Shaping our Manufacturing Future (Authentise Weekly 3D News Review – Week 50)

Hey everyone, welcome to our 50th weekly news review! That’s a big number, do the math and we are closing a full year of weekly posting!

Keeping the trend of quality news and insights, this week we have a nice selection which shows how we are identifying and laying the ground to shape up our advanced manufacturing and IIoT future. A report by DHL shows how 3D printing is going to tackle the traditional supply chain, ANSI and America Makes release a preliminary draft for an AM standardization roadmap and, between the most disruptive tech trends of 2017, AM and IIoT take a front page.

Let’s dive in.

3D Printing: A New Dimension

Already, 3D printing, or additive manufacturing, has moved beyond the experimental stage, and is being used in a variety of applications where often the parts are complex to produce or require high levels of customization. DHL has investigated the future of 3D printing in an in-depth study that looks at the implications and uses of the technology across sectors and the supply chain.

Read the report at DHL.

America Makes and ANSI Release Preliminary Final Draft of Additive Manufacturing Standardization Roadmap for Public Feedback

This week, the AMSC released the preliminary final draft of the AMSC Standardization Roadmap for Additive Manufacturing (Version 1.0) to the public for review and comment. The organization plans to have the final document published in February 2017, and currently invites comments and feedback from the public about any revisions needed before publication.

Read more here.

Most Disruptive Tech Trends of 2017

As an amateur futurist I’m always watching the trends of innovation, here are some technology trends I’m keeping a close eye on as we approach 2017. Now we are entering a period where the convergence of multiple technologies and integrations results in an exponentially increasing potential for disruption in the future of work, commerce, manufacturing, Bigdata and AI.

Read the full article here.

 

Come back next week as we gather the best news right here for you!

Advanced Manufacturing Drives Performance (Authentise Weekly 3D News Review – Week 49)

Hello, and welcome to another week in review!

This week we saw a lot of activity surrounding AM, and advanced manufacturing in general, with regards to its ability to bring about unprecedented performance and cost savings. We saw how Renishaw used AM to improve Land Rover’s yacht performance by decreasing the weight of its parts, how paradigm shifts in the factory of the future will reduce conversion costs up to 40% and how reduced lead times can greatly benefit from the horrendous costs of lost production time.

Want to see some numbers and stats? Let’s go!

Renishaw uses 3D printing to improve efficiency of Land Rover BAR yacht

British engineering company Renishaw has used its metal 3D printing expertise to improve the performance of the Land Rover Ben Ainsley Racing (BAR) yacht. The boat now uses a 3D printed sheave case and other metal 3D printed parts. According to Land Rover BAR, the weight in a new AM manifold design for a particular part was reduced by 60%, with an increase in performance efficiency of better than 20% after implementing the custom-made 3D printed component.

Read more here.

 

Factory of the future will reduce conversion costs up to 40%: BCG

Manufacturers who invest in the factory of the future now can look forward to saving 40% of their conversion costs in 10 years, says a study from The Boston Consulting Group. “The factory as we know it today will change radically: assembly lines will be replaced by flexible manufacturing islands, and work pieces will communicate even more extensively with production machinery,” says Daniel Küpper, a BCG partner and head of the firm’s Innovation Center for Operations.

Read more at PLANT.

Metal Additive Manufacturing Saves Time and Money in the Beverage Industry

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If a plant is shut down due to a lack of spare parts, it can lose money extremely quickly – an hour of lost production can cost anywhere from €4,000 up to €30,000, as Packaging Europe notes. But 3D metal printing can ensure that won’t happen. An additive solution, coupled with a CAD design, meant that parts, or even entire assemblies, could be created as a one-shot design for Jung & Co.’s customers. “Manufacturing of the part by conventional means takes around 8-10 weeks including the procurement of the required precision cast part, whereas the Additive Manufacturing takes around one week” explains Thomas, Managing Director of Jung & Co.

Read more here.

 

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Intelligent Additive Order Management 💡💡 – November Newsletter

This month, we were incredibly proud to announce our new 3Diax Manufacturing Execution System.

Additive Manufacturing was hard enough without manual updates to track orders & prints. As the number of prints increases, it gets hard to stay on top of what’s printing, where, what the next steps and customizations are. Now we can help you.

The software provides all the tools needed to organize modern, scalable additive manufacturing operations.

It builds on many 3Diax modules; in particular our announced machine analytics module, which makes it possible to receive seamless updates from printers. This foundation allows for an order status to be automatically updated and provide all parts of operations – from sales to printer operators – with real-time information to deliver quality parts efficiently and reliably.

A customizable dashboard provides instant overview of the automatically updated status of orders.

Features include the ability to create and track orders through shipping, quote, identify key metrics (such as print time), create build trays, automatically update order status based on actual printer data, and track multiple locations at once. MES is available on- or off-premise and works on tablets, phones, and computers.

Exciting new expansions are in the works: automated traceability documentation, material tracking for metal powders, automatic serialization. MES is a tool that manages your shop floor, for you. What features would you like to see? Get in touch now and tell us.

Best, the Authentise Team

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AM as a Force for Good (Authentise Weekly 3D News Review – Week 48)

Hello everyone, this is another edition of the Week-in-Review, brought to you by Authentise!

This holiday season it’s becoming clearer than ever that additive is a force for good, helping us face many of our biggest challenges. The Nepal natural disaster response is shifting gears and starting to employ AM in the reconstruction efforts. Audi is partnering with Part-Time Scientists to participate in the Google Lunar XPRIZE, bringing their AM enabled rover. This shopping season studies are also showing that our “modern” supply chains are not as efficient as we think; local, per-order production driven by AM could be the missing piece.

We’ve got a lot to cover, let’s dig in.

In Nepal, Oxfam earmarks earthquake response funds for 3-D printing

Oxfam is entering a new phase of reconstruction response in Nepal one and a half years after a 7.8-magnitude earthquake devastated much of the Himalayan country. The suite of experimental methods being tried include using repurposed plastic bottles as vital home insulation, 3-D printers to instantly create spare parts in remote rural locations and a handful of mapping mobile apps.

Read more at Devex.

Audi’s lunar rover with 3D-printed parts set to launch next year

Partnering with a space travel group called Part-Time Scientists, Audi have entered the Google Lunar XPRIZE competition. Working together since 2015, the goal is to send the co-developed rover to the moon and complete a set of required tasks. Audi have highlighted 3D printing, specifically, as a particularly helpful technique in the construction of the Lunar Quattro. In this case, the wheels of the rover were made with the aid of 3D printing, reducing down time and saving weight.

Read more at TCT.

‘Free’ Returns Aren’t Free

As those with Black Friday fatigue move to shopping online from the comfort of their homes, they’re attracted not just by deals and promises of free shipping, but also by the increasingly common safety net of free returns. But neither of these services is really free. Much has been written about how much “free” shipping actually costs retailers, and as the ability to return goods at no cost becomes an increasingly normal part of online shopping—particularly during the holidays—that service too is becoming more burdensome for merchants. “The annual retail return rate is around 8% , but can reach up to 30% for e-commerce sales, especially in categories like apparel,” Tobin Moore, the CEO of Optoro, a company that specializes in returns, said in an email.

Read more here.

 

We’ll be back next week for another Week-in-Review!

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Week in Review: November 22nd to 27th – Collaborations Driving 3D

Hi and welcome to another Week-in-Review!

This week there is a treasure trove of evidence that partnerships and collaborations really do make a difference and show a rapidly maturing industry. This week’s examples go full spectrum: Renishaw and Dassault bang brains together trying to solve AM design and optimization issues, a collaboration between Auburn U and Nasa seeks to push the limits of space exploration even further through AM creating and another collaboration has designed and printed the best golf driver in the world.

Want to hear more? Here you go.

Renishaw and Dassault Systèmes pool expertise for the integrated AM experience

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Renishaw is collaborating with Dassault Systèmes, a world leading 3D modelling, simulation and industrial operations software provider, as part of its commitment to provide and enhance software for metal additive manufacturing (AM). “The 3DExperience platform coupled with QuantAM enables parts to be produced accurately from the outset, which is of tangible time and cost benefit to users. It marks the beginning of many enhancements we have in the pipeline to improve the AM user experience and streamline the front-end of the manufacturing process” explained Stephen Anderson, Renishaw’s Director of Group Software.

Read more here.

Auburn University and NASA sign Space Act Agreement on additive manufacturing

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John Mason, Auburn’s vice president for research and economic development, recently signed a Space Act Agreement with Patrick Scheuermann, director of NASA’s Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville to explore additive manufacturing applications using metals, polymers and ceramics. “Great partnerships like this will help us get to places where we’ve never been before,” Scheuermann says. “We can make rockets like our predecessors did . . . but it’s really important to infuse additive manufacturing so that the Space Launch System is affordable and sustainable for decades to come.”

Read the full article here.

Subtractive and additive manufacturing combined to craft world’s most advanced golf driver

KD-1 final result_courtesy of Krone tot-LORE

Race car manufacturer, CRP Group and golfing manufacturer, Krone Golf have combined additive manufacturing and subtractive manufacturing techniques to craft what they believe is the world’s most advanced golf driver. The KD-1 is the first Windform SP 3D-printed driver clubhead with CNC machined titanium hitting surface. It is a composite driver clubhead where the different materials have a specific function and structural competence.

Read more about the driver here.

 

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Week in Review: November 15th to 21st – Industry 4.0 is HERE, Let’s Not Ignore It

Hey everyone, welcome to another Week in Review brought to you by Authentise.

Within the manufacturing industry it’s not always easy to spot the next transformative trend. Within the industry 4.0 we still have lot of ground to cover but the direction is clear: less human employment, higher throughput and much smarter management and upkeep. Nonetheless there are many who sweep the news under the rug and foresee more jobs coming in the near future or dismiss entirely the possibility of such a scenario to be of import to them.

We make the case that industry 4.0 is not only coming, it’s already here. What we once achieved with 25 employees we now do faster with 5. The sheer volume of data that we gather from our manufacturing operations is making it impossible to address it any other way. Let’s embrace the new technologies that will make our business perform better and faster and prepare the next generations to think of manufacturing in terms of interconnectedness and data.

Here are some news to pique your interest.

Manufacturing Jobs Aren’t Coming Back

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Pundits will debate the wellsprings of Donald Trump’s election triumph for years. The decades-long decline of U.S. manufacturing employment and the highly automated nature of the sector’s recent revitalization should also be high on the list of explanations. The former is a source of the working-class rage that helped get Trump elected. The latter is the main reason Trump won’t be able to “make America great again” by bringing back production jobs. Employment in the sector plunged from 18.9 million jobs to 12.2 million [in the last 30y]… More generally, the “job intensity” of America’s manufacturing industries—and especially its best-paying advanced ones—is only going to decline. In 1980 it took 25 jobs to generate $1 million in manufacturing output in the U.S. Today it takes five jobs.

Read the full article at MIT Technology Review.

 

IIoT: From Chaos to Order

Beth Comstock, vice chair at GE, recalled a time not so long ago when corporate executives smirked at the concept of the business value of streaming media. They laughed at the idea of exchanging “analog dollars for digital pennies”. But that’s exactly what happened in television as the industry reshaped itself around the streaming concept and, as a result, digital pennies became digital dollars. This same shift is coming to industry, Comstock said.

Keep reading here.

 

GE Additive to invest $10 million in two educational programmes

GE Additive have today announced a $10 million investment across five years in two educational programmes aimed at developing future talent in additive manufacturing. The additive specialists believe enabling educational institutions to provide access to 3D printers will help accelerate the adoption of additive manufacturing worldwide. “We want to build an ecosystem that drives additive manufacturing across multiple industries,” said Mohammad Ehteshami, Vice President of GE Additive. “GE is committed to this space for the long-term. A new world is coming and we want future generations to have exposure to it from an early age.”

Read more at TCT Magazine.

 

Also, check out the HUGE 3Diax Manufacturing Execution System announcement we made this week!

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Week in Review: November 8th to 14th – Incoming Data Tsunami

Hello, this week we got to witness the power of data on present businesses and good look at what our future has in hold. Information is not only increasing, it’s coming from more devices, in various formats and in very high bandwidths. Every business has to consider how to manage this complex and messy data tsunami. The prize is lucrative: GE foresees that IIoT will increase global GDP by $10-$15 trillion over the next 20 years. At the same time plug & play IoT solutions are making it easier to reap the benefits of networks of sensors and new ways to create and interact with information, digitalizing the world around us, are lowering the bar to enter this world.

There’s a lot to cover in this week’s edition, so let’s get to it.

IIoT could boost GDP by $15 trillion, though data barriers remain

GE research predicts [IIoT] will help generate a $10-$15 trillion boost in global GDP over the next 20 years. Bit Stew Systems commissioned a survey of top IT executives on their readiness for the IIoT revolution. 80% saw the top benefits of IIoT technology as enhanced operating efficiency and uptime. Despite these benefits, 70% are only in the planning phase of integrating IIoT technology. 70% of those surveyed said that proven data modeling and mapping capabilities were the most important aspect of an IIoT platform. However, 64% said that the biggest IIoT challenge stems from difficulties integrating data from a variety of formats and sources, as well as problems extracting business value.

Read the data rich article at ReadWrite.

Plug and play mesh IoT sensor system unveiled

Vicotee AS, part of the Virinco Group of Norway, released at the show a plug-and-play IoT sensor system based on the Smartmesh IP from Linear Technology. The Vicotee system includes Njord sensor modules, the Bifrost gateway, and cloud services for collecting data and managing devices, and operates out of the box collecting temperature, ambient light, humidity, and accelerometer data. The system may well help ease industry’s path to the IIoT.

Read more here.

Microsoft’s 3D Plans and How They May Affect Everyone Else

A 3D scanning concept from Microsoft

In their most recent OS, Windows 10, the company has just provided a series of interesting 3D software tools. The first and most important [effect] is that a great deal more people will be directly exposed to 3D technology. By including this stuff with their software, many more people will bump into it. Secondly, those using the 3D tools will become accustomed to the idea of 3D. The result will be many more 3D-enabled people on the streets of the future. Finally, Those who created systems for providing simple 3D modeling or scanning may suddenly find themselves short customers, because some folks simply found what they needed with Microsoft.

Keep reading at Fabbaloo.

 

This week we will be roaming Formnext‘s booths, see you there!

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Authentise Announces Intelligent Manufacturing Execution System to Automate Additive Manufacturing Operations

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The first tool to track and manage print orders with automatic status updates from printers.

 Mountain View, CA; 14 Nov 2016 – Authentise (www.authentise.com) today announced the 3Diax Manufacturing Execution System (MES). The software provides all the tools needed to organize modern, scalable additive manufacturing operations. It rests on Authentise 3Diax, the world’s first modular process automation platform for digital manufacturing.

In particular, 3Diax MES relies on Authentise’s recently announced machine analytics module, which makes it possible to receive seamless updates from printers. This foundation allows for an order status to be automatically updated and provide all parts of operations – from sales to printer operators – with real-time information to deliver quality parts efficiently and reliably.

3Diax MES originated as 3Diax deployment for a major corporation, with multiple print locations in different continents. The on-premise deployment option enables them to track their global production status securely from any device, anywhere, while 3Diax APIs make it possible to integrate operational information into existing corporate IT systems such as customer relationship management tools.

“After our Machine Analytics tool, 3Diax MES is further proof that the 3Diax platform enables us to innovate more rapidly than any other software provider in manufacturing today,” says Andre Wegner, CEO of Authentise. “This helps us fulfill our clients vision of integrated, automated, industrialized additive manufacturing operations quickly, and easily adapt it to existing operational workflows.”

3Diax MES relies on further 3Diax modules such as file analytics and quoting to provide metrics and estimated costs of designs. Managing third parties and post processing are among dozens of other features. 3Diax MES can also be extended with further powerful 3Diax modules to enable features such as automatic serialization or insightful metrics on additive manufacturing operations.

“The result is a fully flexible operating system that helps ready additive manufacturing for production-scale deployments,” says Wegner. “Many more tools are required to complete this transition, such as improved material handling and traceability reporting. We are lucky to be working with leaders in the field to design and deliver these solutions.”

***

For further information on 3Diax MES, please visit www.authentise.com/3diax/mes.html

About Authentise:

Authentise provides modular process automation solutions to leaders in the additive manufacturing market. Its 3Diax platform builds on patent-pending secure delivery and quality assurance technology to deliver open, flexible APIs to leaders in additive manufacturing, including Fortune 100 companies. Authentise was founded in 2012 and is based in the NASA Research Park campus in Mountain View, CA as well as Salt Lake City, Utah. It has been covered by Bloomberg, the BBC, Wired, and others. For further information on Authentise, please visit www.authentise.com and follow on Twitter @authentise.

Media:

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Contact:

Andre Wegner

+16506918615

info@authentise.com

Fully Integrated Additive Manufacturing ➰ – October Newsletter

Those of you actually printing and building things; you know that making it happen isn’t just about one process or a single step.

That’s why one of our priorities has been integrating with other systems so we can support people getting stuff done rather than opening up many different programs for each stage. So we’re proud this month to have made real progress on that.

First, our integration with EOS printers went into production, further extending the reach of our Machine Analytics tools. That lets you monitor the status, utilization, failure rate and more of your entire production or prototyping facility, not specific to a single Machine Provider, as we told you last month. More transparency leads to better decisions, whether it’s in resource allocation or processes.

Authentise 3Diax Machine Analytics Schedule can tell you what is printing, where.

Integrating doesn’t stop with machines. We’ve just pushed our first integration with other software tools into production too: From now on, we can grab files from Materialise StreamicsTM, process them, and send information back to StreamicsTM. Our specific client wanted to benchmark internal vs. service provider costs without sharing IP. So we deployed our geometric search module, our internal quoting module, our external quoting module and our dashboarding module to give him a real-time benchmarking tool to help defend capital expense decisions and more. But now that this integration is live, you can take advantage of it too.

Of course, we’re integrating into large legacy systems. Those integrations come with significant security protocols attached, so every time we do another client integration we get more secure. Last month’s clients are all among the Global 2,000 top companies – so you can rest assured that our security has been tested, and tested again and that our engineers know exactly what it takes to integrate with your existing legacy systems, such as Single Sign-Ons.


Next up: Many more integrations! We’re thinking Zapier next, which would allow you to integrate our Machine Analytics into over 700 programs including ZohoCMS, Salesforce, Quickbooks and more. What do you want to integrate with? Tell us in reply!

Of course, there are new features coming out too, and next month we have a particularly big release ready to go out. You’ll hear all about it, but we’re also interested in the features you’d like to see more of. Recently our client conversations have revolved around 3 main interest areas, where process automation would be critical: Material Batch Control, Quality Assurance/Traceability Reporting, and Multi-site Print Management. Are they the ones that interest you too?

As always, contact us anytime! We’re going to be at FormNext in November – so if you are too, please let us know and we’ll make sure to meet. Just reply to this mail.

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Week in Review: November 1st to 7th – Performance through Innovation

Hello everyone, here we go with another Week in Review.

This week we had a clear view at what AM can provide in terms of performance. Through new technologies and collaborations, we are seeing a future in which certain tasks simply couldn’t be accomplished in any other way. GE is testing a prototype engine with 35% AM parts, from 855 to just 12 with improved performance, Lockheed Martin explains how the company incorporated 3D printing to become world’s largest defense contractor and a collaboration between SSL and TUI will see a demonstration of kilometric structures in space through AM satellites. Additive solutions are driving performance parts in every industry:

GE unveils 35% 3D printed ATP engine: ‘more additive parts than any engine in aviation history’

General Electric (GE) has tested a demonstrator engine with 35% additive manufactured parts. The engine was made to validate 3D printed parts for the clean-sheet design Advanced Turboprop (ATP) engine … The all-new lightweight components for the ATP will contribute to a 5% weight reduction, as well as a 1% improvement in specific fuel consumption (SFC). 855 subtractive manufactured parts will be reduced to 12 additive parts, with those 12 making up 35% of the total part count.

Read more here.

Lockheed Martin Looks to Catch Up in 3D Printing

Lockheed Martin is making titanium propellant tanks for satellites using a Chicago company’s electron beam additive manufacturing technology.

Robert Ghobrial, additive manufacturing lead for the company’s training and simulation location in Orlando, FL, spoke at SME’s “Additive Manufacturing Applications: Innovations for Growth” seminar in October, at advanced energy technology accelerator NextEnergy, in Detroit. He traced his work with 3D printing back to 2012, when his team received some MakerBot printers that largely went unused. Along the way, Ghobrial coined the phrase, “The 5Ps of Additive Manufacturing™,” a manufacturing model that describes how AM can help aerospace, defense and other businesses.

Read more about it at Advanced Manufacturing.

“Trusselator” puts additive manufacturing into orbit

Tethers Unlimited Inc’s (TUI) Firmamentum division have announced a collaboration with Space Systems Loral (SSL) that will allow them to demonstrate their on-orbit manufacturing technology, specifically for building kilometer scale space systems. According to TUI, the primary benefit of this on-orbit fabrication is the improved packing efficiency and system mass, which basically means that [companies] can save trips to space by launching highly concentrated fabrication material instead of built on earth structures that have to be deployed in space.

Read more about the collaboration here.

 

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