Week in Review: November 15th to 21st – Industry 4.0 is HERE, Let’s Not Ignore It

Hey everyone, welcome to another Week in Review brought to you by Authentise.

Within the manufacturing industry it’s not always easy to spot the next transformative trend. Within the industry 4.0 we still have lot of ground to cover but the direction is clear: less human employment, higher throughput and much smarter management and upkeep. Nonetheless there are many who sweep the news under the rug and foresee more jobs coming in the near future or dismiss entirely the possibility of such a scenario to be of import to them.

We make the case that industry 4.0 is not only coming, it’s already here. What we once achieved with 25 employees we now do faster with 5. The sheer volume of data that we gather from our manufacturing operations is making it impossible to address it any other way. Let’s embrace the new technologies that will make our business perform better and faster and prepare the next generations to think of manufacturing in terms of interconnectedness and data.

Here are some news to pique your interest.

Manufacturing Jobs Aren’t Coming Back

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Pundits will debate the wellsprings of Donald Trump’s election triumph for years. The decades-long decline of U.S. manufacturing employment and the highly automated nature of the sector’s recent revitalization should also be high on the list of explanations. The former is a source of the working-class rage that helped get Trump elected. The latter is the main reason Trump won’t be able to “make America great again” by bringing back production jobs. Employment in the sector plunged from 18.9 million jobs to 12.2 million [in the last 30y]… More generally, the “job intensity” of America’s manufacturing industries—and especially its best-paying advanced ones—is only going to decline. In 1980 it took 25 jobs to generate $1 million in manufacturing output in the U.S. Today it takes five jobs.

Read the full article at MIT Technology Review.

 

IIoT: From Chaos to Order

Beth Comstock, vice chair at GE, recalled a time not so long ago when corporate executives smirked at the concept of the business value of streaming media. They laughed at the idea of exchanging “analog dollars for digital pennies”. But that’s exactly what happened in television as the industry reshaped itself around the streaming concept and, as a result, digital pennies became digital dollars. This same shift is coming to industry, Comstock said.

Keep reading here.

 

GE Additive to invest $10 million in two educational programmes

GE Additive have today announced a $10 million investment across five years in two educational programmes aimed at developing future talent in additive manufacturing. The additive specialists believe enabling educational institutions to provide access to 3D printers will help accelerate the adoption of additive manufacturing worldwide. “We want to build an ecosystem that drives additive manufacturing across multiple industries,” said Mohammad Ehteshami, Vice President of GE Additive. “GE is committed to this space for the long-term. A new world is coming and we want future generations to have exposure to it from an early age.”

Read more at TCT Magazine.

 

Also, check out the HUGE 3Diax Manufacturing Execution System announcement we made this week!

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Week in Review: November 8th to 14th – Incoming Data Tsunami

Hello, this week we got to witness the power of data on present businesses and good look at what our future has in hold. Information is not only increasing, it’s coming from more devices, in various formats and in very high bandwidths. Every business has to consider how to manage this complex and messy data tsunami. The prize is lucrative: GE foresees that IIoT will increase global GDP by $10-$15 trillion over the next 20 years. At the same time plug & play IoT solutions are making it easier to reap the benefits of networks of sensors and new ways to create and interact with information, digitalizing the world around us, are lowering the bar to enter this world.

There’s a lot to cover in this week’s edition, so let’s get to it.

IIoT could boost GDP by $15 trillion, though data barriers remain

GE research predicts [IIoT] will help generate a $10-$15 trillion boost in global GDP over the next 20 years. Bit Stew Systems commissioned a survey of top IT executives on their readiness for the IIoT revolution. 80% saw the top benefits of IIoT technology as enhanced operating efficiency and uptime. Despite these benefits, 70% are only in the planning phase of integrating IIoT technology. 70% of those surveyed said that proven data modeling and mapping capabilities were the most important aspect of an IIoT platform. However, 64% said that the biggest IIoT challenge stems from difficulties integrating data from a variety of formats and sources, as well as problems extracting business value.

Read the data rich article at ReadWrite.

Plug and play mesh IoT sensor system unveiled

Vicotee AS, part of the Virinco Group of Norway, released at the show a plug-and-play IoT sensor system based on the Smartmesh IP from Linear Technology. The Vicotee system includes Njord sensor modules, the Bifrost gateway, and cloud services for collecting data and managing devices, and operates out of the box collecting temperature, ambient light, humidity, and accelerometer data. The system may well help ease industry’s path to the IIoT.

Read more here.

Microsoft’s 3D Plans and How They May Affect Everyone Else

A 3D scanning concept from Microsoft

In their most recent OS, Windows 10, the company has just provided a series of interesting 3D software tools. The first and most important [effect] is that a great deal more people will be directly exposed to 3D technology. By including this stuff with their software, many more people will bump into it. Secondly, those using the 3D tools will become accustomed to the idea of 3D. The result will be many more 3D-enabled people on the streets of the future. Finally, Those who created systems for providing simple 3D modeling or scanning may suddenly find themselves short customers, because some folks simply found what they needed with Microsoft.

Keep reading at Fabbaloo.

 

This week we will be roaming Formnext‘s booths, see you there!

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Authentise Announces Intelligent Manufacturing Execution System to Automate Additive Manufacturing Operations

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The first tool to track and manage print orders with automatic status updates from printers.

 Mountain View, CA; 14 Nov 2016 – Authentise (www.authentise.com) today announced the 3Diax Manufacturing Execution System (MES). The software provides all the tools needed to organize modern, scalable additive manufacturing operations. It rests on Authentise 3Diax, the world’s first modular process automation platform for digital manufacturing.

In particular, 3Diax MES relies on Authentise’s recently announced machine analytics module, which makes it possible to receive seamless updates from printers. This foundation allows for an order status to be automatically updated and provide all parts of operations – from sales to printer operators – with real-time information to deliver quality parts efficiently and reliably.

3Diax MES originated as 3Diax deployment for a major corporation, with multiple print locations in different continents. The on-premise deployment option enables them to track their global production status securely from any device, anywhere, while 3Diax APIs make it possible to integrate operational information into existing corporate IT systems such as customer relationship management tools.

“After our Machine Analytics tool, 3Diax MES is further proof that the 3Diax platform enables us to innovate more rapidly than any other software provider in manufacturing today,” says Andre Wegner, CEO of Authentise. “This helps us fulfill our clients vision of integrated, automated, industrialized additive manufacturing operations quickly, and easily adapt it to existing operational workflows.”

3Diax MES relies on further 3Diax modules such as file analytics and quoting to provide metrics and estimated costs of designs. Managing third parties and post processing are among dozens of other features. 3Diax MES can also be extended with further powerful 3Diax modules to enable features such as automatic serialization or insightful metrics on additive manufacturing operations.

“The result is a fully flexible operating system that helps ready additive manufacturing for production-scale deployments,” says Wegner. “Many more tools are required to complete this transition, such as improved material handling and traceability reporting. We are lucky to be working with leaders in the field to design and deliver these solutions.”

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For further information on 3Diax MES, please visit www.authentise.com/3diax/mes.html

About Authentise:

Authentise provides modular process automation solutions to leaders in the additive manufacturing market. Its 3Diax platform builds on patent-pending secure delivery and quality assurance technology to deliver open, flexible APIs to leaders in additive manufacturing, including Fortune 100 companies. Authentise was founded in 2012 and is based in the NASA Research Park campus in Mountain View, CA as well as Salt Lake City, Utah. It has been covered by Bloomberg, the BBC, Wired, and others. For further information on Authentise, please visit www.authentise.com and follow on Twitter @authentise.

Media:

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Contact:

Andre Wegner

+16506918615

info@authentise.com

Fully Integrated Additive Manufacturing ➰ – October Newsletter

Those of you actually printing and building things; you know that making it happen isn’t just about one process or a single step.

That’s why one of our priorities has been integrating with other systems so we can support people getting stuff done rather than opening up many different programs for each stage. So we’re proud this month to have made real progress on that.

First, our integration with EOS printers went into production, further extending the reach of our Machine Analytics tools. That lets you monitor the status, utilization, failure rate and more of your entire production or prototyping facility, not specific to a single Machine Provider, as we told you last month. More transparency leads to better decisions, whether it’s in resource allocation or processes.

Authentise 3Diax Machine Analytics Schedule can tell you what is printing, where.

Integrating doesn’t stop with machines. We’ve just pushed our first integration with other software tools into production too: From now on, we can grab files from Materialise StreamicsTM, process them, and send information back to StreamicsTM. Our specific client wanted to benchmark internal vs. service provider costs without sharing IP. So we deployed our geometric search module, our internal quoting module, our external quoting module and our dashboarding module to give him a real-time benchmarking tool to help defend capital expense decisions and more. But now that this integration is live, you can take advantage of it too.

Of course, we’re integrating into large legacy systems. Those integrations come with significant security protocols attached, so every time we do another client integration we get more secure. Last month’s clients are all among the Global 2,000 top companies – so you can rest assured that our security has been tested, and tested again and that our engineers know exactly what it takes to integrate with your existing legacy systems, such as Single Sign-Ons.


Next up: Many more integrations! We’re thinking Zapier next, which would allow you to integrate our Machine Analytics into over 700 programs including ZohoCMS, Salesforce, Quickbooks and more. What do you want to integrate with? Tell us in reply!

Of course, there are new features coming out too, and next month we have a particularly big release ready to go out. You’ll hear all about it, but we’re also interested in the features you’d like to see more of. Recently our client conversations have revolved around 3 main interest areas, where process automation would be critical: Material Batch Control, Quality Assurance/Traceability Reporting, and Multi-site Print Management. Are they the ones that interest you too?

As always, contact us anytime! We’re going to be at FormNext in November – so if you are too, please let us know and we’ll make sure to meet. Just reply to this mail.

PS: Want to stay on top of weekly 3D printing news, try our weekly news-in-review straight to your inbox. Subscribe now.

Week in Review: November 1st to 7th – Performance through Innovation

Hello everyone, here we go with another Week in Review.

This week we had a clear view at what AM can provide in terms of performance. Through new technologies and collaborations, we are seeing a future in which certain tasks simply couldn’t be accomplished in any other way. GE is testing a prototype engine with 35% AM parts, from 855 to just 12 with improved performance, Lockheed Martin explains how the company incorporated 3D printing to become world’s largest defense contractor and a collaboration between SSL and TUI will see a demonstration of kilometric structures in space through AM satellites. Additive solutions are driving performance parts in every industry:

GE unveils 35% 3D printed ATP engine: ‘more additive parts than any engine in aviation history’

General Electric (GE) has tested a demonstrator engine with 35% additive manufactured parts. The engine was made to validate 3D printed parts for the clean-sheet design Advanced Turboprop (ATP) engine … The all-new lightweight components for the ATP will contribute to a 5% weight reduction, as well as a 1% improvement in specific fuel consumption (SFC). 855 subtractive manufactured parts will be reduced to 12 additive parts, with those 12 making up 35% of the total part count.

Read more here.

Lockheed Martin Looks to Catch Up in 3D Printing

Lockheed Martin is making titanium propellant tanks for satellites using a Chicago company’s electron beam additive manufacturing technology.

Robert Ghobrial, additive manufacturing lead for the company’s training and simulation location in Orlando, FL, spoke at SME’s “Additive Manufacturing Applications: Innovations for Growth” seminar in October, at advanced energy technology accelerator NextEnergy, in Detroit. He traced his work with 3D printing back to 2012, when his team received some MakerBot printers that largely went unused. Along the way, Ghobrial coined the phrase, “The 5Ps of Additive Manufacturing™,” a manufacturing model that describes how AM can help aerospace, defense and other businesses.

Read more about it at Advanced Manufacturing.

“Trusselator” puts additive manufacturing into orbit

Tethers Unlimited Inc’s (TUI) Firmamentum division have announced a collaboration with Space Systems Loral (SSL) that will allow them to demonstrate their on-orbit manufacturing technology, specifically for building kilometer scale space systems. According to TUI, the primary benefit of this on-orbit fabrication is the improved packing efficiency and system mass, which basically means that [companies] can save trips to space by launching highly concentrated fabrication material instead of built on earth structures that have to be deployed in space.

Read more about the collaboration here.

 

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Week in Review: October 25th to 31st – IIoT Prospects

We’ve got Industrial IOT (IIOT) in our crosshair since the launch of Machine Analytics, so maybe that’s the reason we focused on it this week. Or maybe not. Either way, here it is: As digital environments and tools become the norm, businesses that don’t conform to new standards will have staffing issues. A neat infographic shows the concrete way IIoT is helping oil and gas companies boost productivity up to 20% and we also get a deeper look at what cellular networks have to offer to interconnected sensors across sites.

Got your attention? Here we go.

Industry Could Struggle to Attract, Retain Staff Without IIOT

The oil and gas industry could find it hard to attract and retain staff if it doesn’t adopt the industrial internet of things (IIOT), Andrew Hird, vice president and general manager of Digital Transformation at Honeywell Process Solutions, told Rigzone. Speaking at the EMEA HUG conference held in The Hague, Hird stated that IIOT will drive new technologies and outlined that if the upstream oil and gas sector does not allow these new technologies to be deployed, it may lead to staffing issues within the industry.

Read more at Rigzone.

How the Energy Industry Can Use the Industrial IoT to Innovate

As they hunt for more sources of energy, companies are turning to the industrial Internet of Things (IIoT) to achieve these efficiencies and expand operations. Research firm Gartner estimates that 56% of businesses in asset-intensive “heavy” industries like oil and gas will have deployed IoT solutions by the end of 2016. By using wireless connectivity and sensors, energy firms can monitor their assets in the field and achieve higher utilization rates.

Read the whole article at Biztech.

Cellular networks in the IIoT

Typical IIoT applications present cellular networks with additional challenges compared to managing voice calls and high-bandwidth Internet traffic.

Cellular networks have emerged as key components of today’s Industrial IoT (IIoT) networks, especially when it comes to long-distance communication with IIoT endpoints that are installed at field sites. Cellular wide-area networks can provide coverage over several miles, and sometimes across countries, as opposed to the limited coverage provided by Wi-Fi networks. However, the typical IIoT application presents cellular networks with additional challenges compared to managing voice calls and high-bandwidth Internet traffic.

Keep reading here.

 

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Week in Review: October 18th to 24th – Standardization

Here we go again, another week in review for our wonderful following (and newcomers!).

This week is all about standardization: AM standards, legal conundrums and a plea for IIoT to get over the myths that have held it back, such as the need for standardization. Airbus has made ULTEM™ 9085 the standard material for components of its A350 XWB aircraft, bolstering a $15 billion material supply contract with Hexcel Corp. In the mean time, 3D printing’s rising potential to disrupt industrial manufacturing is being analyzed with a series of questions that pose product liabilty under a new light.

Let’s have a deeper look.

$15 billion Boost to 3D Printing Companies from Airbus Contract

Airbus have just announced it is standardizing on ULTEM™ 9085 3D printing material for use in the A350 XWB. OPM partners Hexcel Corp were also included in the Airbus announcement with the news of an update to their $15 billion supply contract. Hexcel make a range of advanced materials including composites for aerospace. ULTEM™ 9085 is a high-performance thermoplastic, offering similar possibilities to PEKK.

Read more about it at 3D Printing Industry.

Products Liability in the Digital Age: Legal Issues Generated by Additive Manufacturing

Although products liability laws are slightly different from jurisdiction to jurisdiction, new legal questions are beginning to arise with the advent of additive manufacturing. In the AM context, for the first time courts will need to address the seemingly obvious threshold questions of “What is the Product?” and “Who is the Manufacturer?”. AM also raises interesting questions concerning what specific theories of liability may be available to plaintiffs alleging injury from 3D-printed products.

Read the full article at Inside Counsel.

Busting 3 Industrial Internet of Things myths

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Unlike consumer markets where standardization, formal or by market dominance, is key to success, for IIoT standardization won’t be a concern for decades. For industries wishing to pursue IIoT it is just to accept that for the foreseeable future there won’t be any standards on how to connect up all their things.

Check out this and two other major IIoT myths at Information Age.

 

Remember to follow us on Twitter as we share more news worthy stories on AM, IIoTIndustry 4.0 and more!

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Week in Review: October 11th to 17th

Hello everyone, here we go for another week in review.

This week we take out the big guns as the US army believes that AM is most certainly at the core of it manufacturing future. Along these lines, future nuclear endeavors will need to exploit AM capability to maintain and update current and future facilities in order to keep facilities up to speed. AM is revolutionary per-se but new industry 4.0 standard practices and IIoT know-how can really drive businesses (even whole countries) to better manage resources and plan operations optimally.

 

Additive manufacturing ‘big part’ of Army future, AMC commander says

Army researchers are conducting case studies to optimize the processing parameters for different material depositions using its customized 3-D printer. Researchers like Ricardo Rodriguez hope to someday print large items like a Soldier's helmet with sensing capabilities embedded in hybrid materials, a potential solution they expect to optimize Soldier capabilities while reducing weight.

Take a walk through Best Buy or Microcenter, and you’ll likely find a 3D printer there making some sort of bauble out of extruded plastic. Army leaders say that kind of additive manufacturing technology has a role in the future of Army logistics and supply. “I’m a huge advocate,” said Gen. Gustave Perna, the new commander of Army Materiel Command. “I believe that our two greatest things that we can really make advancement on are robotics and additive manufacturing. I think there is great strength in additive manufacturing.”

Read more about it here.

 

Improving Nuclear Security with Additive Manufacturing

The Pantex Plant, a federal nuclear weapon facility in Amarillo, Texas, has successfully incorporated additive manufacturing into its tooling operations to revolutionize the way the site pursues its critical mission. In a work environment with little room for error, additive manufacturing has delivered a whole new level of precision and consistency that is helping to ensure the safety of workers, the community and the nation.

Read the full article at Machine Design.

 

Northern Germany is going 100% renewable with Industry 4.0 know-how

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As part of the NEW 4.0 project, the states of Hamburg and Schleswig-Holstein have been merged into one consistent energy region to serve as a joint showcase for Germany and demonstrate that a clean-energy transition is feasible. NEW 4.0 aims to prove that a region with 4.5 million residents can be supplied with re-generative energy as early as 2035 by using 100% safe, affordable, and eco-friendly power sources that can lead to a reduction in CO2 emissions by 50 to 70%.

Read about the project and how industry 4.0 fits here.

 

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Week in Review: 4th October to 10th – AM Put in Perspective

Here we go for another Week in Review.

Additive manufacturing is more than a production tool with advanced features and mouth-watering opportunities, it is a puzzle block of an international effort to realize the vision of the industry of the future, or Industry 4.0. As such, this week we saw further movements in international cohesion as AM standards become the focus of huge global collectives and more questions arise in the face of new financing and leasing unknowns.

Let’s dig in.

ISO & ASTM International Create Additive Manufacturing Standards Development Structure

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As questions arise and larger companies begin pumping out 3D printed components, the need has been obviously for cohesion. And both the International Organization for Standardization (ISO) and ASTM International have stepped in to take care of business, creating the Additive Manufacturing Standards Development Structure. This will offer a comprehensive and much-needed framework that those involved in both additive manufacturing and 3D printing can use for technical standards.

Read the full article here.

Financing the Fourth Industrial Revolution

Manufacturers are no longer restricted to traditional financing arrangements where they would pay for equipment over time and use their own personnel to monitor and service that equipment. Now a variety of purchase/service hybrid arrangements are available and, says Amos, financial executives are increasingly looking at a “fourth generation” of financing which looks “like a service contract by a service provider to a service user.”

Read more here.

New 3D printed titanium satellite inserts by Atos and Materialise are up to 70% lighter

The part in question is a highly loaded insert that is used as mounting point for big and heavy structures, including panels in satellites. As the companies revealed, a joint team performed a comprehensive study of currently used parts, and reduced their weight: in total, the weight was reduced from 1454 grams to 500 grams – a highly impressive 66 percent reduction. It currently costs about $20K to send a single Kg into orbit – so 3D printing more efficient components could save millions in the aerospace sector.

Read more about it at 3Ders.

 

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Week in Review: September 27th to 3rd October – Production Ready AM

Here we are, another week gone by and there’s lots to talk about in the additive manufacturing world.

There have been many news this week indicating an ever diversifying world of AM and much of them hint at the technology’s present capacity for production-ready manufacturing. A volkswagen collaborator has succesfully replicated through AM a full automobile cylinder block, the core of the engine, Elon Musk announced a very ambitious Mars colonization plan, powered by 3D printed components and now Jabil Circuit Inc. has announced plans to enhance their manufacturing services through AM.

Much to discuss this week, let’s get to it.

 

Robert Hofmann GmbH 3D Prints Production-Ready Cylinder Block for Volkswagen Automobile

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Germany-based automotive company Robert Hofmann GmbH has utilized 3D printing technology to create a fully functional cylinder block for a Volkswagen motor. The block received metallurgic and geometric tests from Volkswagen engineers, who used a computer tomography to check internal geometries, such as the cooling jacket around the cylinder tubes. These tests showed that the 3D printed component had low porosity and smaller distortions and deviations compared to the cast iron part.

Read the full article here.

 

Elon Musk Shows How 3D Printing Powers Mission to Colonize Mars

Inside the Carbon Fiber Fuel Tanks

3D printing is at the core of Elon Musk’s ambitious plan to transport more than a million people to Mars during the next forty to one hundred years. Musk has previously discussed how SpaceX use 3D printing to manufacture their Draco engines. Made from Titanium and Inconel, 3D printing allows SpaceX to significantly reduce the cost of fabrication. Integrated cooling channels in the walls of the rocket engine chamber can be created using 3D printing, a process that would be, “a real pain” using traditional methods.

Learn more about AM role in this at 3DPrintingIndustry.

 

Jabil Circuit, Inc. Offers New Services, Including 3D Printing, Offering Competitive Edge for Clients

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Jabil Circuit Inc. has just announced that they will be enhancing their manufacturing services with Innovation Acceleration Services. As the name would suggest, they are speeding up the process of product development and the path to commercialization.  “We’re developing a complete ecosystem of digital connections to create new business opportunities, improve experiences and deliver added value, from start to finish.” -Bill Muir, COO at Jabil.

Read more about it here.

 

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