Why AM Certifications are so difficult (Authentise Weekly News-In-Review – Week 97)

For AM to take a greater hold on the industries it’s poised to impact, there are certain angles to smooth out and one of those is certifications. Early adopters of additive production such as aerospace and medical are rightly picky about its certifications and the AM community is making sure to have its own record straight. Safety certifications are the highest priority in this regard and Lockheed Martin’s facility in Sunnyvale, California now holds the first UL certified in the world. Govt. bodies are also moving to help a wider audience to stay within standards, like Health Canada’s newest draft guidance on AM medical devices. However, the main reason why certifications are difficult is that AM is still not an exact science. With fast and multi-spectrum monitoring technologies, we are starting to see what happens during the process. However, certain aspects of the physics behind it are full of variables we don’t understand.

Lockheed Martin extends additive manufacturing to key spacecraft components

Lockheed Martin’s Additive Design and Manufacturing Center in Sunnyvale, California, where the company produces military, commercial and civil space technology, attained a comprehensive safety certification.

“We are the first UL certified additive manufacturing facility in the world,” Servando Cuellar, Lockheed Martin Space Systems engineering senior manager, told SpaceNews.

Read more here.

Health Canada Drafts Policies on 3D-Printed Implantable Devices

Health Canada Drafts Policies on 3D-Printed Implantable Devices

 

 

 

 

Health Canada released draft guidance Thursday to aid manufacturers in preparing license applications for implantable medical devices produced by additive manufacturing or 3D-printing. The guidance “represents the first phase of 3D-printing policy in Canada” because Health Canada intends to continuously adapt its policies to emerging issues on the topic “due to the fast-changing technological environment,” the regulator said.

Read the full article here.

High-Speed Cameras Used to Monitor 3D Printing Process

3D printing, particularly laser-powder bed fusion or L-PBF, requires a great deal of monitoring to avoid defects and flaws in the final parts. In a thesis entitled “Process Monitoring for Temporal-Spatial Modeling of Laser Powder Bed Fusion,” a student named Animek Shaurya studies the use of high-speed video cameras for in-situ monitoring of the 3D printing process of nickel alloy 625 to detect meltpool, splatter, and over melting regions to improve the quality of the print.

Read more here.

We’ll be at Formnext in Frankfurt from the 13th to 16th November. Come see us at booth #B30J.

Follow us on Twitter to keep updated on AM & IIoT related news as well as updates to Authentise’s services!

Monitoring 3D prints – more than just a business boost (Authentise Weekly News-In-Review – Week 94)

We at Authentise are champions of the idea that 3D printing data must be exploited anywhere it is to be found. This often times comes from the printers themselves, offering KPIs on successful print rates and more. Yet even more information can come from external monitoring systems, which that can provide you with data from within the process itself. The benefits of running a monitoring system are numerous, from helping you identify, and potentially correct, issues from within the process, to giving an unprecedented look at still little-known physical phenomenons. Metal printing, for example, is still grounds of research, as we try to understand the dynamics of precise powder melting and the behavior of very hot particles. Another example would be to track 3D printed objects, based on the unique printing “signature” of each printer (like vibrational micro-defects), and thus being able to tell which printer produced it.

High-Speed Cameras Used to Monitor 3D Printing Process

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In a thesis entitled “Process Monitoring for Temporal-Spatial Modeling of Laser Powder Bed Fusion,” a student named Animek Shaurya studies the use of high-speed video cameras for in-situ monitoring of the 3D printing process of nickel alloy 625 to detect meltpool, splatter, and over melting regions to improve the quality of the print.

Read more at 3DPrint.com

New NIST method measures 3D polymer processing precisely

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Researchers at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) have demonstrated a novel light-based atomic force microscopy (AFM) technique–sample-coupled-resonance photorheology (SCRPR)–that measures how and where a material’s properties change in real time at the smallest scales during the curing process. […] Surprising the researchers, interest in the NIST technique has extended well beyond the initial 3D printing applications. Companies in the coatings, optics and additive manufacturing fields have reached out, and some are pursuing formal collaborations, NIST researchers say.

Read the rest here.

This is how researchers can now track 3D printed guns, weapons

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According to academics from the University of Buffalo, there is a way to use the ‘fingerprint’ of 3D printers to accurately trace items printed through the machinery, which may include counterfeit goods, guns, and other weaponry.  No in-fill patterns are the same, and this is the key to tracking down a specific printer.

“3D printers are built to be the same. But there are slight variations in their hardware created during the manufacturing process that leads to unique, inevitable and unchangeable patterns in every object they print,” says Wenyao Xu, Ph.D., associate professor of computer science and engineering in UB’s School of Engineering and Applied Sciences and lead author of the study.

Read the full article here.

 

Senvol Developing Machine Learning for US Navy for Additive Manufacturing

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Senvol has publicly announced that it is developing data-driven machine learning AM software for the U.S. Navy’s Office of Naval Research (ONR). Senvol’s software analyzes the relationships between AM process parameters and material performance. ONR’s goal is to use Senvol’s software to assist in developing statistically substantiated material properties in hopes of reducing conventional material characterization and testing that is needed to develop design allowables.

Read more here.

 

We’ll be at Formnext in Frankfurt from the 13th to 16th November. Come see us at booth #B30J.

Follow us on Twitter to keep updated on AM & IIoT related news as well as updates to Authentise’s services!