Week in Review: 4th October to 10th – AM Put in Perspective

Here we go for another Week in Review.

Additive manufacturing is more than a production tool with advanced features and mouth-watering opportunities, it is a puzzle block of an international effort to realize the vision of the industry of the future, or Industry 4.0. As such, this week we saw further movements in international cohesion as AM standards become the focus of huge global collectives and more questions arise in the face of new financing and leasing unknowns.

Let’s dig in.

ISO & ASTM International Create Additive Manufacturing Standards Development Structure

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As questions arise and larger companies begin pumping out 3D printed components, the need has been obviously for cohesion. And both the International Organization for Standardization (ISO) and ASTM International have stepped in to take care of business, creating the Additive Manufacturing Standards Development Structure. This will offer a comprehensive and much-needed framework that those involved in both additive manufacturing and 3D printing can use for technical standards.

Read the full article here.

Financing the Fourth Industrial Revolution

Manufacturers are no longer restricted to traditional financing arrangements where they would pay for equipment over time and use their own personnel to monitor and service that equipment. Now a variety of purchase/service hybrid arrangements are available and, says Amos, financial executives are increasingly looking at a “fourth generation” of financing which looks “like a service contract by a service provider to a service user.”

Read more here.

New 3D printed titanium satellite inserts by Atos and Materialise are up to 70% lighter

The part in question is a highly loaded insert that is used as mounting point for big and heavy structures, including panels in satellites. As the companies revealed, a joint team performed a comprehensive study of currently used parts, and reduced their weight: in total, the weight was reduced from 1454 grams to 500 grams – a highly impressive 66 percent reduction. It currently costs about $20K to send a single Kg into orbit – so 3D printing more efficient components could save millions in the aerospace sector.

Read more about it at 3Ders.

 

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Week in Review: September 27th to 3rd October – Production Ready AM

Here we are, another week gone by and there’s lots to talk about in the additive manufacturing world.

There have been many news this week indicating an ever diversifying world of AM and much of them hint at the technology’s present capacity for production-ready manufacturing. A volkswagen collaborator has succesfully replicated through AM a full automobile cylinder block, the core of the engine, Elon Musk announced a very ambitious Mars colonization plan, powered by 3D printed components and now Jabil Circuit Inc. has announced plans to enhance their manufacturing services through AM.

Much to discuss this week, let’s get to it.

 

Robert Hofmann GmbH 3D Prints Production-Ready Cylinder Block for Volkswagen Automobile

zylinderblock

Germany-based automotive company Robert Hofmann GmbH has utilized 3D printing technology to create a fully functional cylinder block for a Volkswagen motor. The block received metallurgic and geometric tests from Volkswagen engineers, who used a computer tomography to check internal geometries, such as the cooling jacket around the cylinder tubes. These tests showed that the 3D printed component had low porosity and smaller distortions and deviations compared to the cast iron part.

Read the full article here.

 

Elon Musk Shows How 3D Printing Powers Mission to Colonize Mars

Inside the Carbon Fiber Fuel Tanks

3D printing is at the core of Elon Musk’s ambitious plan to transport more than a million people to Mars during the next forty to one hundred years. Musk has previously discussed how SpaceX use 3D printing to manufacture their Draco engines. Made from Titanium and Inconel, 3D printing allows SpaceX to significantly reduce the cost of fabrication. Integrated cooling channels in the walls of the rocket engine chamber can be created using 3D printing, a process that would be, “a real pain” using traditional methods.

Learn more about AM role in this at 3DPrintingIndustry.

 

Jabil Circuit, Inc. Offers New Services, Including 3D Printing, Offering Competitive Edge for Clients

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Jabil Circuit Inc. has just announced that they will be enhancing their manufacturing services with Innovation Acceleration Services. As the name would suggest, they are speeding up the process of product development and the path to commercialization.  “We’re developing a complete ecosystem of digital connections to create new business opportunities, improve experiences and deliver added value, from start to finish.” -Bill Muir, COO at Jabil.

Read more about it here.

 

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3Diax Machine Analytics Released at IMTS – September Newsletter

Welcome back to productivity folks – summer’s officially over. We kicked off the post-Labour day season with a flurry of announcements. As always, if you want to more than just a monthly newscast, sign up to our week-in-review or follow us on twitter! So, without further ado, our big announcement for those seeking total productivity after the summer lull:

Authentise Announces Machine Analytics for Additive Manufacturing 

Authentise 3Diax Machine Analytics Dashboard

First tool to automatically monitor active prints and identify Key Performance Indicators is a key step to moving the technology from lab to production.

Identifying what’s printing, where; automatically updating order status based on print status; easy detecting key KPI’s such as utilization or material use. All that is too hard today. 3Diax Machine Analytics makes it easy.

3Diax Machine Analytics Schedule
3Diax Machine Analytics Schedule

With 3Diax Machine Analytics, this sort of data is automatically captured to more quickly identify available resources, inefficient processes and serve as a foundation for further automation.

You can only improve what you can measure!

Press Release Mountain View, CA, September 12, 2016


Authentise & Additive Show Strong @ IMTS

Additive exploded at IMTS and even got its own part separate side conference & exhibition. The main question from the audience remained the same: How to get from the prototyping stage to the production stage.

Completely speaks to our slogan since our first days in 2013. Authentise 3Diax platform gets larger and larger and the modular open API concept allows companies to seamless exchange of information between the modules and current IT systems and machines to augment well established processes rather than replace them. Our open API acts as a glue in between your applications.

Click here for an overview of all open API modules on the 3Diax platform.


Engineering.com: Authentise Aims to Support Industrialization of Additive Manufacturing

3Diax is a software platform that incorporates 30 different modules dedicated to controlling, monitoring and analyzing manufacturing equipment in order to bring greater efficiency to the production process.

Full article at Engineering.com


Stop ‘wasteful’ processes! Digitize and automate operations – extend Lean to your additive manufacturing workflow with 3Diax’s modular software platform from Authentise. Continuos improvement to elevate efficiency and quality to a higher level. That how you outperform competition!

Schedule Demo here


Authentise on Tour

Our CEO, Andre Wegner, just came back from Dayton, Ohio, where he spoke at the inaugural Additive Manufacturing Industry Summit.

This month we’ll be in Banff, Canada, to speak at the Global Business Forum, and in London, UK. We’ll also be speaking at Singularity University in the Mountain View area. Of course, we always have a presence in Los Angeles and in Salt Lake City. So if you’re in the area – come on by!

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Week in Review: September 19th to 26th – AM Materials’ Expansion

Hello, welcome to another week in review brought to you by Authentise.

This week got a lot of buzz going for breakthroughs and materials bringing excitement to the world of AM: we got 3D printed cemented carbide tools courtesy of Fraunhofer Institute for Ceramic Technologies’ (IKTS) new binderjetting technique, bioengineered plastic spitting bacteria to supply future space missions and a whopping AM breakthrough in flexible thermoelectric devices which promises plummeting prices for coming IoT clothing and more.

Let us begin.

 

Fraunhofer IKTS develops 3D printed carbide tools with adjustable mechanical properties

Fraunhofer IKTS will present 3D printed cemented carbide (hard metal) tools at the World PM2016 Congress & Exhibition… IKTS scientists used a binder jetting 3D printing method to produce the tools. According to the researchers, these 3D printed tools are of comparable quality to those produced using conventional methods, and can be made into more complex shapes.

Read the full article here.

 

Bioengineered bacteria could be used to 3D print food and tools on Mars

cosmocrops d printing best picture the martian

A Danish research team is working on a synthetic biology project called CosmoCrops, which hopes to use bacteria to make it possible to 3D print everything needed for a respectable space mission, using a cutting-edge co-culturing system. To this end, the team has designed a special kind of bioreactor and has bioengineered bacteria that can be used to produce the necessary 3D-printing materials.

Read more at Digital Trend.

 

Nano Dimension paves way for wearables by 3D printing conductive patterns onto fabric

Israeli PCB 3D printing pioneer Nano Dimension has just successfully 3D printed conductive patterns made from silver nanoparticles onto specially treated fabric. This achievement, realized in collaboration with an unnamed leading European functional textiles company, paves the way for sensors and electronics that are actually part of your clothing. It proves that even functional and ‘smart’ fabrics, packed with sensors, are realistic possibilities and do not need to be limited by movement, folding or wearing.

Read the full article here.

 

Research explores thermoelectric screen printing

In work led by professor Yanliang Zhang at Boise State University, high-performance and low-cost flexible thermoelectric films and devices were fabricated by an innovative screen-printing process that allows for direct conversion of nanocrystals into flexible thermoelectric devices. Based on initial cost analysis, the screen-printed films can realize thermoelectric devices at 2-3 cents per watt, an order of magnitude lower than current state-of-the-art commercial devices.

Read more about the breakthrough at ScienceDaily.

 

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Week in Review: September 12th to 18th – IMTS and 3Diax

Hi everyone, here we go again with a new edition of our weekly news review.

In the aftermath of last week’s GE annoucement the industry has a bit of a jump in its step. That was helped with news and announcements coming from IMTS 2016: loads of companies were showing off new and improved 3D printers and more. Predictably, much of it was on the Metal side, although Ingersoll and Oak Ridge also announced a very large composite machine. In other news, yours truly at Authentise had something to announce of our very own: the 3Diax Machine Analytics component of the 3Diax platform.

Let’s dig in.

 

Optomec Launches Line of Low-Cost, High-Value 3D Printed Metal Machine Tools

The Optomec LENS Machine Tool Series integrates Optomec’s industry-proven, metal 3D printing technology into standard CNC machine tool platforms providing lower-cost, higher-value metal additive manufacturing and hybrid solutions. Image: Business WIre

The new LENS Machine Tool Series [announced at IMTS 2016 by Optomec] integrates the company’s robust LENS metal additive manufacturing technology into conventional CNC Vertical Milling platforms, resulting in breakthrough price points as well as the industry’s first Hybrid VMC Controlled-Atmosphere System. It includes three standard configurations, all designed to reduce manufacturing process times and costs while enabling improved end product performance and rapid design changes.

Read the full article at 3D Printing Industry.

 

Engineering Breakthrough in Dissolvable Metal AM

Owen Hildreth, Assistant Professor at ASU’s Ira A. Fulton Schools of Engineering, and his team employed DEP – directed energy deposition – that enables the printing of an object using two kinds of metal at the same time in combination, and then selectively dissolving the “sacrificial” material with a simple electrochemical etching technique. To demonstrate their new approach, they printed the stainless steel arch supported by carbon steel.

Read more about it here.

 

Authentise Releases 3Diax Machine Analytics – Real-time Status Monitoring for Additive Manufacturing

Screenshot of Scheduling Page

3Diax Machine Analytics is the first off-the-shelf component of the 3Diax platform. It enables companies to monitor the status of all their additive manufacturing devices simultaneously, regardless of manufacturer. It also displays key statistics such as machine utilization and material usage on a convenient dashboard or Application Programming Interface (API). This gives companies the edge they need to acquire or maintain their lead.

You can read the full press release on our website.

 

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Authentise Releases 3Diax Machine Analytics – Real-time Status Monitoring for Additive Manufacturing

First tool to automatically monitor active prints and identify Key Performance Indicators is a key step to moving the technology from lab to production.

Mountain View, CA, September 12, 2016 – Building on the success of 3Diax (www.3diax.com), the modular process automation platform helping corporations industrialise additive manufacturing, Authentise has released 3Diax Machine Analytics.

Screenshot of Scheduling Page

3Diax Machine Analytics is the first off-the-shelf component of the 3Diax platform. It enables companies to monitor the status of all their additive manufacturing devices simultaneously, regardless of manufacturer. It also displays key statistics such as machine utilization and material usage on a convenient dashboard or Application Programming Interface (API). This gives companies the edge they need to acquire or maintain their lead. Using the system, customers will be able to increase throughput by quickly identifying available devices no matter where they are based, or reduce material waste by detecting inefficient printers or forgotten half-used material caches.

“You can’t improve what you can’t measure”,  says Andre Wegner, CEO of Authentise and Digital Manufacturing faculty at Singularity University. “Manufacturers and service providers who want to drive additive manufacturing to production scale know that they need operational transparency in real-time. 3Diax Machine Analytics provides it, but it’s just a start – using 3Diax’s other modules to build on the data enables measurable efficiency gain.”

A key element of 3Diax Machine Analytics is its extensibility with corporate IT systems, atop Authentise’s open API’s, or other elements of the 3Diax platform. Utilizing production data intelligently can yield more accurate quotes, automatic distribution of prints, or more efficient material inventory management, among other benefits.

“As the industry overcomes hardware, design and material challenges to identify more and more disruptive use cases for additive, the volumes rise exponentially,” continues Andre Wegner. “Current processes and software solutions are just not ready for that. 3Diax provides a modular solution that integrates and augments existing processes to address discrete automation challenges one-by-one rather than ripping and replacing the whole system.”

3Diax Machine Analytics, currently in beta, is available in the cloud or as locally installable solution. Many 3Diax modules (https://3diax.com/modules.html) have already been released publicly.

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ABOUT AUTHENTISE

Authentise provides modular process automation solutions to leaders in the additive manufacturing market. It’s 3Diax platform builds on patent-pending secure delivery and quality assurance technology and is used by several Fortune 100 companies and leaders in additive manufacturing. Authentise was founded in 2012 and  is based at the NASA Research Park campus in Mountain View, CA as well as Sandy, Utah. It has been covered in Bloomberg, the BBC, Wired, and many other news sources. For further information on Authentise please visit www.authentise.com and follow on Twitter @authentise.

 

Media:

3DIAX Logo (Square, Horizontal)

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Screenshot Links

 

CONTACT:

Andre Wegner, CEO

info@authentise.com

www.authentise.com

Week in Review: Sept 5th to 11th – GE in the game!

Hello and welcome back to another Week in Review!

This has been a HUGE week for GE as it rocked the 3D printing market bidding $1.4 billion for the acquisition of SLM Solutions and Arcam. Its push into the AM market has been a driving force in the industry for years and now it’s looking to become the one actively pulling the strings. Here’s a good review of the deal. On the side we have exciting news coming from R&D around the world: telecommunications will soon get a major boost from 3D printed fiber optic tips and South Korea puts yet another 3D printed implant advancement in its wide ranging surgical arsenal.

Let’s get to it.

 

GE bidding $1.4B for Arcam and SLM, speeds up 3D printing push

The logo of General Electric is shown at their subsidiary company GE Aviation in Santa Ana, California April 13, 2016. REUTERS/Mike Blake - RTX2E4CJ

General Electric launched bids on Tuesday to buy two of the world’s top makers of machines for metal-based 3D printing – Sweden’s Arcam and Germany’s SLM Solutions – for a total $1.4 billion to bolster its position in the fast-growing technology. “Additive manufacturing will drive new levels of productivity for GE, our customers, including a wide array of additive manufacturing customers, and for the industrial world,” GE Chief Executive Jeff Immelt said in a statement.

Read more about the acquisition here.

 

Researchers devise method for 3D printing complex structures on micro optical fibers

A joint team of researchers have developed a new and innovative method for 3D printing minuscule but highly complex structures on tips of optical fibers, which have diameters as small as 125 micrometers. … “The development of this new technology offers many advantages in terms of reproducibility, flexibility in the design of optical structures, as well as cost” – Keiko Munechika, co-authore of the study.

Read the full article at 3ders.

 

Korea develops new 3D printed facial implants

image: nanjixiong

Professor Yoon Won-soo from Korea Polytechnic University  have developed a new biodegradable 3D printed implants’ material which will not only greatly avoid any complications but could also accelerate the regeneration of natural tissue. We’ve been using patients’ own bones to produce the implant for quite a long time, which could cause damage to the patient. This new material, however, could be made into satisfactory implants directly and is easier to implant with only two hours’ printing time compared to the original eight hours.

Read all about it here.

 

Authentise is sponsoring the Additive Manufacturing Conference 2016 this year. Check it out!

 

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Week in Review: Aug 29th to Sept 4th – Going Big!

Here we go, another news roundup ready for you.

This week is all about bigger printers and printing BIG! As the race to faster, larger 3D printers gets more and more exciting, EOS is improving its products with more lasers, upgraded print volume and speeds that could rival Carbon3D; in metal this is kind of a big deal. It’s a Guinness World Record week for Oak Ridge and their massive 5m plane wing trim-and-drill tool. Talking big in AM one cannot avoid talking about the MX3D bridge over an Amsterdam’s canal, and now many other companies (and startups!) are bringing their robotic arm printers out to play, first Stratasys, now Branch Technologies with impressive lattice structures for concrete walls.

Without further ado, let’s dig into this week’s huge (pun intended) news.

EOS to launch its biggest and fastest metal 3D printing system at IMTS 2016

eosm400.jpeg

EOS is to introduce its biggest and fastest additive manufacturing system to date at IMTS 2016 in Chicago (Sept. 12-17). Designed for industrial applications, the ultra-fast, quad-laser system builds on EOS DMLS and promises increased productivity, part quality and scalability. [It] offers a large build volume of 400 x 400 x 400 mm with four 400 Watt lasers operating independently. The exceptional beam and power stability ensures highest DMLS part quality and quadruples productivity.

Read more at TCT Magazine.

 

Oak Ridge tool takes world record for largest 3D-printed object

Guinness World Records judge Michael Empric measures ORNL's 3D printed trim-and-drill tool, which is now the ...

Made from carbon fiber and ABS thermoplastic composite materials, the new [plane wing trim-and-drill tool] measures 5.3 x 1.7 x 0.5 m and weighs around 748 kg. To meet the requirements of the record, the item needed to be one solid piece of 0.3 cubic m, which a Guinness World Records judge confirmed at a ceremony. Printable in just 30 hours, it’s an impressive time and cost saver, considering the existing metal version currently takes about three months to manufacture.

Read more about the world record feat at New Atlas.

 

Branch Technology on 3D-printing a better skeleton for concrete structures

KUKA robot used for large-scale 3D printing. Image courtesy of Branch Technology.

Platt Boyd is the Founder and CEO of Branch Technology, a start-up in Chattanooga, Tennessee… . Their Cellular Fabrication (C-Fab) system combines industrial robotics and material science to 3D print a large-scale, optimized lattice system for concrete structures. In order to source the design for the first full-scale application of their system, Branch recently held the Freeform Home Design Challenge—the winning entry by WATG Urban Architecture Studio will start production in early 2017.

Read the full interview here.

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Week in Review: August 22nd to 28th

Here’s our new weekly news roundup, this time we’ve got a bit of everything: big names announcing new 3D printers and partnerships, 4D printing developments and automotive customization on the horizon.

Let’s dig into it.

Stratasys launches two new 3D printers, partners with Boeing and Ford on applications

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Two new 3D printers from Stratasys could revolutionize aerospace and automobile manufacturing, the company announced Wednesday. The machines represent the next step in large-scale 3D printing for manufacturing, which experts say will completely change the field in the next decade. The Stratasys Infinite-Build literally flips FDM on its side, allowing you to 3D print on a vertical plane instead of horizontally, without size limits. It also operates at a speed 10 times faster than previously possible, Sevcik said. It can change in and out different types of material, with process control embedded in the system. Meanwhile, the Robotic Composite 3D Demonstrator enables automation of high-value composite parts for the aerospace and automotive industries, but also for industries such as sporting goods. The machine includes an 8-axis motion system, which uses precise, directional material placement to build strength while reducing or eliminating support strategies—rare for this type of manufacturing, Sevcik said. Stratasys also partnered with Boeing to define the requirements and specifications for the Infinite-Build to meet their needs for customized flight parts. Ford Motor Company is also exploring the machine’s abilities for car manufacturing, Stratasys announced.

Keep reading at TechRepublic.

 

Giving 3D Printing a New Dimension

Lab researcher Jennifer Rodriguez examines a 3D printed box that was "programmed" to fold and unfold when heated. (Photo by Julie Russell/LLNL)

A team of Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory researchers has demonstrated the 3D printing of shape-shifting structures that can fold or unfold to reshape themselves when exposed to heat or electricity. The micro-architected structures were fabricated from a conductive, environmentally responsive polymer ink developed at the Lab. While the approach of using responsive materials in 3D printing, often known as “4D printing,” is not new, LLNL researchers are the first to combine the process of 3D printing and subsequent folding (via origami methods) with conductive smart materials to build complex structures. In the paper, the researchers describe creating primary shapes from an ink made from soybean oil, additional co-polymers and carbon nanofibers, and “programming” them into a temporary shape at an engineered temperature, determined by chemical composition. Then the shape-morphing effect was induced by ambient heat or by heating the material with an electrical current, which reverts the part’s temporary shape back to its original shape.

Read more at Additive Manufacturing.

 

Japanese 3D printed Copens could be customizable from 2017

Japanese automobile company Daihastu and 3D printer manufacturer Stratasys said last year that clients of Copen would be able to design and assemble customized 3D printed exterior panels. Recently they announced that the large-scale customization system is fully prepared and is waiting to be tested. At the moment, the Effect Skins have several different patterns and colors. All drivers could assemble and disassemble the panel according to their changing taste. It is said that there are totally 15 geometric and compound patterns to choose from. They are designed by the designers cooperating with this project. Besides, there are also 10 colors available. It takes about two weeks to change the color of their cars. Traditionally, this whole process could have taken as long as two to three months. What’s more, clients could even redesign their exterior panels, which means drivers of Copen could create unique “skins” of their own!

Read the rest at 3D Printing Industry.

 

Russian researchers are building a drone powered by a 3D printed engine

VIAM, in collaboration with the Russian defense industry Foundation for Advanced Research (FPI) has announced it will be developing a drone that can be powered by a 3D printed engine that has also been developed by VIAM and which was unveiled last month. The small-scale engine is reportedly made entirely from 3D printed parts, weighs only 900 grams, and has a thrust of 75 kilograms. According to VIAM, the 3D printed engine’s thrust could also be increased by another 75kg with only a minimal increase in mass. VIAM, which began working with additive manufacturing technologies in 2015 for the construction of a combustion chamber swirler for an upcoming PD-14 turbofan, has found that 3D printing offers them a more precise and efficient way of manufacturing parts. For instance, using laser sintering technology and metal powder materials, VIAM has been able to produce parts 30 times faster than with traditional manufacturing methods and with a high level of precision. In terms of structure as well, 3D printing has opened to doors for what can actually be produced.

Read the full article here.

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August Newsletter 2016

Hi there, nice to meet you again!
It’s been a long time since our last newsletter – we’ve been busy! From now on, expect to hear from us at the monthly intervals you were used to. Here’s what we’ve been up to since our last newsletter.


 INTEGRATIONS
We’re kicking off work on integrated 3Diax, our modular process automation platform, with three of the world’s leading users of Additive Manufacturing. Projects include:

Clients

These are just the first steps. Each of our clients has a roadmap of automation challenges for our modules to solve. Arrange a time to discuss how we can help your company grow Additive Manufacturing to production scale.


 MODULES

Every time we extend the platform, we open them up to everybody. That’s right, you too! Here are the important updates for this news cycle:

Of course, you could also try one of our existing services including slicingstreaming, or vision.

Now, do yourself a favour and sign up for our newsletter below to get it delivered into your inbox every month: