot-Powered, On-Demand Sneaker Factory

Called Speedfactory, the facility would pair a small human workforce with technologies including 3-D printing, robotic arms, and computerized knitting to make running shoes—items that are more typically mass-produced by workers in far-off countries like China, Indonesia, and Vietnam.

“What we enable is speed,” said Gerd Manz, vice president of Adidas’ innovation group. “We can react to consumer needs within days.”

Read the full article at Wired.

Bordeaux: Robot vineyard worker impresses at Clerc Milon

robot vineyard worker

Château Clerc Milon, under the same ownership as Château Mouton Rothschild in Pauillac, has tested a prototype vineyard robot named ‘Ted’ to help with soil cultivation and weeding in its vines.

Baron Philippe de Rothschild’s MD, Philippe Dhalluin, said, ‘We see robotics as an effective solution for the future.

‘As well as helping to make our vineyard work less arduous and respecting the soil, it will reduce our dependency on fossil energies and the harm caused by traditional agricultural machinery.’

Read more here.

Autonomous sub finds long-lost supersonic aircraft from the 50s

The "Raise the Arrow" team gathers for a photo behind the AUV

Fraunhofer is reporting that one of its DEDAVEs [unmanned submersible] has located a couple of sunken flight models of a famous Canadian jet fighter, the Avro Arrow. Billed as “the world’s first autonomous underwater vehicle [AUV] to be developed from the outset with a view to series production,” the DEDAVE is designed to be easily manufactured on an assembly line, and thus relatively inexpensive to buy. At less than 700 kg it’s also quite light for an AUV and can travel autonomously for up to 20 hours on one charge of its eight batteries, diving to a maximum depth of 6,000 meters.

Read more about the discovery here.

 

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Automation: adapt or disrupt? (Authentise Weekly News-In-Review – Week 49)

Automation technologies are starting to take hold in many environments of our daily lives. It’s not just the factory floor, the whole world is getting permeated by tech that makes short work of menial tasks. But how is this changing the way we think about these spaces? The factories of the future are often envisioned as highly technical spaces, with every nook and cranny tailored to the task at hand, aimed at making it easiest for the robots in place to do their jobs. However, most advanced automation technologies at our disposal are capable of navigating complex environments, react according to outside stimuli and thus safely traverse almost any workspace they find themselves in. Cobots (collaborative robots), autonomous vehicles or even Amazon warehouse handling and dispatch robots are perfect examples of this. The interesting dichotomy here is in how we can optimally plan spaces, public, private or industrial, to drive performance and flexibility. Does flexibility go in the way of peak performance layout? Or are intelligent, adaptable systems going to be the best option to keep operations agile?

 

The checkout line’s death knell


We’re all only about ten years away from sauntering into stores, grabbing whatever it is we want, then quick-stepping out like we stole it. It’ll be possible because many shops will be ringed with machine vision-enabling cameras and sensors that keep tabs on what you take while inside and then charge it to the corresponding app as you leave.

Read the full article (and watch the great video!) here.

 

Walmart is ‘secretly’ testing self-driving floor scrubbers, signaling that more robots are coming

floors scr

Walmart has been quietly testing out autonomous floor scrubbers during the overnight shifts in five store locations near the company’s headquarters in Bentonville, Arkansas. A spokesperson for Walmart told FOX Business that the move, which was first reported by LinkedIn, is a “very small proof of concept pilot that we are running” and that the company still has a lot more to learn about how this technology “might work best in our different retail locations.”

Read the full article here.

 

Cities Should Not Design for Autonomous Vehicles

Autonomous cars are likely to be better off relying on each other than on fixed infrastructure. As autonomous vehicles capture a larger share of road traffic, they will be able to crowdsource extremely-detailed, real-time maps of urban roads. Each member of the network will benefit from the information provided by other vehicles and would likely provide its own data in exchange for access.

Read the full article here.

 

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