Does the Govt. know how to help advance AM? (Authentise Weekly News-In-Review – Week 69)

We see AM being the centrepiece of many govt. grants in recent years, and rightly so. The technology has the potential to boost the industrial capacity of a country, as well as draw the attention of research projects which would prefer the most favorable technological hotspot. So, are countries doing enough to spur innovation within their confines? What are the best practices to nourish the industry and its development? The key drivers are education, industry and resources. In this respect, finding ways to fill the current skill gap is crucial for the long-term establishment of AM within a country. For example, the UK has been developing wide-ranging curricula for AM through state-funded collaborations. At the same time, the industry needs time and resources to develop the know-how necessary, and this can come through government-backed research centers (see the US’s ORNL or UK’s NCAM) as well as distributing grants, like the Australian BioMedTech Horizons program.

UK’s First AM Apprenticeship Launching This September

The Manufacturing Technology Centre. Photo via MTC.
This September, the Manufacturing Technology Centre (MTC), based in the UK, will launch what are described as the UK’s first additive manufacturing apprenticeships, with the goal of addressing skills shortages within the industry.

The MTC houses the UK’s National Centre for Additive Manufacturing (NCAM). NCAM develops industry ready additive manufacturing processes. It also addresses barriers to the adoption of additive technologies, and legislative and standardisation issues facing the industry.

Read the full article here.

Russia’s $2.6B Jet Engine To Be Made Using AM

ODK-Saturn workshop. Photo via United Engine Corporation

The Aviadvigatel PD-35 is Russia’s next-generation airline jet engine. With a projected budget of 160 billion rubles ($2.6 billion) development of the engine is expected for completion in the next 5 years, and additive manufacturing (or additive technology) is tipped to be an important part of the plan.

For the engine’s development, Russian commercial aircraft developer and builder Aviadvigatel is working with gas turbine manufacturer ODK-Saturn – a company home to the state-funded Additive Technology Center.

Read the rest at 3D Printing Industry.

3D Printing BioPen Receives Investment from Australian Government

In 2016, researchers at the University of Wollongong partnered with orthopedic surgeons at St. Vincent’s Hospital Melbourne to develop the BioPen, a bioprinting pen that allows surgeons to draw new cartilage directly into a patient’s body during surgery. The BioPen project is one of 11 recipients of a $10 million grant announced by the Australian Federal Government. The grant is part of the government’s $35 million BioMedTech Horizons program, which aims to help move more Australian ideas and discoveries toward proof-of-concept and commercialization, as well as stimulating collaboration between the research, industry and technology sectors.

Read the full article here.

 

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We are going to be present at this year’s Rapid + TCT show from the 23rd to 26th of April in Fort Worth, Texasrapid-tct-logo.

 

Please don’t hesitate to reach us if you wish to meet!

Are we at the pinnacle of 3D printing technologies? Not even close. (Authentise Weekly News-In-Review – Week 68)

3D printing technologies have become common tools in prototyping and production environments alike. Many businesses think so highly of them that they believe we have reached the summit of what it can become. Have we reached the summit of 3D printing innovation? Not quite. When it comes to a manufacturing technology, there are many sides from which innovation can find a way to mix things up. Through experimentation in materials, the selection can expand, the manufacturing method itself can be radically reinvented, then there are post-processes etc.. If you combine all these variables you get a system of possibilities that is very difficult to extinguish. Hybridization is also important, bringing the best of different techniques to the fore.

First Thermoset 3D Printer Unveiled at Oak Ridge National Laboratory

The unveiling of the Thermobot 3D printer at the ORNL Manufacturing Demonstration facility in Tennessee. Photo via Innovation Valley Twitter

Magnum Venus Products (MVP), a manufacturer of composite application equipment based in Tennessee, has installed the first large-scale thermoset 3D printer at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Manufacturing Demonstration facility in Tennessee. With this new 3D printer, named the Thermobot, ORNL researchers will be able 3D print with previously unworkable materials.

At the grand unveiling Vlastimil Kunc, ORNL’s lead for polymer materials development said:

“The ability to print thermosets on a large-scale opens new possibilities with respect to the performance and integrity of printed structures”

Read more about it here.

With New 3D Print Smart Ink Objects Can Change Shape And Color

Featured image of With New 3D Print Smart Ink Objects Can Change Shape And Color

A team of researchers at Dartmouth College recently presented a new smart ink which induces shape and color changes in 3D printed objects. The innovation may be the beginning of 4D or intelligent printing. Applications could include a wide range of consumer products, biomedical utilities, and the energy sector.

“This technique gives life to 3D-printed objects,” explained Chenfeng Ke, an assistant professor of Chemistry at Dartmouth. “While many 3D-printed structures are just shapes that don’t reflect the molecular properties of the material, these inks bring functional molecules to the 3D printing world. We can now print smart objects for a variety of uses.”

Read more at ALL3DP.

NASA patents new wire-based Additive Manufacturing process for rocket engine nozzles

A team of engineers at NASA’s Marshall Space Flight Center, Huntsville, Alabama, USA, have developed, hot-fire tested and patented what NASA says is a new wire-based Additive Manufacturing process for the cost-efficient fabrication of rocket engine nozzles. The process, which has been named Laser Wire Direct Closeout (LWDC), uses freeform-directed energy wire deposition.

Paul Gradl, a Senior Propulsion Engineer in Marshall’s Engine Components Development & Technology Branch, explained:

“Our motivation behind this technology was to develop a robust process that eliminates several steps in the traditional manufacturing process.”

Read the full article at Metal AM.

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Big, Longshot Projects Pushing AM to the Limit (Authentise Weekly News-In-Review – Week 67)

Now that we have realized the potential of AM through a period of (still very much ongoing) experimentation, we are now starting to employ the technology on grand challenges never before considered. We’ve made AM flexible and adaptable enough to be used on very large, very demanding scales. Some of these projects have been in the works for quite some time, others have only as of lately become feasible as the technological basis supported the effort. Remember the 3D printed bridge by the MX3D people in 2015? It was finally completed, after a few hurdles and change of plans. Not 3D printed on location as it was originally planned, but the result is stunning nonetheless. In other news, CEO of Relativity Space affirms that the company is capable of 3D printing every part of a rocket, in just 60 days, cutting the number of total parts to 1/10 in the process. Sounds out of this world, but the company already raised $45M to prove its claims. In the racing world, they are accustomed to AM raising the performance metric. LEHVOSS Group wants to take it up a notch by 3D printing an entire sailboat.

 

Welding robots complete 3D-printed steel bridge

The bridge took four robots six months to print

Back in June of 2015, we heard about how Dutch 3D-printing firm MX3D was planning on printing a steel footbridge that would go across Amsterdam’s Oudezijds Achterburgwal canal. Well, construction of that bridge is now complete – although it still has to actually be placed over the water. The finished bridge is 12.5 meters long (41 ft), and took six months to print. It’s composed of 4,500 kg (9,921 lb) of stainless steel, along with 1,100 km (684 miles) of wire. Originally, MX3D hoped to print the bridge on location, with the robots starting at one side of the canal and then building their way across. This turned out to be impractical, however.

Read more about MX3D’s bridge at New Atlas.

 

A Fully 3D-Printed Rocket Is Not as Crazy as it Seems. Investors Agree.

Screen Shot 2018-04-08 at 1.55.18 PM

60 days. That’s how long it will take to produce and launch a rocket if the parts are 3D printed, according to the CEO of Relativity Space, a startup that seeks to do just that. Flying something made completely of 3D-printed parts into space sounds, frankly, pretty bonkers. But investors are on board. The Los Angeles-based startup recently secured $35 million to go ahead with its plan to produce a fleet of spacecraft using one of the largest 3D printers known to man, known as Stargate.

Read more at Futurism.

 

Lehvoss partners with Liverea Yacht to build 3D printed sailboat

Lehvoss 3D printed sailboat

The LEHVOSS Group announced March 14 it is partnering with Livrea Yacht (Palermo, Italy) to build the world’s first 3D printed sailboat. Since work began on the design in 2014, LEHVOSS Group has supported the process development and engineered its LUVOCOM 3F customized 3D printing materials specifically for the application.

According to Francesco Belvisi who is the CTO of OCORE, “The yacht will be highly competitive thanks to the light and strong 3D printed parts. 3D printing dramatically reduces the build time for the yacht and also makes it more economical. We are looking forward not only to building the first 3D printed boat but also to winning the competition in 2019.”

Read the full article here.

 

amug_logo_lgNext week, we are going to be at AMUG 2018, with a few sessions lined up on production AM! Check out the agenda for more information.

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The Rise of Point of Use Manufacturing (Authentise Weekly News-In-Review – Week 66)

Additive manufacturing enables much more than design freedom and improved performance. It is one of the first technologies that is capable of bringing unparalleled production capabilities in a unified package. Through it, manufacturing doesn’t have to rely solely on factories: it can move from a centralized to a decentralized model. We have all the premises to enable point-of-use production to more nimbly address the requirements at a micro scale. There are a variety of cases that would greatly benefit from this added agility. Think a medical emergency which can’t wait for the logistics of tool manufacturing and handling from a 3rd party a great distance away. Having an AM hub near a disaster situation can help first responders address the situation quickly and efficiently. Already the US Navy is experimenting by including AM equipment on ships at sea, capable of autonomously print spare parts and tools, on-demand.

3D printing and the rise of point-of-care medical manufacturing

Chart courtesy SME

As a rule, the healthcare infrastructure doesn’t dabble in manufacturing, but that is changing in dramatic ways, and that transformation is enabled by 3D printing. A white paper published by SME (Dearborn, MI), a nonprofit organization promoting manufacturing technology, explains how point-of-care (POC) manufacturing is reducing healthcare costs while improving patient experience.

Read more about POC manufacturing here.

Plant Inspires 3D Printed Material for Cleaning Up Oil Spills

Salvinia molesta is a floating fern native to South America. Its leaves are extremely hydrophobic and retain a surrounding pocket of air when submerged in water, thanks to tiny water-resistant hairs. On a microscopic level, the leaf hairs align in a structure that resembles an egg beater or whisk. Using a method called immersed surface accumulation 3D printing (ISA 3D printing), the researchers [at the University of Southern California] were able to recreate this egg beater microstructure, called the Salvinia effect, using plastic and carbon nanotubes. The result was a material that was both highly hydrophobic and oleophilic, or oil-absorbing. The combination allows oil and water to be efficiently separated.

Read more about it here.

Full Speed Ahead: Using Additive Manufacturing to Repair Ships at Sea

Researchers Pamir Alpay, left, and Rainer Hebert, hold a sample of 3-D metal printing at UConn's Innovation Partnership Building. (Peter Morenus/UConn Photo)

When a ship runs into trouble at sea, it can be time-consuming and disruptive to take it ashore to get it fixed. A team of UConn engineers has now developed a way for a ship’s crew to pinpoint the exact location of any mechanical trouble on board and, instead of taking the ship offline for maintenance, to repair or replace the part while the ship is still at sea. The researchers, led by associate professor of materials science and engineering Rainer Hebert, have created a device that uses ceramics on additively manufactured metals to obtain signals about degradation or certain other potential problems, such as overheating. They are also developing a field-deployable manufacturing process that could produce replacement parts from electronic files using a 3D printer on board ship after the metal-ceramic parts indicate failure or problems.

Read the full article here.

We are going to be at AMUG 2018, with a few sessions lined up on production AM! Check out this link for more information.

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The Trifecta of Manufacturing Agility: Software, Hardware and the IIOT (Authentise Weekly News-In-Review – Week 65)

The world of today’s economy requires businesses to keep a quick pace with the demands of the market. The globalization of products and services made it so that, to stay competitive, product iteration and deployment must be quick and effective. Fortunately, we have the technological foundation to enable this kind of model. A combination of hardware, software and analytical tools put businesses in the position to close the iterative circle of prototyping and manufacturing in a lean fashion. Manufacturing technologies like 3D printing and hybrid manufacturing platforms give the tools needed to experiment and ultimately produce finished goods for almost any circumstance. The digital world we have weaved enables CAD and software to travel and be shared, creating an ecosystem in which everyone is uplifted. Finally, the IIoT is empowering everyone through the might of data-driven insights, interconnecting information hotspots and putting processing power to work on spotting operational inefficiencies.

Engineers Create 4D Printer that Combines Four 3D Printing Techniques

Engineers Create 4D Printer that Combines Four 3D Printing Techniques

[3D printing] Still somewhat in its infancy, the last decade has witnessed a generous body of research that seeks to exploit its uses more than we could have ever imagined. One example comes from a team from the Georgia Institute of Technology, led by Professor H. Jerry Qi from the University’s George W. Woodruff School of Mechanical Engineering. Their aim was simple: 4D printing. Or put in a different way, to create a machine that combines multiple materials into one 3D printer.

Read the full article here and the paper here.

3D Life Launches 3D Anatomical Heart Library

Justin Ryan, Research Scientist at the Cardiac 3D Print Lab, Phoenix Children’s Hospital, holds a 3D printed heart model. Photo via Philips USA.

[3D Life] are meeting the demand for anatomical models by launching a 3D anatomical heart library, providing medical professionals with access to 3D printing. The USA’s National Institutes of Health offers a similar library covering a broader range of medical models freely available as .STL files, but without the printing services offered by 3D Life.

Leonardo Bilalis, Design Engineer, hopes that the library will promote “better knowledge of [how 3D printed] organs can be used for surgery preparation for complex problems”, “making operations shorter and more efficient.”

Read more about it here.

IIoT Analytics are Just Numbers, Unless You Solve a Business Problem

IIoT-Analytics-are-Just-Numbers-Unless-You-Solve-a-Business-Problem

There is lots of excitement about analytics and machine learning. It’s moving through its hype-cycle but still faces many challenges. Putting aside other challenges, solving real business issues is still a major shortcoming. If your reporting and analytics is counting “things” – just buy a calculator. Find a business problem to solve, and then you will see real value.

 

Read the full article here.

 

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Materials: AM’s next frontier of flexibility (Authentise Weekly News-In-Review – Week 64)

3D printing has always been a wonderful platform for researchers and engineers to experiment on. The manufacturing concepts behind it make it a very flexible tool to create rapidly and cost-efficiently. Presently, the next frontier of 3D printing’s exploration lies in its materials. That’s because material innovation doesn’t only come from Chemistry (although that’s a major part of it). It also comes from physics – specifically driven by our increased ability through additive manufacturing to control the micro-structure of objects below even 1 micron. Already we are witnessing how the technology can help us envision new and improved ways to build or even react to disaster situations through properties that are commonly hard to apply case-per-case.

Plant Inspires 3D Printed Material for Cleaning Up Oil Spills

Using a method called immersed surface accumulation 3D printing (ISA 3D printing), the researchers [at the University of Southern California] were able to recreate this egg beater microstructure, called the Salvinia effect, using plastic and carbon nanotubes. The result was a material that was both highly hydrophobic and oleophilic, or oil-absorbing. The combination allows oil and water to be efficiently separated.

“We tried to create one functional surface texture that would be able to separate oil from water,” said Associate Professor Yong Chen. “Basically, we modified the surface of the materials by using a 3-D printing approach that helped us achieve some interesting surface properties.”

Read the full article here.

Researchers Use 3D Printing to Create Super-Strong Material

Engineering physics professor Roderic Lakes and graduate student Zachariah Rueger have 3D printed a material that behaves in a manner consistent with the Cosserat theory of elasticity, also known as micropolar elasticity. The theory factors in the underlying substructure of a substance when analyzing its performance in a high-stress environment. Lakes and Rueger used the theory to design a polymer lattice that is about 30 times stiffer when bent than would be predicted by classical elasticity theory.

Read more here.

Elastomeric bioink makes 3D printing more flexible

Optical and SEM images printed elastomeric scaffolds.

In a recent study, published in the journal Biofabrication, Burdick’s group carefully altered the viscosity of a biocompatible elastomer so that it could be extruded during printing. At the same time, the scientists formulated their ink to ensure that the material could still be cured effectively with light. If the viscosity was too low, the ink would run too rapidly – which would compromise the fixing stage of the process.

“Until this study, there were few examples of 3D printed elastomers, so it was encouraging to show that photocurable acrylated polyglycerol sebacate is a promising material for the fabrication of elastomeric scaffolds for biomedical applications,” said Jason Burdick of the University of Pennsylvania’s Department of Bioengineering.

Read the full article here.

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Matches made in heaven: the crossroads of innovation (Authentise Weekly News-In-Review – Week 62)

Technologies have often found it beneficial to tap into innovations, sometimes from quite different fields, to find new potential directions to explore. Considering 3D printing’s flexibility, it’s only logical to see it being employed to uplift the possibilities of this or that application. For example, AM enables a new generation of implants to include sensors embedded in them, for a better fit and smarter monitoring respectively. Similarly, in a little validation for us: IIoT is making helping Enterprise Resource Planning (ERP) systems make most of its functions, feeding live, relevant and actionable data to businesses. The matrix of explorations is endless, and combining experimental technologies is showing us new ways to manufacture, design and ultimately, thing about innovation.

Renishaw Case Study: Benefits of Smart Implants with Sensor and 3D Printing Technologies

Renishaw and Western University previously set up the Additive Design in Surgical Solutions (ADEISS) Centre on the university’s campus, which brings together academics and clinicians to work on developing novel 3D printed medical devices. The institute is currently developing technology in the sensor implant field, and recently introduced its smart hip concept, which uses accelerometers and temperature sensors to collect patient data, which is later communicated to a remote device.

Read the full article here.

IIoT And ERP: Powerful Combination Fueled By Data

The IIoT bridges the shop floor and ERP software to allow for the creation and sharing of data in real time. With machine connections, such as programmable logic controllers (PLCs) and sensors, production data is linked to lot, serial and batch details for a seamless flow of information through the cloud. Utilizing data from sensors and other Big Data sources helps businesses analyze data quickly and make better informed decisions. Businesses can better monitor inventory replenishment, sales demands, parts replacement — they can improve virtually any business process to reduce operational and maintenance costs. This is exactly the approach Authentise is following with our data-driven MES.

Read more at Manufacturing Business Technology.

Combining augmented reality, 3D printing and a robotic arm to prototype in real time

Robotic Modeling Assistant (RoMA) is a joint project out of MIT and Cornell that brings together a variety of different emerging technologies in an attempt to build a better prototyping machine. Using an augmented reality headset and two controllers, the designer builds a 3D model using a CAD (computer-aided design) program. A robotic arm then goes to work constructing a skeletal model using a simple plastic depositing 3D printer mounted on its hand.

Read the full article at TechCrunch.

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The importance of recognized standards in AM (Authentise Weekly News-In-Review – Week 61)

As of now, AM has already proven its worth as a manufacturing tool worthy of consideration in many industrial sectors. If it is to find a foothold in every major industry, guaranteeing both stellar performances and safety, standards and best practices need to be delineated. Industrial partners want to ensure the viability of AM workflows on a scalable platform: this requires a thorough understanding of all processes, materials, pipeline steps and so on. Similarly, govt. agencies want to boost its propagation by maximizing safety and reliability across the board. ISO and others have already paved the way, but new partners are now entering: Oerlikon and Boeing are one example in which industrial partners seek common operational ground. The CECIMO European body is another, promoting the adoption of manufacturing standards and AM research centers pushing the bureaucracy forward when it comes to certifications.

Boeing partners Oerlikon to speed up adoption of 3D printing

Boeing is co-operating with Swiss engineering group Oerlikon to jointly develop additive manufacturing processes in a bid to accelerate the technology’s wider employment.

“The research will initially focus on industrializing titanium powder bed fusion AM and ensuring parts made with this process meet the flight requirements of the US Federal Aviation Administration and Department of Defense,” says Oerlikon.

Read more about it here.

AM In Europe Boosted By CECIMO Partnership

Map of CECIMO nations. Image via CECIMO
Map of CECIMO nations. Image via CECIMO

CECIMO, the body behind Europe’s additive manufacturing strategy, has announced a new partnership with EPMA, the European Powder Metallurgy Association. Together, under a joint memorandum of understanding (MOU), the two organizations are aiming to promote the adoption of 3D printing throughout established manufacturing industries.

“If Europe aims to remain a leader in advanced manufacturing production, it will need to succeed in the global race to industrialize additive manufacturing” – comments Filip Geerts, Director General of CECIMO

Read the full article here.

DNV GL launches AM Centre of Excellence to define certification standards for oil & gas and offshore & marine sectors

DNV GL metal part

DNV GL, a global risk assurance and risk management company, is to establish a Global Additive Manufacturing Centre of Excellence in Singapore.

Supported by the Singapore Economic Development Board (EDB), DNV GL will consider qualification and certification, as well as provide training in AM for engineers. In the O&M sector, adoption of AM has been slow because of the challenges surrounding certification, according to DNV GL. The company, thus, wants to provide the industry with technical standards and guidelines to qualify and certify AM equipment, process, products and materials.

Read more at TCT Mag.

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Safety and reliability of metal AM parts (Authentise Weekly News-In-Review – Week 60)

3D printed metal parts are already being employed in very real world situations, from aircraft engine parts to wind turbines. In order to be applicable for these high stress scenarios, metal parts need to comply with very stringent performance standards. 3D printed brakes have been deemed suitable for a Bugatti Chiron, the most powerful super car in the company’s history. You can bet they’ve made their homework prior to putting their whole line of $3M cars on the line. Hydraulic parts manufacturers are utilizing AM to produce components faster and more efficiently than ever before, capable maintaining peak performance in highly pressurized applications. The research is still ongoing, especially in the material sciences. Scientists at the University of Kassel have been able to use AM with a particularly strong steel alloy, which will greatly enhance the safety and reliability of metal parts.

SLM Solutions Metal 3D Printing Brakes The Most Powerful Car In Bugatti History

Bugatti's

[…] 3D printing is implemented for next generation development of the Bugatti Chiron – a car with a price tag close to $3 million. Measuring 41 cm x 21 cm x 13.6 cm (L x W x H) the part claims, by volume, to be “the largest functional component” 3D printed out of titanium. It is also 2 kg lighter than its 4.9 kg machined aluminum counterpart.

“Technically, this is an extremely impressive brake caliper, and it also looks great.” – Frank Götzke, Head of New Technologies in Technical Development at Bugatti Automobiles S.A.S.

Read the full story here.

Aidro Uses Metal 3D Printing to Improve Hydraulic Components

Aidro was founded in 1982 by hydraulics engineer Paolo Tirelli. Today, they use metal 3D printing for making custom designs with complex geometries, lightweight parts, and rapid prototyping.

“With good design methods, we can 3D print a hydraulic manifold that can withstand pressure peaks in the system without any problems,” says Alberto Tacconelli, Managing Director. “We can increase the wall thickness and change the shapes of the channels where the FEM analysis indicates a potential failure.”

Read about in-depth examples at 3DPrint.

EBM 3D Printing Process Used to Process a Steel Alloy with High Damage Tolerance

For the first time, a research team at the University of Kassel in Germany has used additive manufacturing to process a steel alloy with extremely high damage tolerance, which will help in promoting safety and reliability of 3D printed metal parts. […] This type of alloy, thanks to its special deformation mechanisms, holds up very well, and the heat from the EBM process helps to avoid any unpredictable material properties, resulting in a significantly better inner material structure that protects against possible damage.

Read more about it here.

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Metal printing, the coming production phase (Authentise Weekly News-In-Review – Week 58)

Scalability of 3D printing in an industrial context requires a few hurdles to overcome, one of the foremost being printing speeds. Most current generation metal printers have printing times that can’t compete with common injection molding or CNC products, not to mention the time required for post-processing and more. Initially, the metal printing industry was focusing on different features to drive the growth of the sector, specifically material choice, precision and reliability. Now, companies like Seurat Technologies, Velo3D and Spee3D are poised to satisfy the demand to put 3D printers in the factory floor for good. As with FDM tech, SLS patents are expiring and opening the dam for new companies to be born. It’s only a matter of time before 3D printing is going to be competitive from a time standpoint with other traditional manufacturing technologies.

Is Velo3D secretly working to revolutionize 3D metal printing for robotics?

As you might recall, plastic 3D printing really took off back in 2009 when a key patent on deposition technology expired, opening the way for 3D printing technology to significantly drop in price. Metal 3D printing, by and large, relies on the far more expensive selective laser sintering technology, for which the patent expired in 2014. This was, as Silicon Valley expert Tekla Perry reminds the world, just before Velo3D was founded. All metal 3D printing experts, however, believe that the metal breakthrough is to come from the material side (rather than the SLS side), and Perry suggests that Velo3D could be working on that breakthrough.

Find out more about Velo3D here.

Seurat Technologies raises $13.5M to accelerate game-changing metal 3D printing technology

Seurat Technologies, a Silicon Valley-based startup, announces it has raised $13.5 million in a Series A funding round. The significant investment will reportedly be put towards funding and accelerating the company’s much-hyped metal additive manufacturing technology.

Read more about it here.

SPEE3D announces global launch of ‘Supersonic Metal 3D Printing’

SPEE3D, Melbourne, Australia, has announced the company’s official global launch and availability of its industrial metal Additive Manufacturing systems. Designed for scalable, just in time production, SPEE3D is said to be the world’s first metal 3D printer leveraging supersonic 3D deposition (SP3D) technology to deliver manufacturing grade printing at production speeds.

Rather than using heat to melt metal powders, SPEE3D’s patented technology uses supersonic deposition in which a rocket nozzle accelerates air up to three times the speed of sound to deliver manufacturing grade metal and high-density parts.

Read more about it here.

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