Perspectives on AI and the Industry of the future (Authentise Weekly News-In-Review – Week 72)

The field of AI is nowadays established as a core industrial drive in any advanced country. Its wide-ranging applications make it a valuable asset in almost any kind of operation, enabling businesses with unparalleled, yet constantly improving performance. Today, in an industrial setting, AI is being used for process monitoring, data analysis and predictive modeling. It is not surprising to hear of new partnerships in a field such as oil and gas prospecting, where these capabilities can help predict maintenance periods and better process noisy sensor data. The same approach can be used for example in agriculture, where troves of data from a constellation of devices can provide new insights into operational efficiency. The potential for revenue and economic growth is enormous and the international competition is fiercer than ever. Countries such as India are putting resources towards entering a market led by the US and China, but you can definitely expect the list getting longer. How Manufacturing will use AI beyond predictive maintenance is completely open. We have some ideas. What will you do?

Total and Google to develop AI solutions for oil and gas exploration

Total has signed an agreement with Google Cloud for the joint development of artificial intelligence (AI) solutions to accelerate oil and gas exploration and production. Total Group senior vice-president and chief technical officer Marie-Noëlle Semeria said:

“Total is convinced that applying AI in the oil and gas industry is a promising avenue to be explored for optimising our performance, particularly in subsurface data interpretation.”

Check the full article here.

How Industrial AI Can Maximize the Potential of Agriculture’s Planting Season

Industrial AI improves the grower life cycle by turning mountains of otherwise unused ag data into meaningful intelligence. It works at machine scale by synthesizing information from different ag data sources – assets, sensors, weather, satellites, and other systems – and surfacing insights, predictions and recommendations growers can act on. Growers can use new intelligence gained from industrial AI seamlessly and autonomously in the context of their daily workflow to make smarter decisions.

Read it all at PrecisionAG.

India wants to fire up its A.I. industry. Catching up to China and the US will be a challenge

A tech start-up at its office in Gurgaon, India.

India has ambitions to fire up its artificial intelligence capabilities — but experts say that it’s unlikely to catch up with the U.S. and China, which are fiercely competing to be the world leader in the field. An Indian government-appointed task force has released a comprehensive plan with recommendations to boost the AI sector in the country for at least the next five years — from developing AI technologies and infrastructure, to data usage and research.

Read the full article here.

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Rapid+TCT – Authentise Summary (Authentise Weekly News-In-Review – Week 70)

Last week we attended the RAPID+TCT event in Fort Worth, Texas. We were very excited to present our findings on putting Machine Learning to productive uses in additive (slides are here, video coming shortly). During our stay there, we got to see a host of new 3D printers being announced, as well as new, intriguing AM techniques. The list of worthy news would be way too long, so here’s a couple pieces that stood out.

GE Additive unveils Arcam EBM Spectra H machine at RAPID + TCT

GE Additive today unveiled the Arcam EBM Spectra H, a new metal additive manufacturing system designed to handle high heat and crack prone materials. The Arcam EBM Spectra H complements the company’s existing electron beam melting systems.

Read more about the printer here.

MELD Manufacturing Corporation Awarded RAPID + TCT Innovation Award For Patented MELD Technology

On Thursday, April 26, 2018, MELD Manufacturing Corporation was selected from the more than 300 exhibitors at RAPID + TCT 2018 as the recipient of the Innovation Award. MELD is a unique process for additive manufacturing that avoids melting the metal, thereby eliminating the weaknesses and other issues associated with melt-based processes. MELD’s open-atmosphere operation and scalable equipment also make it more efficient and capable of making larger parts than similar processes. In addition to additive manufacturing, MELD can be used to repair, coat, and join a wide range of materials, including some metals that cannot be welded with traditional processes.

Read more here.

 

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Does the Govt. know how to help advance AM? (Authentise Weekly News-In-Review – Week 69)

We see AM being the centrepiece of many govt. grants in recent years, and rightly so. The technology has the potential to boost the industrial capacity of a country, as well as draw the attention of research projects which would prefer the most favorable technological hotspot. So, are countries doing enough to spur innovation within their confines? What are the best practices to nourish the industry and its development? The key drivers are education, industry and resources. In this respect, finding ways to fill the current skill gap is crucial for the long-term establishment of AM within a country. For example, the UK has been developing wide-ranging curricula for AM through state-funded collaborations. At the same time, the industry needs time and resources to develop the know-how necessary, and this can come through government-backed research centers (see the US’s ORNL or UK’s NCAM) as well as distributing grants, like the Australian BioMedTech Horizons program.

UK’s First AM Apprenticeship Launching This September

The Manufacturing Technology Centre. Photo via MTC.
This September, the Manufacturing Technology Centre (MTC), based in the UK, will launch what are described as the UK’s first additive manufacturing apprenticeships, with the goal of addressing skills shortages within the industry.

The MTC houses the UK’s National Centre for Additive Manufacturing (NCAM). NCAM develops industry ready additive manufacturing processes. It also addresses barriers to the adoption of additive technologies, and legislative and standardisation issues facing the industry.

Read the full article here.

Russia’s $2.6B Jet Engine To Be Made Using AM

ODK-Saturn workshop. Photo via United Engine Corporation

The Aviadvigatel PD-35 is Russia’s next-generation airline jet engine. With a projected budget of 160 billion rubles ($2.6 billion) development of the engine is expected for completion in the next 5 years, and additive manufacturing (or additive technology) is tipped to be an important part of the plan.

For the engine’s development, Russian commercial aircraft developer and builder Aviadvigatel is working with gas turbine manufacturer ODK-Saturn – a company home to the state-funded Additive Technology Center.

Read the rest at 3D Printing Industry.

3D Printing BioPen Receives Investment from Australian Government

In 2016, researchers at the University of Wollongong partnered with orthopedic surgeons at St. Vincent’s Hospital Melbourne to develop the BioPen, a bioprinting pen that allows surgeons to draw new cartilage directly into a patient’s body during surgery. The BioPen project is one of 11 recipients of a $10 million grant announced by the Australian Federal Government. The grant is part of the government’s $35 million BioMedTech Horizons program, which aims to help move more Australian ideas and discoveries toward proof-of-concept and commercialization, as well as stimulating collaboration between the research, industry and technology sectors.

Read the full article here.

 

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We are going to be present at this year’s Rapid + TCT show from the 23rd to 26th of April in Fort Worth, Texasrapid-tct-logo.

 

Please don’t hesitate to reach us if you wish to meet!

Are we at the pinnacle of 3D printing technologies? Not even close. (Authentise Weekly News-In-Review – Week 68)

3D printing technologies have become common tools in prototyping and production environments alike. Many businesses think so highly of them that they believe we have reached the summit of what it can become. Have we reached the summit of 3D printing innovation? Not quite. When it comes to a manufacturing technology, there are many sides from which innovation can find a way to mix things up. Through experimentation in materials, the selection can expand, the manufacturing method itself can be radically reinvented, then there are post-processes etc.. If you combine all these variables you get a system of possibilities that is very difficult to extinguish. Hybridization is also important, bringing the best of different techniques to the fore.

First Thermoset 3D Printer Unveiled at Oak Ridge National Laboratory

The unveiling of the Thermobot 3D printer at the ORNL Manufacturing Demonstration facility in Tennessee. Photo via Innovation Valley Twitter

Magnum Venus Products (MVP), a manufacturer of composite application equipment based in Tennessee, has installed the first large-scale thermoset 3D printer at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Manufacturing Demonstration facility in Tennessee. With this new 3D printer, named the Thermobot, ORNL researchers will be able 3D print with previously unworkable materials.

At the grand unveiling Vlastimil Kunc, ORNL’s lead for polymer materials development said:

“The ability to print thermosets on a large-scale opens new possibilities with respect to the performance and integrity of printed structures”

Read more about it here.

With New 3D Print Smart Ink Objects Can Change Shape And Color

Featured image of With New 3D Print Smart Ink Objects Can Change Shape And Color

A team of researchers at Dartmouth College recently presented a new smart ink which induces shape and color changes in 3D printed objects. The innovation may be the beginning of 4D or intelligent printing. Applications could include a wide range of consumer products, biomedical utilities, and the energy sector.

“This technique gives life to 3D-printed objects,” explained Chenfeng Ke, an assistant professor of Chemistry at Dartmouth. “While many 3D-printed structures are just shapes that don’t reflect the molecular properties of the material, these inks bring functional molecules to the 3D printing world. We can now print smart objects for a variety of uses.”

Read more at ALL3DP.

NASA patents new wire-based Additive Manufacturing process for rocket engine nozzles

A team of engineers at NASA’s Marshall Space Flight Center, Huntsville, Alabama, USA, have developed, hot-fire tested and patented what NASA says is a new wire-based Additive Manufacturing process for the cost-efficient fabrication of rocket engine nozzles. The process, which has been named Laser Wire Direct Closeout (LWDC), uses freeform-directed energy wire deposition.

Paul Gradl, a Senior Propulsion Engineer in Marshall’s Engine Components Development & Technology Branch, explained:

“Our motivation behind this technology was to develop a robust process that eliminates several steps in the traditional manufacturing process.”

Read the full article at Metal AM.

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Big, Longshot Projects Pushing AM to the Limit (Authentise Weekly News-In-Review – Week 67)

Now that we have realized the potential of AM through a period of (still very much ongoing) experimentation, we are now starting to employ the technology on grand challenges never before considered. We’ve made AM flexible and adaptable enough to be used on very large, very demanding scales. Some of these projects have been in the works for quite some time, others have only as of lately become feasible as the technological basis supported the effort. Remember the 3D printed bridge by the MX3D people in 2015? It was finally completed, after a few hurdles and change of plans. Not 3D printed on location as it was originally planned, but the result is stunning nonetheless. In other news, CEO of Relativity Space affirms that the company is capable of 3D printing every part of a rocket, in just 60 days, cutting the number of total parts to 1/10 in the process. Sounds out of this world, but the company already raised $45M to prove its claims. In the racing world, they are accustomed to AM raising the performance metric. LEHVOSS Group wants to take it up a notch by 3D printing an entire sailboat.

 

Welding robots complete 3D-printed steel bridge

The bridge took four robots six months to print

Back in June of 2015, we heard about how Dutch 3D-printing firm MX3D was planning on printing a steel footbridge that would go across Amsterdam’s Oudezijds Achterburgwal canal. Well, construction of that bridge is now complete – although it still has to actually be placed over the water. The finished bridge is 12.5 meters long (41 ft), and took six months to print. It’s composed of 4,500 kg (9,921 lb) of stainless steel, along with 1,100 km (684 miles) of wire. Originally, MX3D hoped to print the bridge on location, with the robots starting at one side of the canal and then building their way across. This turned out to be impractical, however.

Read more about MX3D’s bridge at New Atlas.

 

A Fully 3D-Printed Rocket Is Not as Crazy as it Seems. Investors Agree.

Screen Shot 2018-04-08 at 1.55.18 PM

60 days. That’s how long it will take to produce and launch a rocket if the parts are 3D printed, according to the CEO of Relativity Space, a startup that seeks to do just that. Flying something made completely of 3D-printed parts into space sounds, frankly, pretty bonkers. But investors are on board. The Los Angeles-based startup recently secured $35 million to go ahead with its plan to produce a fleet of spacecraft using one of the largest 3D printers known to man, known as Stargate.

Read more at Futurism.

 

Lehvoss partners with Liverea Yacht to build 3D printed sailboat

Lehvoss 3D printed sailboat

The LEHVOSS Group announced March 14 it is partnering with Livrea Yacht (Palermo, Italy) to build the world’s first 3D printed sailboat. Since work began on the design in 2014, LEHVOSS Group has supported the process development and engineered its LUVOCOM 3F customized 3D printing materials specifically for the application.

According to Francesco Belvisi who is the CTO of OCORE, “The yacht will be highly competitive thanks to the light and strong 3D printed parts. 3D printing dramatically reduces the build time for the yacht and also makes it more economical. We are looking forward not only to building the first 3D printed boat but also to winning the competition in 2019.”

Read the full article here.

 

amug_logo_lgNext week, we are going to be at AMUG 2018, with a few sessions lined up on production AM! Check out the agenda for more information.

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The Rise of Point of Use Manufacturing (Authentise Weekly News-In-Review – Week 66)

Additive manufacturing enables much more than design freedom and improved performance. It is one of the first technologies that is capable of bringing unparalleled production capabilities in a unified package. Through it, manufacturing doesn’t have to rely solely on factories: it can move from a centralized to a decentralized model. We have all the premises to enable point-of-use production to more nimbly address the requirements at a micro scale. There are a variety of cases that would greatly benefit from this added agility. Think a medical emergency which can’t wait for the logistics of tool manufacturing and handling from a 3rd party a great distance away. Having an AM hub near a disaster situation can help first responders address the situation quickly and efficiently. Already the US Navy is experimenting by including AM equipment on ships at sea, capable of autonomously print spare parts and tools, on-demand.

3D printing and the rise of point-of-care medical manufacturing

Chart courtesy SME

As a rule, the healthcare infrastructure doesn’t dabble in manufacturing, but that is changing in dramatic ways, and that transformation is enabled by 3D printing. A white paper published by SME (Dearborn, MI), a nonprofit organization promoting manufacturing technology, explains how point-of-care (POC) manufacturing is reducing healthcare costs while improving patient experience.

Read more about POC manufacturing here.

Plant Inspires 3D Printed Material for Cleaning Up Oil Spills

Salvinia molesta is a floating fern native to South America. Its leaves are extremely hydrophobic and retain a surrounding pocket of air when submerged in water, thanks to tiny water-resistant hairs. On a microscopic level, the leaf hairs align in a structure that resembles an egg beater or whisk. Using a method called immersed surface accumulation 3D printing (ISA 3D printing), the researchers [at the University of Southern California] were able to recreate this egg beater microstructure, called the Salvinia effect, using plastic and carbon nanotubes. The result was a material that was both highly hydrophobic and oleophilic, or oil-absorbing. The combination allows oil and water to be efficiently separated.

Read more about it here.

Full Speed Ahead: Using Additive Manufacturing to Repair Ships at Sea

Researchers Pamir Alpay, left, and Rainer Hebert, hold a sample of 3-D metal printing at UConn's Innovation Partnership Building. (Peter Morenus/UConn Photo)

When a ship runs into trouble at sea, it can be time-consuming and disruptive to take it ashore to get it fixed. A team of UConn engineers has now developed a way for a ship’s crew to pinpoint the exact location of any mechanical trouble on board and, instead of taking the ship offline for maintenance, to repair or replace the part while the ship is still at sea. The researchers, led by associate professor of materials science and engineering Rainer Hebert, have created a device that uses ceramics on additively manufactured metals to obtain signals about degradation or certain other potential problems, such as overheating. They are also developing a field-deployable manufacturing process that could produce replacement parts from electronic files using a 3D printer on board ship after the metal-ceramic parts indicate failure or problems.

Read the full article here.

We are going to be at AMUG 2018, with a few sessions lined up on production AM! Check out this link for more information.

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The Trifecta of Manufacturing Agility: Software, Hardware and the IIOT (Authentise Weekly News-In-Review – Week 65)

The world of today’s economy requires businesses to keep a quick pace with the demands of the market. The globalization of products and services made it so that, to stay competitive, product iteration and deployment must be quick and effective. Fortunately, we have the technological foundation to enable this kind of model. A combination of hardware, software and analytical tools put businesses in the position to close the iterative circle of prototyping and manufacturing in a lean fashion. Manufacturing technologies like 3D printing and hybrid manufacturing platforms give the tools needed to experiment and ultimately produce finished goods for almost any circumstance. The digital world we have weaved enables CAD and software to travel and be shared, creating an ecosystem in which everyone is uplifted. Finally, the IIoT is empowering everyone through the might of data-driven insights, interconnecting information hotspots and putting processing power to work on spotting operational inefficiencies.

Engineers Create 4D Printer that Combines Four 3D Printing Techniques

Engineers Create 4D Printer that Combines Four 3D Printing Techniques

[3D printing] Still somewhat in its infancy, the last decade has witnessed a generous body of research that seeks to exploit its uses more than we could have ever imagined. One example comes from a team from the Georgia Institute of Technology, led by Professor H. Jerry Qi from the University’s George W. Woodruff School of Mechanical Engineering. Their aim was simple: 4D printing. Or put in a different way, to create a machine that combines multiple materials into one 3D printer.

Read the full article here and the paper here.

3D Life Launches 3D Anatomical Heart Library

Justin Ryan, Research Scientist at the Cardiac 3D Print Lab, Phoenix Children’s Hospital, holds a 3D printed heart model. Photo via Philips USA.

[3D Life] are meeting the demand for anatomical models by launching a 3D anatomical heart library, providing medical professionals with access to 3D printing. The USA’s National Institutes of Health offers a similar library covering a broader range of medical models freely available as .STL files, but without the printing services offered by 3D Life.

Leonardo Bilalis, Design Engineer, hopes that the library will promote “better knowledge of [how 3D printed] organs can be used for surgery preparation for complex problems”, “making operations shorter and more efficient.”

Read more about it here.

IIoT Analytics are Just Numbers, Unless You Solve a Business Problem

IIoT-Analytics-are-Just-Numbers-Unless-You-Solve-a-Business-Problem

There is lots of excitement about analytics and machine learning. It’s moving through its hype-cycle but still faces many challenges. Putting aside other challenges, solving real business issues is still a major shortcoming. If your reporting and analytics is counting “things” – just buy a calculator. Find a business problem to solve, and then you will see real value.

 

Read the full article here.

 

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Materials: AM’s next frontier of flexibility (Authentise Weekly News-In-Review – Week 64)

3D printing has always been a wonderful platform for researchers and engineers to experiment on. The manufacturing concepts behind it make it a very flexible tool to create rapidly and cost-efficiently. Presently, the next frontier of 3D printing’s exploration lies in its materials. That’s because material innovation doesn’t only come from Chemistry (although that’s a major part of it). It also comes from physics – specifically driven by our increased ability through additive manufacturing to control the micro-structure of objects below even 1 micron. Already we are witnessing how the technology can help us envision new and improved ways to build or even react to disaster situations through properties that are commonly hard to apply case-per-case.

Plant Inspires 3D Printed Material for Cleaning Up Oil Spills

Using a method called immersed surface accumulation 3D printing (ISA 3D printing), the researchers [at the University of Southern California] were able to recreate this egg beater microstructure, called the Salvinia effect, using plastic and carbon nanotubes. The result was a material that was both highly hydrophobic and oleophilic, or oil-absorbing. The combination allows oil and water to be efficiently separated.

“We tried to create one functional surface texture that would be able to separate oil from water,” said Associate Professor Yong Chen. “Basically, we modified the surface of the materials by using a 3-D printing approach that helped us achieve some interesting surface properties.”

Read the full article here.

Researchers Use 3D Printing to Create Super-Strong Material

Engineering physics professor Roderic Lakes and graduate student Zachariah Rueger have 3D printed a material that behaves in a manner consistent with the Cosserat theory of elasticity, also known as micropolar elasticity. The theory factors in the underlying substructure of a substance when analyzing its performance in a high-stress environment. Lakes and Rueger used the theory to design a polymer lattice that is about 30 times stiffer when bent than would be predicted by classical elasticity theory.

Read more here.

Elastomeric bioink makes 3D printing more flexible

Optical and SEM images printed elastomeric scaffolds.

In a recent study, published in the journal Biofabrication, Burdick’s group carefully altered the viscosity of a biocompatible elastomer so that it could be extruded during printing. At the same time, the scientists formulated their ink to ensure that the material could still be cured effectively with light. If the viscosity was too low, the ink would run too rapidly – which would compromise the fixing stage of the process.

“Until this study, there were few examples of 3D printed elastomers, so it was encouraging to show that photocurable acrylated polyglycerol sebacate is a promising material for the fabrication of elastomeric scaffolds for biomedical applications,” said Jason Burdick of the University of Pennsylvania’s Department of Bioengineering.

Read the full article here.

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Tackling Education in the World of Additive Manufacturing (Authentise Weekly News-In-Review – Week 63)

AM is here to stay but, for many, the technology is a valuable opportunity watched from afar. Why? A big skill-gap is plaguing the manufacturing industry, which has a hard time finding the right people to employ. How is education being updated to bring new engineers up to current standards? What is the role of industrial and public institutions in influencing education? How much knowledge can one attain with a get-dirty, DIY approach?

Countries around the globe are recognizing the impact AM is having on the manufacturing economy and, along with other advanced technologies, are redesigning curriculums to include these trends. Also, industrial conglomerates, who are the most afflicted by the skill gap issues, aren’t standing by: many are rising up to develop training centers and generate activities to turn the tide. Nonetheless, some students are taking matters into their own hands, not only applying themselves to learning but developing business ideas revolving around AM.

Singapore wants elementary schoolers learning 3D printing, robotics, more

Singapore’s Applied Learning Programme (ALP), which aims to deliver hands-on learning programs to primary schoolers, is being expanded. All schools will implement the program, which includes STEM activities like robotics, coding, and 3D printing, by the year 2023.

“Students learn by applying and by doing, and they learn beyond the classroom,” Ng explained. “They see for themselves how they can apply what they have learnt to the real world.” – Singapore’s Education Minister for Schools Ng Chee Meng

Read more about it here.

NCAM calls on industry to help plug additive manufacturing skills gap

MTC NCAM

Given the buzz around AM technologies, you would be forgiven for assuming the message has been received loud and clear but with the UK Government’s recent Industrial Strategy failing to highlight the importance of AM and around 62% of manufacturers planning to undertake some form of move to ‘Industry 4.0‘, the appeal for more education and relevant skills is extremely valid. Within the Manufacturing Technology Centre (MTC) in Coventry, the team at the UK’s National Centre for Additive Manufacture (NCAM) is currently seeking to answer that call by embarking on the task of addressing the AM skills gap.

Read more at TCT Mag.

3D Printing Entrepreneur Reveals Plan for 24h Sneaker Turnaround

A student entrepreneur who developed the idea, technology, and production of his own brand of custom 3D printed sneakers will see his “UnisBrands” products hit the market soon. Nick Unis, who is currently a final year accounting and finance student at Penn State University-Altoona, has been nurturing his idea for custom running shoes since high school. Having now joined the Happy Valley LaunchBox FastTrack Accelerator, Unis plans to ship the first UnisBrands shoes in Summer 2018, with the aim of averting 24 to 72 hours turnaround per pair.

Keep reading the article here.

 

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