Week in Review: November 1st to 7th – Performance through Innovation

Hello everyone, here we go with another Week in Review.

This week we had a clear view at what AM can provide in terms of performance. Through new technologies and collaborations, we are seeing a future in which certain tasks simply couldn’t be accomplished in any other way. GE is testing a prototype engine with 35% AM parts, from 855 to just 12 with improved performance, Lockheed Martin explains how the company incorporated 3D printing to become world’s largest defense contractor and a collaboration between SSL and TUI will see a demonstration of kilometric structures in space through AM satellites. Additive solutions are driving performance parts in every industry:

GE unveils 35% 3D printed ATP engine: ‘more additive parts than any engine in aviation history’

General Electric (GE) has tested a demonstrator engine with 35% additive manufactured parts. The engine was made to validate 3D printed parts for the clean-sheet design Advanced Turboprop (ATP) engine … The all-new lightweight components for the ATP will contribute to a 5% weight reduction, as well as a 1% improvement in specific fuel consumption (SFC). 855 subtractive manufactured parts will be reduced to 12 additive parts, with those 12 making up 35% of the total part count.

Read more here.

Lockheed Martin Looks to Catch Up in 3D Printing

Lockheed Martin is making titanium propellant tanks for satellites using a Chicago company’s electron beam additive manufacturing technology.

Robert Ghobrial, additive manufacturing lead for the company’s training and simulation location in Orlando, FL, spoke at SME’s “Additive Manufacturing Applications: Innovations for Growth” seminar in October, at advanced energy technology accelerator NextEnergy, in Detroit. He traced his work with 3D printing back to 2012, when his team received some MakerBot printers that largely went unused. Along the way, Ghobrial coined the phrase, “The 5Ps of Additive Manufacturing™,” a manufacturing model that describes how AM can help aerospace, defense and other businesses.

Read more about it at Advanced Manufacturing.

“Trusselator” puts additive manufacturing into orbit

Tethers Unlimited Inc’s (TUI) Firmamentum division have announced a collaboration with Space Systems Loral (SSL) that will allow them to demonstrate their on-orbit manufacturing technology, specifically for building kilometer scale space systems. According to TUI, the primary benefit of this on-orbit fabrication is the improved packing efficiency and system mass, which basically means that [companies] can save trips to space by launching highly concentrated fabrication material instead of built on earth structures that have to be deployed in space.

Read more about the collaboration here.

 

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Week in Review: October 25th to 31st – IIoT Prospects

We’ve got Industrial IOT (IIOT) in our crosshair since the launch of Machine Analytics, so maybe that’s the reason we focused on it this week. Or maybe not. Either way, here it is: As digital environments and tools become the norm, businesses that don’t conform to new standards will have staffing issues. A neat infographic shows the concrete way IIoT is helping oil and gas companies boost productivity up to 20% and we also get a deeper look at what cellular networks have to offer to interconnected sensors across sites.

Got your attention? Here we go.

Industry Could Struggle to Attract, Retain Staff Without IIOT

The oil and gas industry could find it hard to attract and retain staff if it doesn’t adopt the industrial internet of things (IIOT), Andrew Hird, vice president and general manager of Digital Transformation at Honeywell Process Solutions, told Rigzone. Speaking at the EMEA HUG conference held in The Hague, Hird stated that IIOT will drive new technologies and outlined that if the upstream oil and gas sector does not allow these new technologies to be deployed, it may lead to staffing issues within the industry.

Read more at Rigzone.

How the Energy Industry Can Use the Industrial IoT to Innovate

As they hunt for more sources of energy, companies are turning to the industrial Internet of Things (IIoT) to achieve these efficiencies and expand operations. Research firm Gartner estimates that 56% of businesses in asset-intensive “heavy” industries like oil and gas will have deployed IoT solutions by the end of 2016. By using wireless connectivity and sensors, energy firms can monitor their assets in the field and achieve higher utilization rates.

Read the whole article at Biztech.

Cellular networks in the IIoT

Typical IIoT applications present cellular networks with additional challenges compared to managing voice calls and high-bandwidth Internet traffic.

Cellular networks have emerged as key components of today’s Industrial IoT (IIoT) networks, especially when it comes to long-distance communication with IIoT endpoints that are installed at field sites. Cellular wide-area networks can provide coverage over several miles, and sometimes across countries, as opposed to the limited coverage provided by Wi-Fi networks. However, the typical IIoT application presents cellular networks with additional challenges compared to managing voice calls and high-bandwidth Internet traffic.

Keep reading here.

 

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Week in Review: October 18th to 24th – Standardization

Here we go again, another week in review for our wonderful following (and newcomers!).

This week is all about standardization: AM standards, legal conundrums and a plea for IIoT to get over the myths that have held it back, such as the need for standardization. Airbus has made ULTEM™ 9085 the standard material for components of its A350 XWB aircraft, bolstering a $15 billion material supply contract with Hexcel Corp. In the mean time, 3D printing’s rising potential to disrupt industrial manufacturing is being analyzed with a series of questions that pose product liabilty under a new light.

Let’s have a deeper look.

$15 billion Boost to 3D Printing Companies from Airbus Contract

Airbus have just announced it is standardizing on ULTEM™ 9085 3D printing material for use in the A350 XWB. OPM partners Hexcel Corp were also included in the Airbus announcement with the news of an update to their $15 billion supply contract. Hexcel make a range of advanced materials including composites for aerospace. ULTEM™ 9085 is a high-performance thermoplastic, offering similar possibilities to PEKK.

Read more about it at 3D Printing Industry.

Products Liability in the Digital Age: Legal Issues Generated by Additive Manufacturing

Although products liability laws are slightly different from jurisdiction to jurisdiction, new legal questions are beginning to arise with the advent of additive manufacturing. In the AM context, for the first time courts will need to address the seemingly obvious threshold questions of “What is the Product?” and “Who is the Manufacturer?”. AM also raises interesting questions concerning what specific theories of liability may be available to plaintiffs alleging injury from 3D-printed products.

Read the full article at Inside Counsel.

Busting 3 Industrial Internet of Things myths

Image for Busting 3 Industrial Internet of Things myths

Unlike consumer markets where standardization, formal or by market dominance, is key to success, for IIoT standardization won’t be a concern for decades. For industries wishing to pursue IIoT it is just to accept that for the foreseeable future there won’t be any standards on how to connect up all their things.

Check out this and two other major IIoT myths at Information Age.

 

Remember to follow us on Twitter as we share more news worthy stories on AM, IIoTIndustry 4.0 and more!

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Week in Review: October 11th to 17th

Hello everyone, here we go for another week in review.

This week we take out the big guns as the US army believes that AM is most certainly at the core of it manufacturing future. Along these lines, future nuclear endeavors will need to exploit AM capability to maintain and update current and future facilities in order to keep facilities up to speed. AM is revolutionary per-se but new industry 4.0 standard practices and IIoT know-how can really drive businesses (even whole countries) to better manage resources and plan operations optimally.

 

Additive manufacturing ‘big part’ of Army future, AMC commander says

Army researchers are conducting case studies to optimize the processing parameters for different material depositions using its customized 3-D printer. Researchers like Ricardo Rodriguez hope to someday print large items like a Soldier's helmet with sensing capabilities embedded in hybrid materials, a potential solution they expect to optimize Soldier capabilities while reducing weight.

Take a walk through Best Buy or Microcenter, and you’ll likely find a 3D printer there making some sort of bauble out of extruded plastic. Army leaders say that kind of additive manufacturing technology has a role in the future of Army logistics and supply. “I’m a huge advocate,” said Gen. Gustave Perna, the new commander of Army Materiel Command. “I believe that our two greatest things that we can really make advancement on are robotics and additive manufacturing. I think there is great strength in additive manufacturing.”

Read more about it here.

 

Improving Nuclear Security with Additive Manufacturing

The Pantex Plant, a federal nuclear weapon facility in Amarillo, Texas, has successfully incorporated additive manufacturing into its tooling operations to revolutionize the way the site pursues its critical mission. In a work environment with little room for error, additive manufacturing has delivered a whole new level of precision and consistency that is helping to ensure the safety of workers, the community and the nation.

Read the full article at Machine Design.

 

Northern Germany is going 100% renewable with Industry 4.0 know-how

windpower

As part of the NEW 4.0 project, the states of Hamburg and Schleswig-Holstein have been merged into one consistent energy region to serve as a joint showcase for Germany and demonstrate that a clean-energy transition is feasible. NEW 4.0 aims to prove that a region with 4.5 million residents can be supplied with re-generative energy as early as 2035 by using 100% safe, affordable, and eco-friendly power sources that can lead to a reduction in CO2 emissions by 50 to 70%.

Read about the project and how industry 4.0 fits here.

 

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Week in Review: 4th October to 10th – AM Put in Perspective

Here we go for another Week in Review.

Additive manufacturing is more than a production tool with advanced features and mouth-watering opportunities, it is a puzzle block of an international effort to realize the vision of the industry of the future, or Industry 4.0. As such, this week we saw further movements in international cohesion as AM standards become the focus of huge global collectives and more questions arise in the face of new financing and leasing unknowns.

Let’s dig in.

ISO & ASTM International Create Additive Manufacturing Standards Development Structure

download-16

As questions arise and larger companies begin pumping out 3D printed components, the need has been obviously for cohesion. And both the International Organization for Standardization (ISO) and ASTM International have stepped in to take care of business, creating the Additive Manufacturing Standards Development Structure. This will offer a comprehensive and much-needed framework that those involved in both additive manufacturing and 3D printing can use for technical standards.

Read the full article here.

Financing the Fourth Industrial Revolution

Manufacturers are no longer restricted to traditional financing arrangements where they would pay for equipment over time and use their own personnel to monitor and service that equipment. Now a variety of purchase/service hybrid arrangements are available and, says Amos, financial executives are increasingly looking at a “fourth generation” of financing which looks “like a service contract by a service provider to a service user.”

Read more here.

New 3D printed titanium satellite inserts by Atos and Materialise are up to 70% lighter

The part in question is a highly loaded insert that is used as mounting point for big and heavy structures, including panels in satellites. As the companies revealed, a joint team performed a comprehensive study of currently used parts, and reduced their weight: in total, the weight was reduced from 1454 grams to 500 grams – a highly impressive 66 percent reduction. It currently costs about $20K to send a single Kg into orbit – so 3D printing more efficient components could save millions in the aerospace sector.

Read more about it at 3Ders.

 

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Week in Review: September 27th to 3rd October – Production Ready AM

Here we are, another week gone by and there’s lots to talk about in the additive manufacturing world.

There have been many news this week indicating an ever diversifying world of AM and much of them hint at the technology’s present capacity for production-ready manufacturing. A volkswagen collaborator has succesfully replicated through AM a full automobile cylinder block, the core of the engine, Elon Musk announced a very ambitious Mars colonization plan, powered by 3D printed components and now Jabil Circuit Inc. has announced plans to enhance their manufacturing services through AM.

Much to discuss this week, let’s get to it.

 

Robert Hofmann GmbH 3D Prints Production-Ready Cylinder Block for Volkswagen Automobile

zylinderblock

Germany-based automotive company Robert Hofmann GmbH has utilized 3D printing technology to create a fully functional cylinder block for a Volkswagen motor. The block received metallurgic and geometric tests from Volkswagen engineers, who used a computer tomography to check internal geometries, such as the cooling jacket around the cylinder tubes. These tests showed that the 3D printed component had low porosity and smaller distortions and deviations compared to the cast iron part.

Read the full article here.

 

Elon Musk Shows How 3D Printing Powers Mission to Colonize Mars

Inside the Carbon Fiber Fuel Tanks

3D printing is at the core of Elon Musk’s ambitious plan to transport more than a million people to Mars during the next forty to one hundred years. Musk has previously discussed how SpaceX use 3D printing to manufacture their Draco engines. Made from Titanium and Inconel, 3D printing allows SpaceX to significantly reduce the cost of fabrication. Integrated cooling channels in the walls of the rocket engine chamber can be created using 3D printing, a process that would be, “a real pain” using traditional methods.

Learn more about AM role in this at 3DPrintingIndustry.

 

Jabil Circuit, Inc. Offers New Services, Including 3D Printing, Offering Competitive Edge for Clients

jabil_fullcolorlogo-jpg

 

 

Jabil Circuit Inc. has just announced that they will be enhancing their manufacturing services with Innovation Acceleration Services. As the name would suggest, they are speeding up the process of product development and the path to commercialization.  “We’re developing a complete ecosystem of digital connections to create new business opportunities, improve experiences and deliver added value, from start to finish.” -Bill Muir, COO at Jabil.

Read more about it here.

 

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3Diax Machine Analytics Released at IMTS – September Newsletter

Welcome back to productivity folks – summer’s officially over. We kicked off the post-Labour day season with a flurry of announcements. As always, if you want to more than just a monthly newscast, sign up to our week-in-review or follow us on twitter! So, without further ado, our big announcement for those seeking total productivity after the summer lull:

Authentise Announces Machine Analytics for Additive Manufacturing 

Authentise 3Diax Machine Analytics Dashboard

First tool to automatically monitor active prints and identify Key Performance Indicators is a key step to moving the technology from lab to production.

Identifying what’s printing, where; automatically updating order status based on print status; easy detecting key KPI’s such as utilization or material use. All that is too hard today. 3Diax Machine Analytics makes it easy.

3Diax Machine Analytics Schedule
3Diax Machine Analytics Schedule

With 3Diax Machine Analytics, this sort of data is automatically captured to more quickly identify available resources, inefficient processes and serve as a foundation for further automation.

You can only improve what you can measure!

Press Release Mountain View, CA, September 12, 2016


Authentise & Additive Show Strong @ IMTS

Additive exploded at IMTS and even got its own part separate side conference & exhibition. The main question from the audience remained the same: How to get from the prototyping stage to the production stage.

Completely speaks to our slogan since our first days in 2013. Authentise 3Diax platform gets larger and larger and the modular open API concept allows companies to seamless exchange of information between the modules and current IT systems and machines to augment well established processes rather than replace them. Our open API acts as a glue in between your applications.

Click here for an overview of all open API modules on the 3Diax platform.


Engineering.com: Authentise Aims to Support Industrialization of Additive Manufacturing

3Diax is a software platform that incorporates 30 different modules dedicated to controlling, monitoring and analyzing manufacturing equipment in order to bring greater efficiency to the production process.

Full article at Engineering.com


Stop ‘wasteful’ processes! Digitize and automate operations – extend Lean to your additive manufacturing workflow with 3Diax’s modular software platform from Authentise. Continuos improvement to elevate efficiency and quality to a higher level. That how you outperform competition!

Schedule Demo here


Authentise on Tour

Our CEO, Andre Wegner, just came back from Dayton, Ohio, where he spoke at the inaugural Additive Manufacturing Industry Summit.

This month we’ll be in Banff, Canada, to speak at the Global Business Forum, and in London, UK. We’ll also be speaking at Singularity University in the Mountain View area. Of course, we always have a presence in Los Angeles and in Salt Lake City. So if you’re in the area – come on by!

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Week in Review: September 19th to 26th – AM Materials’ Expansion

Hello, welcome to another week in review brought to you by Authentise.

This week got a lot of buzz going for breakthroughs and materials bringing excitement to the world of AM: we got 3D printed cemented carbide tools courtesy of Fraunhofer Institute for Ceramic Technologies’ (IKTS) new binderjetting technique, bioengineered plastic spitting bacteria to supply future space missions and a whopping AM breakthrough in flexible thermoelectric devices which promises plummeting prices for coming IoT clothing and more.

Let us begin.

 

Fraunhofer IKTS develops 3D printed carbide tools with adjustable mechanical properties

Fraunhofer IKTS will present 3D printed cemented carbide (hard metal) tools at the World PM2016 Congress & Exhibition… IKTS scientists used a binder jetting 3D printing method to produce the tools. According to the researchers, these 3D printed tools are of comparable quality to those produced using conventional methods, and can be made into more complex shapes.

Read the full article here.

 

Bioengineered bacteria could be used to 3D print food and tools on Mars

cosmocrops d printing best picture the martian

A Danish research team is working on a synthetic biology project called CosmoCrops, which hopes to use bacteria to make it possible to 3D print everything needed for a respectable space mission, using a cutting-edge co-culturing system. To this end, the team has designed a special kind of bioreactor and has bioengineered bacteria that can be used to produce the necessary 3D-printing materials.

Read more at Digital Trend.

 

Nano Dimension paves way for wearables by 3D printing conductive patterns onto fabric

Israeli PCB 3D printing pioneer Nano Dimension has just successfully 3D printed conductive patterns made from silver nanoparticles onto specially treated fabric. This achievement, realized in collaboration with an unnamed leading European functional textiles company, paves the way for sensors and electronics that are actually part of your clothing. It proves that even functional and ‘smart’ fabrics, packed with sensors, are realistic possibilities and do not need to be limited by movement, folding or wearing.

Read the full article here.

 

Research explores thermoelectric screen printing

In work led by professor Yanliang Zhang at Boise State University, high-performance and low-cost flexible thermoelectric films and devices were fabricated by an innovative screen-printing process that allows for direct conversion of nanocrystals into flexible thermoelectric devices. Based on initial cost analysis, the screen-printed films can realize thermoelectric devices at 2-3 cents per watt, an order of magnitude lower than current state-of-the-art commercial devices.

Read more about the breakthrough at ScienceDaily.

 

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Week in Review: September 12th to 18th – IMTS and 3Diax

Hi everyone, here we go again with a new edition of our weekly news review.

In the aftermath of last week’s GE annoucement the industry has a bit of a jump in its step. That was helped with news and announcements coming from IMTS 2016: loads of companies were showing off new and improved 3D printers and more. Predictably, much of it was on the Metal side, although Ingersoll and Oak Ridge also announced a very large composite machine. In other news, yours truly at Authentise had something to announce of our very own: the 3Diax Machine Analytics component of the 3Diax platform.

Let’s dig in.

 

Optomec Launches Line of Low-Cost, High-Value 3D Printed Metal Machine Tools

The Optomec LENS Machine Tool Series integrates Optomec’s industry-proven, metal 3D printing technology into standard CNC machine tool platforms providing lower-cost, higher-value metal additive manufacturing and hybrid solutions. Image: Business WIre

The new LENS Machine Tool Series [announced at IMTS 2016 by Optomec] integrates the company’s robust LENS metal additive manufacturing technology into conventional CNC Vertical Milling platforms, resulting in breakthrough price points as well as the industry’s first Hybrid VMC Controlled-Atmosphere System. It includes three standard configurations, all designed to reduce manufacturing process times and costs while enabling improved end product performance and rapid design changes.

Read the full article at 3D Printing Industry.

 

Engineering Breakthrough in Dissolvable Metal AM

Owen Hildreth, Assistant Professor at ASU’s Ira A. Fulton Schools of Engineering, and his team employed DEP – directed energy deposition – that enables the printing of an object using two kinds of metal at the same time in combination, and then selectively dissolving the “sacrificial” material with a simple electrochemical etching technique. To demonstrate their new approach, they printed the stainless steel arch supported by carbon steel.

Read more about it here.

 

Authentise Releases 3Diax Machine Analytics – Real-time Status Monitoring for Additive Manufacturing

Screenshot of Scheduling Page

3Diax Machine Analytics is the first off-the-shelf component of the 3Diax platform. It enables companies to monitor the status of all their additive manufacturing devices simultaneously, regardless of manufacturer. It also displays key statistics such as machine utilization and material usage on a convenient dashboard or Application Programming Interface (API). This gives companies the edge they need to acquire or maintain their lead.

You can read the full press release on our website.

 

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Authentise Releases 3Diax Machine Analytics – Real-time Status Monitoring for Additive Manufacturing

First tool to automatically monitor active prints and identify Key Performance Indicators is a key step to moving the technology from lab to production.

Mountain View, CA, September 12, 2016 – Building on the success of 3Diax (www.3diax.com), the modular process automation platform helping corporations industrialise additive manufacturing, Authentise has released 3Diax Machine Analytics.

Screenshot of Scheduling Page

3Diax Machine Analytics is the first off-the-shelf component of the 3Diax platform. It enables companies to monitor the status of all their additive manufacturing devices simultaneously, regardless of manufacturer. It also displays key statistics such as machine utilization and material usage on a convenient dashboard or Application Programming Interface (API). This gives companies the edge they need to acquire or maintain their lead. Using the system, customers will be able to increase throughput by quickly identifying available devices no matter where they are based, or reduce material waste by detecting inefficient printers or forgotten half-used material caches.

“You can’t improve what you can’t measure”,  says Andre Wegner, CEO of Authentise and Digital Manufacturing faculty at Singularity University. “Manufacturers and service providers who want to drive additive manufacturing to production scale know that they need operational transparency in real-time. 3Diax Machine Analytics provides it, but it’s just a start – using 3Diax’s other modules to build on the data enables measurable efficiency gain.”

A key element of 3Diax Machine Analytics is its extensibility with corporate IT systems, atop Authentise’s open API’s, or other elements of the 3Diax platform. Utilizing production data intelligently can yield more accurate quotes, automatic distribution of prints, or more efficient material inventory management, among other benefits.

“As the industry overcomes hardware, design and material challenges to identify more and more disruptive use cases for additive, the volumes rise exponentially,” continues Andre Wegner. “Current processes and software solutions are just not ready for that. 3Diax provides a modular solution that integrates and augments existing processes to address discrete automation challenges one-by-one rather than ripping and replacing the whole system.”

3Diax Machine Analytics, currently in beta, is available in the cloud or as locally installable solution. Many 3Diax modules (https://3diax.com/modules.html) have already been released publicly.

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ABOUT AUTHENTISE

Authentise provides modular process automation solutions to leaders in the additive manufacturing market. It’s 3Diax platform builds on patent-pending secure delivery and quality assurance technology and is used by several Fortune 100 companies and leaders in additive manufacturing. Authentise was founded in 2012 and  is based at the NASA Research Park campus in Mountain View, CA as well as Sandy, Utah. It has been covered in Bloomberg, the BBC, Wired, and many other news sources. For further information on Authentise please visit www.authentise.com and follow on Twitter @authentise.

 

Media:

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CONTACT:

Andre Wegner, CEO

info@authentise.com

www.authentise.com