Traditional design processes don’t work with AM, so it’s changing (Authentise Weekly News-In-Review – Week 81)

We’ve set up our design process to be efficient and reliable for the tools at our disposal, and with 3D printing, it’s about time to shake it up. 3D printing is inherently different from traditional manufacturing techniques and, to explore its true potential, we need to rely on design tools that help us explore new directions. Sandia Labs argues that this technology doesn’t plug easily into established production methodologies, both in terms of speed and how the variables involved impact the parts. The different features of a 3D printed part are a challenge for precision manufacturing lines. Apart from industrial compatibility issues, to see where we can push 3D printing we need to think outside the box. Concepts like 4D manufacturing help us envision what we can achieve with the technology, with parts that react to temperature, light or mechanical changes. This is nothing new in and of itself, but it’s been explored through 3D printing and it’s empowered design capabilities. We are already on the right track to reinvent the design process through smart digital tools, like generative design and quick iterative cycles, and the future looks exciting.

Sandia Labs Focused on Optimizing Design for 3D Printing

3D printing is capable of streamlining both design and production processes, but most designers (and many design tools) aren’t really prepared to take advantage of the design possibilities the technology presents. Traditional design methods applied to additive manufacturing don’t necessarily lead to fully optimized designs. Sandia National Laboratories’ Laboratory Directed Research and Development project hopes to point the industry in the right direction.

According to Sandia, the project focused on “how to put less precise 3D printed parts together with precise tools, taking advantage of the rapid prototyping, design and manufacturing possible with additive manufacturing.”

Read the full article here.

MIT engineers create 3D-printed magnetic shape-shifters

Engineers from MIT have designed soft, 3D-printed structures that can transform their shape “almost instantaneously” with the wave of a magnet. The magnetically manipulated objects are made using a type of 3D-printable ink developed by researchers at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), which has been infused with tiny magnetic particles.

Read the rest here.

Autodesk University: How is Generative Design used Within Additive Manufacturing?

With a keenness to learn more about how design processes can affect AM end-production, 3D Printing Industry attended Autodesk University’s industrial talk entitled “Generative Design: Past, Present, and Future”. This lecture was led by Autodesk’s Principal Technical Consultant Andrew Harris and Allin Groom a Research Engineer at Autodesk.

Read more at 3D Printing Industry.

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Can Data Connectivity Catapult AM Forward? (Authentise Weekly News-In-Review – Week 76)

AM is a manufacturing technology like many other but, unlike most, has numerous variables at play in making the final part. Most are controlled by the initial setup by the lab technician, but after that there is very little that goes in the way of making sure that the best result is achieved. In-print monitoring is crucial yet still hard to apply properly. Techniques like machine learning enable automated pinpointing of potential issues, stopping before precious time and resources are wasted. This will be made possible thanks to a slew of sensors that power computer-vision algorithms. The bandwidth required for these applications will be huge, something that coming 5G networks will be able to support, together with other IIoT applications previously impossible. In the future, self-correcting printers will make AM much more reliable and efficient. There is already so much that the data coming from printers can teach to improve operational performance. At Authentise we have developed smart analytical tools to help you leverage all that data, and are now moving towards letting you control printer directly, with remote and automated tools.

Machine Learning and Metal 3D Printing Combine for Real-Time Process Monitoring Algorithm

Two researchers from the College of Engineering at Carnegie Mellon University (CMU) have figured out how to combine 3D printing and machine learning for real-time process monitoring, a practice which can detect anomalies inside a part while it’s being 3D printed. Their research could one day lead to self-correcting 3D printers.

Read the full story here.

New whitepaper examines smart metrology for additive manufacturing

If factories are to become faster and more flexible, inspection is a bottleneck to overcome, especially in industries where 100% inspection is required. In this new whitepaper by Autodesk and Faro, smart metrology for the additive manufacturing industry. Components made by additive manufacturing technologies (AM) have more variables than machined parts. Faster inspection for additive manufacturing is more challenging because AM processes are not as accurate as cutting metal. Better metrology for AM will help reduce feedstock and costs.

Check out the whitepaper here.

How Will 5G Change Robotics and the IIoT?

As efficient and effective as 4G technology is, it pales in comparison to the faster, more reliable platform of 5G. If the new protocol meets its advertised speeds of 100 gigabits per second, this rates 5G at a speed of 1,000 times faster than 4G. Given the increasing size of datasets, the greater need for real-time data processing and more reliance on large-scale and long-term data storage, it’s easy to see how 5G benefits everyone.

Read the full article here.

 

Follow us on Twitter to keep updated on AM & IIoT related news as well as updates to Authentise’s services!

New design thinking is helping AM reach new heights (Authentise Weekly News-In-Review – Week 75)

AM is a fantastic piece of technology, but sometimes it can only go as far as the design behind it. That’s why, following the rise and promise of 3D printing techniques, new ways of designing by means of CAD and reasoning have been born, and they help boost the capabilities of AM in a number of ways. Take General Motors for example: through a technique called generative design, they are able to procedurally build the volume of a part to better address its functions and operational stresses, while at the same time saving precious weight. In other cases, new materials and design possibilities come together to enable unprecedented applications like, for example, a customized inflatable for future car interiors. With this kind of thinking, we start to see how this new wave of design methodologies is enabling AM processes to actually work. The 3D printed bridges and houses that we often hear about wouldn’t be much of a revolution by 3D printing alone, if not for a smart and optimized design that can make it work and excel.

GM and Autodesk Using Additive Manufacturing for Lighter Vehicles

GM is using Autodesk’s generative design technology and additive manufacturing to fabricate lighter automotive parts; this seat bracket is 40% lighter and 20% stronger than its predecessor. […] It uses cloud computing and AI-based algorithms to rapidly explore multiple permutations of a part design; it can generate hundreds of high-performance, often organic-looking geometric design options based on goals and parameters set by the user.

Read the full article here.

MIT’s 3D-printed inflatables could shape the interiors of cars in the future

Car interiors could morph into different configurations at the flick of a switch, using 3D-printed inflatable structures developed by researchers at the MIT. The Self-Assembly Lab at Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) worked with BMW on the project, called Liquid Printed Pneumatics. The German auto brand wanted to see how the lab’s experimental engineering techniques could help it realize some of the shapeshifting features imagined in its futuristic concept cars.

Keep reading at Dezeen.

Additive Construction: From the 3D-Printed House to the 3D-Printed High-Rise

AM has begun to affect nearly every industry, from healthcare to aerospace, making it possible to create unique geometries with unique properties. One industry where 3D printing’s impact is at an even more nascent stage in construction. There are firms and research groups exploring the use of 3D printing as a building technology, but additive construction is still so young that its exact purpose and benefits remain speculative and unclear. Why, other than for sheer novelty, squeeze concrete out of a nozzle to fabricate a building when you can rely on traditional methods?

Read the full article here.

Follow us on Twitter to keep updated on AM & IIoT related news as well as updates to Authentise’s services!

CES 2017 (Authentise Weekly News-In-Review – Week 02)

Hello and welcome to another edition of News-in-Review!

This week was evidently dominated by one of the biggest shows of the year, CES2017 and with it came a host of awesome additions to AM’s portfolio, as well as our presence in an industrial 3D printing panel!

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Photo courtesy of Adam Jones.

In this edition tagged #CES2017, we present to you new printers and AI powered online AM tools: Autodesk and Titan Robotics team up to enable large build 3D printing with the efficiency of 5 printing heads. a “crazy” printing tech behind Markforged’s new printer allows it to print metal all for $90K and Sculpteo brings AI-powered analysis and evaluation to online metal AM projects.

We got your attention? Let’s go.

CES2017: Really Fast 3D Printing for Large Builds

About a year ago, Autodesk showed off one of the most innovative filament printers in recent memory. Project Escher is your basic Cartesian filament printer, but with a twist: it has five heads. These print heads work together to build large objects very quickly. Autodesk open sourced the design of the Escher, and now it’s made it into commercial production thanks to Titan Robotics. The Cronus, which uses the same software as Project Escher, is big! Each of these gantries is driven by closed-loop servo motors and fancy ball screws, producing a total build volume of 77″x30″x20″.

Read more about it here.

The Markforged Metal X Prints Real Metal Parts

At CES 2017 today Markforged have announced what might be a revolution in 3D printing, a desktop metal 3D printer called the Metal X. […] The secret to bringing 3D metal printing to the desktop is the Atomic Diffusion Additive Manufacturing (ADAM) process. According to the company this creates, “a part using a bound metal powder rod that transforms into a dense metal part in one easy step. Bulk sintering provides crystal growth through all axes giving your parts excellent mechanical properties in all directions.”

Read more about the printer here.

Sculpteo Brings Artificial Intelligence to Metal Additive Manufacturing with Agile Metal Technology

[Sculpteo is] bringing artificial intelligence to metal 3D printing. They just unveiled Agile Metal Technology, an online agent-based system used to help designers and manufacturers analyze and evaluate metal additive manufacturing projects. […] Their new Agile Metal Technology is very versatile, with the ability to automate complex procedures, locate and correct problems, find the “best fit” processes and techniques, and even offer recommendations on how to optimize design elements like lattices and supports.

Read the full article here.

 

That’s is it for this week, be sure to follow us on Twitter to get more juicy news and those that are not included in the News-In-Review!

Why 3D Printing Needs Secure Streaming

This post was co-published with the Autodesk Spark Blog 

Authentise and Autodesk just announced a strategic partnership, which might have left some of you guessing. Why would Spark, the open platform for 3D printing, partner with Authentise, the leading licensing platform for the industry? Hopefully this post makes things clearer.

There’s been a lot of excitement about 3D printing over the last two years. Media outlets are hungry for new use cases, arriving peu-a-peu, niche by niche every other day. Those stories make for nice coverage. But the excitement is based on more: 3D printing has the promise to disrupt supply chains.
A distributed manufacturing future needs more than niches – it demands designs every part, ever made. Secure streaming can help get us there by reassuring rights holders that engaging with the technology is safe, easy and reliable. This brings a whole new class of content owners to the industry – those who own most of the world’s designs.
 
The massive injection of of high quality data can catapult the industry to new heights. It helps break a vicious cycle that’s currently delaying the industry. Without these designs, we’ll continue to niche by niche, depressing use cases, and as a result printer sales which drive industry revenue and R&D, which leads to reduced use cases again, and as a result less printer sales.
Samir Hanna, VP of Autodesk’s Consumer group, said that, “as 3D printing becomes more widely adopted by both corporations and consumers alike, protecting intellectual property is more important than ever.”
Streaming can be a boon for everybody: It can make printing safer and better at the same time. Certainly that’s what the partnership between Authentise and Autodesk aims to do. We’re delighted to be shaping the 3D printing future together.
 

Authentise and Autodesk Announce Strategic Partnership, Boost Distributed Manufacturing

Partnership Gives Corporations the Tools They Need to Engage in 3D Printing

San Francisco, 30/10/2013 – Authentise, the leading licensing platform for digital manufacturing, and Autodesk Inc., a leader in design software and 3D printing applications, announced a strategic partnership today at the Autodesk Pier 9 Workshop in San Francisco. The companies will integrate features of their respective software, allowing the world’s biggest brands to securely offer their designs for 3D print.

Autodesk has evolved from being a pioneer of design software to a leader in digital manufacturing applications and 3D printing. Earlier this year the company announced their Spark platform that will make 3D printing simpler and more reliable. The platform is the industry’s first open 3D printing platform. By integrating Authentise’s secure streaming technology in the Spark platform, Autodesk can propel its adoption by brands, manufacturers and other design owners concerned about the integrity of their intellectual property.

Authentise optimizes and securely streams designs directly to printers, giving design owners and marketplaces the freedom to distribute their content securely. As physical supply chains turn digital, streaming tools are required to reassure rights holders and unlock the full potential for 3D printing. Authentise’s streaming API is the standard way to address these intellectual property concerns. This partnership cements this claim while simultaneously providing Authentise’s customers with early, integrated access to many of Spark’s tools that make 3D printing more reliable.

“Authentise understands the needs at the frontier of 3D printing thanks to the ground-breaking 3D printing pilots built by its service team for Fortune 100s,” commented Andre Wegner, CEO of Authentise. “The combination of Autodesk’s and Authentise’s tools is a powerful start to addressing these challenges, and we are excited to collaborate on additional development to make distributed manufacturing a global reality.”

“As 3D printing becomes more widely adopted by both corporations and consumers alike, protecting intellectual property is more important than ever,” said Samir Hanna, general manager and vice president, 3D Printing at Autodesk. “Autodesk and Authentise are working together to incorporate IP protection as a standard feature in the 3D printing process.”

 

This got covered in a variety of sources. for instance by 3D Printing Industry. Check out our press page for more info.