Facing New Dynamics With Technology (Authentise Weekly News-In-Review – Week 03)

Hi and welcome to another edition of the News-In-Review!

On the eve of President-elect Trump’s inauguration, dozens of companies are announcing that they are keeping manufacturing jobs in the US, creating them, or bringing it back: Ford, Alibaba, and Amazon among them. In fact, this is a long term trend: We highlighted a FastCompany article that revealed that apparel manufacturing in the US went up by 35% since 2009. But why? It’s not because customers are expecting improved personalization options (they’re not really), and it doesn’t seem to be about taking advantage of new technologies such as 3D printing. Instead, we think it’s the need to stay agile to consumer needs, and that’s best done by empowering your operators with the new opportunities cloud+data provide. Read our CEO’s latest LinkedIn post below and find out more.

The Uneasy Truth Behind Amazon’s Hiring Blitz And What Startups Are Doing To Fix It

Today, Amazon announced that it will create 100,000 full-time, full-benefit jobs in the United States over the next 18 months. The jobs, Amazon says, will range from entry-level positions to software development roles. The announcement is designed to play nicely into President-elect Trump’s rhetoric about bringing more jobs back to our shores, but it’s important to remember that Amazon’s business model is premised on increasing automation wherever possible, which means replacing more and more humans with machines.

Read the full article at FastCompany.

The dream of Ara: Inside the rise and fall of the world’s most revolutionary phone

In a very personal and thorough recollection of the bold project of modular phone Ara we get a glimpse into how AM was scrapped from the manufacturing plans. “[Paul] Eremenko cut ties with one of Ara’s earliest supporters, 3DSystems, scrapping the project’s dependence on rapid 3D printing for a dye sublimation process. 3DSystems’ printers were too slow, and the new system could adorn modules with selfies and pets.”

Read the full story here.

Trust your People.

People who run manufacturing, sales, logistics or many other core functions in supply chain know how important their team members are: How much they know, how many ideas they have to drive more efficient operations – yet how they have long been stifled by rules, ignored by managers and brushed aside by support staff. No wonder people become demoralised. Modern software tools should be providing relief. Alas, the most recent industrial IoT examples such as GE’s Predix show that this trend looks set to continue. Data Scientists lead IoT projects that get the data to tell them where the problems are rather than asking the people on the front line what stops them from being better at their job. Their findings are enshrined in IT systems as rules not to be tampered with. IIoT is the buzzword, but we are not sure that people are looking at it the right way.

Read the full article on LinkedIn.

 

Don’t forget to follow us on Twitter to get all the share-worthy news related to the 3D printing world!

CES 2017 (Authentise Weekly News-In-Review – Week 02)

Hello and welcome to another edition of News-in-Review!

This week was evidently dominated by one of the biggest shows of the year, CES2017 and with it came a host of awesome additions to AM’s portfolio, as well as our presence in an industrial 3D printing panel!

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Photo courtesy of Adam Jones.

In this edition tagged #CES2017, we present to you new printers and AI powered online AM tools: Autodesk and Titan Robotics team up to enable large build 3D printing with the efficiency of 5 printing heads. a “crazy” printing tech behind Markforged’s new printer allows it to print metal all for $90K and Sculpteo brings AI-powered analysis and evaluation to online metal AM projects.

We got your attention? Let’s go.

CES2017: Really Fast 3D Printing for Large Builds

About a year ago, Autodesk showed off one of the most innovative filament printers in recent memory. Project Escher is your basic Cartesian filament printer, but with a twist: it has five heads. These print heads work together to build large objects very quickly. Autodesk open sourced the design of the Escher, and now it’s made it into commercial production thanks to Titan Robotics. The Cronus, which uses the same software as Project Escher, is big! Each of these gantries is driven by closed-loop servo motors and fancy ball screws, producing a total build volume of 77″x30″x20″.

Read more about it here.

The Markforged Metal X Prints Real Metal Parts

At CES 2017 today Markforged have announced what might be a revolution in 3D printing, a desktop metal 3D printer called the Metal X. […] The secret to bringing 3D metal printing to the desktop is the Atomic Diffusion Additive Manufacturing (ADAM) process. According to the company this creates, “a part using a bound metal powder rod that transforms into a dense metal part in one easy step. Bulk sintering provides crystal growth through all axes giving your parts excellent mechanical properties in all directions.”

Read more about the printer here.

Sculpteo Brings Artificial Intelligence to Metal Additive Manufacturing with Agile Metal Technology

[Sculpteo is] bringing artificial intelligence to metal 3D printing. They just unveiled Agile Metal Technology, an online agent-based system used to help designers and manufacturers analyze and evaluate metal additive manufacturing projects. […] Their new Agile Metal Technology is very versatile, with the ability to automate complex procedures, locate and correct problems, find the “best fit” processes and techniques, and even offer recommendations on how to optimize design elements like lattices and supports.

Read the full article here.

 

That’s is it for this week, be sure to follow us on Twitter to get more juicy news and those that are not included in the News-In-Review!

Enabling Research Through AM (Authentise Weekly News-In-Review – Week 01)

Hi everyone, welcome back to the new year with a more weekly 3D printing news from Authentise!

Through AM scientists are able to go where traditional manufacturing simply couldn’t take them. NASA is keeping up the pace for the entirely 3D printed rocket by testing more and more components up for the challenge, ROSCOSMOS is planning to add a bioprinter to the ISS’s arsenal and test it at microgravity and, while we’re at it, stem cell research is getting a boost from 3D printing’s ability to create cartilage’s structures.

Are you aching for your daily fix of science with a side of AM? Let’s dig in.

NASA Engineers Test Combustion Chamber to Advance 3-D Printed Rocket Engine Design

Recent tests of a developmental rocket engine at NASA‘s Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Alabama, produced all the performance data engineers were hoping for, along with the traditional fire and roar. But this engine is anything but traditional. Marshall engineers are designing each of the components from scratch to ultimately be made entirely by AM methods …The series of 12 test firings in late fall brought them a big step closer to that goal, said Andrew Hanks, test lead for the project. The fuel turbopump, fuel injector, valves and other major engine components used in the tests were 3D printed, with the exception of the main combustion chamber.

Read more of these test firings at NASA.

 

Russian space agency Roscosmos to 3D print living tissue on ISS

Russian scientists are planning to install and operate a 3D bioprinter aboard the ISS, according to an official source. They believe that microgravity conditions could actually improve the bioprinting process. […] They believe that significant progress in bioprinting can be achieved by placing equipment in microgravity conditions, since the lack of gravity could potentially help to keep deposited cells in place.

Read the full article here.

Scientists Are Creating New Ears With 3D-Printing and Human Stem Cells

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Inspired by the earmouse, doctors at the University of California at Los Angeles and the University of Edinburgh’s Centre for Regenerative Medicine have perfected a new technique to grow a fully formed human ear, using patients’ own stem cells. They begin with a 3D printed polymer mold of an ear, which is then implanted with stem cells drawn from fat. As these stem cells differentiate into cartilage, the polymer scaffold degrades, leaving a full “ear” made of mature cartilage cells. The new approach could “change all aspects of surgical care,” says Dr. Ken Stewart, one of the researchers and a plastic surgeon at the Royal Hospital for Sick Children.

Read the whole article at Smithsonian.

 

More next week

Integrating the Future & the Present (Authentise Weekly 3D News Review – Week 51)

Hi all, welcome to another (festive!) edition of the weekly review by Authentise!

We hope you had a merry Christmas time! As we go back to our usual day-to-day, we gathered last week’s juiciest 3D news. Many companies are tackling the issues of integrating their work on new tech into present standards and workflows. Sounds like Organovo’s work on pre-clinical bioprinting is finally getting there, Oas are standards for AM enabled medical. Other times industrialization doesnt need to be so complicated: IIoT allows smaller, incremental steps to be taken to integrate new tech and practices to benefit businesses.

Let’s dig in.

Organovo 3D bioprinted liver tissue could make it to the FDA by 2019

Organovo demonstrate toxicity testing with ExVive liver product. Image via Organovo

Speculation on 3D printed tissue coming to humans sooner than we think is backed by new pre-clinical findings from 3D bioprinting company Organovo. Though it will still be 3–5 years before the U.S. based Organovo apply for clearance of their liver tissue, that is still sooner than perhaps even the FDA had in mind. Pre-clinical trial data shows that 3D bioprinted liver tissue has been successfully planted into lab-bred mice. The human liver-cell tissue shows regular functionality and, at this stage, is being explored as a suitable patch for the organ.

Read more at 3D Printing Industry.

3D Printing Production Medical Devices — Pitfalls And Best Practices

In May 2016, the FDA released a draft guidance titled Technical Considerations for Additive Manufactured Devices. Any manufacturer or organization considering 3D-printed components during the development of a medical device should refer to this document. The guidance goes into detail regarding risk and other considerations related to 3D printing, as well as how to employ 3D printing within device development.

Read the article here and the FDA guidance here.

Use Existing Data to Optimize IIoT Sensor Deployment

It is hard to know where to start [in IIoT], and whether the solution being designed will be palatable to the end customer in terms of function and price. Rather than ordering highly marketed solutions from outside the enterprise and “tipping” consultants with exorbitant fees, they can find ingredients that are already on hand, apply basic analytics, and come up with some surprisingly tasty ways to translate raw data into process information to improve maintenance or business decisions.

Read about the useful, and easy, ways IIoT can easily be integrated in your business here.

 

We hope to see you next week for another edition brought to you by Authentise!

Shaping our Manufacturing Future (Authentise Weekly 3D News Review – Week 50)

Hey everyone, welcome to our 50th weekly news review! That’s a big number, do the math and we are closing a full year of weekly posting!

Keeping the trend of quality news and insights, this week we have a nice selection which shows how we are identifying and laying the ground to shape up our advanced manufacturing and IIoT future. A report by DHL shows how 3D printing is going to tackle the traditional supply chain, ANSI and America Makes release a preliminary draft for an AM standardization roadmap and, between the most disruptive tech trends of 2017, AM and IIoT take a front page.

Let’s dive in.

3D Printing: A New Dimension

Already, 3D printing, or additive manufacturing, has moved beyond the experimental stage, and is being used in a variety of applications where often the parts are complex to produce or require high levels of customization. DHL has investigated the future of 3D printing in an in-depth study that looks at the implications and uses of the technology across sectors and the supply chain.

Read the report at DHL.

America Makes and ANSI Release Preliminary Final Draft of Additive Manufacturing Standardization Roadmap for Public Feedback

This week, the AMSC released the preliminary final draft of the AMSC Standardization Roadmap for Additive Manufacturing (Version 1.0) to the public for review and comment. The organization plans to have the final document published in February 2017, and currently invites comments and feedback from the public about any revisions needed before publication.

Read more here.

Most Disruptive Tech Trends of 2017

As an amateur futurist I’m always watching the trends of innovation, here are some technology trends I’m keeping a close eye on as we approach 2017. Now we are entering a period where the convergence of multiple technologies and integrations results in an exponentially increasing potential for disruption in the future of work, commerce, manufacturing, Bigdata and AI.

Read the full article here.

 

Come back next week as we gather the best news right here for you!

Advanced Manufacturing Drives Performance (Authentise Weekly 3D News Review – Week 49)

Hello, and welcome to another week in review!

This week we saw a lot of activity surrounding AM, and advanced manufacturing in general, with regards to its ability to bring about unprecedented performance and cost savings. We saw how Renishaw used AM to improve Land Rover’s yacht performance by decreasing the weight of its parts, how paradigm shifts in the factory of the future will reduce conversion costs up to 40% and how reduced lead times can greatly benefit from the horrendous costs of lost production time.

Want to see some numbers and stats? Let’s go!

Renishaw uses 3D printing to improve efficiency of Land Rover BAR yacht

British engineering company Renishaw has used its metal 3D printing expertise to improve the performance of the Land Rover Ben Ainsley Racing (BAR) yacht. The boat now uses a 3D printed sheave case and other metal 3D printed parts. According to Land Rover BAR, the weight in a new AM manifold design for a particular part was reduced by 60%, with an increase in performance efficiency of better than 20% after implementing the custom-made 3D printed component.

Read more here.

 

Factory of the future will reduce conversion costs up to 40%: BCG

Manufacturers who invest in the factory of the future now can look forward to saving 40% of their conversion costs in 10 years, says a study from The Boston Consulting Group. “The factory as we know it today will change radically: assembly lines will be replaced by flexible manufacturing islands, and work pieces will communicate even more extensively with production machinery,” says Daniel Küpper, a BCG partner and head of the firm’s Innovation Center for Operations.

Read more at PLANT.

Metal Additive Manufacturing Saves Time and Money in the Beverage Industry

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If a plant is shut down due to a lack of spare parts, it can lose money extremely quickly – an hour of lost production can cost anywhere from €4,000 up to €30,000, as Packaging Europe notes. But 3D metal printing can ensure that won’t happen. An additive solution, coupled with a CAD design, meant that parts, or even entire assemblies, could be created as a one-shot design for Jung & Co.’s customers. “Manufacturing of the part by conventional means takes around 8-10 weeks including the procurement of the required precision cast part, whereas the Additive Manufacturing takes around one week” explains Thomas, Managing Director of Jung & Co.

Read more here.

 

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Intelligent Additive Order Management 💡💡 – November Newsletter

This month, we were incredibly proud to announce our new 3Diax Manufacturing Execution System.

Additive Manufacturing was hard enough without manual updates to track orders & prints. As the number of prints increases, it gets hard to stay on top of what’s printing, where, what the next steps and customizations are. Now we can help you.

The software provides all the tools needed to organize modern, scalable additive manufacturing operations.

It builds on many 3Diax modules; in particular our announced machine analytics module, which makes it possible to receive seamless updates from printers. This foundation allows for an order status to be automatically updated and provide all parts of operations – from sales to printer operators – with real-time information to deliver quality parts efficiently and reliably.

A customizable dashboard provides instant overview of the automatically updated status of orders.

Features include the ability to create and track orders through shipping, quote, identify key metrics (such as print time), create build trays, automatically update order status based on actual printer data, and track multiple locations at once. MES is available on- or off-premise and works on tablets, phones, and computers.

Exciting new expansions are in the works: automated traceability documentation, material tracking for metal powders, automatic serialization. MES is a tool that manages your shop floor, for you. What features would you like to see? Get in touch now and tell us.

Best, the Authentise Team

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PPS: Have you seen our new website?

AM as a Force for Good (Authentise Weekly 3D News Review – Week 48)

Hello everyone, this is another edition of the Week-in-Review, brought to you by Authentise!

This holiday season it’s becoming clearer than ever that additive is a force for good, helping us face many of our biggest challenges. The Nepal natural disaster response is shifting gears and starting to employ AM in the reconstruction efforts. Audi is partnering with Part-Time Scientists to participate in the Google Lunar XPRIZE, bringing their AM enabled rover. This shopping season studies are also showing that our “modern” supply chains are not as efficient as we think; local, per-order production driven by AM could be the missing piece.

We’ve got a lot to cover, let’s dig in.

In Nepal, Oxfam earmarks earthquake response funds for 3-D printing

Oxfam is entering a new phase of reconstruction response in Nepal one and a half years after a 7.8-magnitude earthquake devastated much of the Himalayan country. The suite of experimental methods being tried include using repurposed plastic bottles as vital home insulation, 3-D printers to instantly create spare parts in remote rural locations and a handful of mapping mobile apps.

Read more at Devex.

Audi’s lunar rover with 3D-printed parts set to launch next year

Partnering with a space travel group called Part-Time Scientists, Audi have entered the Google Lunar XPRIZE competition. Working together since 2015, the goal is to send the co-developed rover to the moon and complete a set of required tasks. Audi have highlighted 3D printing, specifically, as a particularly helpful technique in the construction of the Lunar Quattro. In this case, the wheels of the rover were made with the aid of 3D printing, reducing down time and saving weight.

Read more at TCT.

‘Free’ Returns Aren’t Free

As those with Black Friday fatigue move to shopping online from the comfort of their homes, they’re attracted not just by deals and promises of free shipping, but also by the increasingly common safety net of free returns. But neither of these services is really free. Much has been written about how much “free” shipping actually costs retailers, and as the ability to return goods at no cost becomes an increasingly normal part of online shopping—particularly during the holidays—that service too is becoming more burdensome for merchants. “The annual retail return rate is around 8% , but can reach up to 30% for e-commerce sales, especially in categories like apparel,” Tobin Moore, the CEO of Optoro, a company that specializes in returns, said in an email.

Read more here.

 

We’ll be back next week for another Week-in-Review!

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Week in Review: November 22nd to 27th – Collaborations Driving 3D

Hi and welcome to another Week-in-Review!

This week there is a treasure trove of evidence that partnerships and collaborations really do make a difference and show a rapidly maturing industry. This week’s examples go full spectrum: Renishaw and Dassault bang brains together trying to solve AM design and optimization issues, a collaboration between Auburn U and Nasa seeks to push the limits of space exploration even further through AM creating and another collaboration has designed and printed the best golf driver in the world.

Want to hear more? Here you go.

Renishaw and Dassault Systèmes pool expertise for the integrated AM experience

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Renishaw is collaborating with Dassault Systèmes, a world leading 3D modelling, simulation and industrial operations software provider, as part of its commitment to provide and enhance software for metal additive manufacturing (AM). “The 3DExperience platform coupled with QuantAM enables parts to be produced accurately from the outset, which is of tangible time and cost benefit to users. It marks the beginning of many enhancements we have in the pipeline to improve the AM user experience and streamline the front-end of the manufacturing process” explained Stephen Anderson, Renishaw’s Director of Group Software.

Read more here.

Auburn University and NASA sign Space Act Agreement on additive manufacturing

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John Mason, Auburn’s vice president for research and economic development, recently signed a Space Act Agreement with Patrick Scheuermann, director of NASA’s Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville to explore additive manufacturing applications using metals, polymers and ceramics. “Great partnerships like this will help us get to places where we’ve never been before,” Scheuermann says. “We can make rockets like our predecessors did . . . but it’s really important to infuse additive manufacturing so that the Space Launch System is affordable and sustainable for decades to come.”

Read the full article here.

Subtractive and additive manufacturing combined to craft world’s most advanced golf driver

KD-1 final result_courtesy of Krone tot-LORE

Race car manufacturer, CRP Group and golfing manufacturer, Krone Golf have combined additive manufacturing and subtractive manufacturing techniques to craft what they believe is the world’s most advanced golf driver. The KD-1 is the first Windform SP 3D-printed driver clubhead with CNC machined titanium hitting surface. It is a composite driver clubhead where the different materials have a specific function and structural competence.

Read more about the driver here.

 

As always, feel free to sign-up to our newsletter to keep updated with our latest news and updates!

 

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Week in Review: November 15th to 21st – Industry 4.0 is HERE, Let’s Not Ignore It

Hey everyone, welcome to another Week in Review brought to you by Authentise.

Within the manufacturing industry it’s not always easy to spot the next transformative trend. Within the industry 4.0 we still have lot of ground to cover but the direction is clear: less human employment, higher throughput and much smarter management and upkeep. Nonetheless there are many who sweep the news under the rug and foresee more jobs coming in the near future or dismiss entirely the possibility of such a scenario to be of import to them.

We make the case that industry 4.0 is not only coming, it’s already here. What we once achieved with 25 employees we now do faster with 5. The sheer volume of data that we gather from our manufacturing operations is making it impossible to address it any other way. Let’s embrace the new technologies that will make our business perform better and faster and prepare the next generations to think of manufacturing in terms of interconnectedness and data.

Here are some news to pique your interest.

Manufacturing Jobs Aren’t Coming Back

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Pundits will debate the wellsprings of Donald Trump’s election triumph for years. The decades-long decline of U.S. manufacturing employment and the highly automated nature of the sector’s recent revitalization should also be high on the list of explanations. The former is a source of the working-class rage that helped get Trump elected. The latter is the main reason Trump won’t be able to “make America great again” by bringing back production jobs. Employment in the sector plunged from 18.9 million jobs to 12.2 million [in the last 30y]… More generally, the “job intensity” of America’s manufacturing industries—and especially its best-paying advanced ones—is only going to decline. In 1980 it took 25 jobs to generate $1 million in manufacturing output in the U.S. Today it takes five jobs.

Read the full article at MIT Technology Review.

 

IIoT: From Chaos to Order

Beth Comstock, vice chair at GE, recalled a time not so long ago when corporate executives smirked at the concept of the business value of streaming media. They laughed at the idea of exchanging “analog dollars for digital pennies”. But that’s exactly what happened in television as the industry reshaped itself around the streaming concept and, as a result, digital pennies became digital dollars. This same shift is coming to industry, Comstock said.

Keep reading here.

 

GE Additive to invest $10 million in two educational programmes

GE Additive have today announced a $10 million investment across five years in two educational programmes aimed at developing future talent in additive manufacturing. The additive specialists believe enabling educational institutions to provide access to 3D printers will help accelerate the adoption of additive manufacturing worldwide. “We want to build an ecosystem that drives additive manufacturing across multiple industries,” said Mohammad Ehteshami, Vice President of GE Additive. “GE is committed to this space for the long-term. A new world is coming and we want future generations to have exposure to it from an early age.”

Read more at TCT Magazine.

 

Also, check out the HUGE 3Diax Manufacturing Execution System announcement we made this week!

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