Data is king: what to expect from AMUG (Authentise Weekly News-In-Review – #115)

AMUG is here! We’re in the Expo at booth B37, come to say hi to our team!

Although not all AM companies have already revealed their cards right from the get-go, we already have a feeling for what is going to be a strong trend at this year’s user group event: data. Hardware has come to the point where optimizations need to happen elsewhere to see true production AM come to fruition. That means using smart frameworks and analytical software to iron out the deficiencies, making AM into a reliable production tool. Identifying defects before printing ever happens is key to minimize time and material loss. A collaboration between AlphaSTAR & Raytheon has created a workflow for the qualification of missile parts, thus not only perfecting the manufacturing process but also guaranteeing a part that is up to industry standards. We at Authentise have very recently announced a partnership with Microsoft to enable intuitive automations from within their Flow platform, further enhancing the power of our customer’s digital thread. Our guess is that it’s not the last we’ll hear of movement in data strategies from the event. Big players are investing more and more into machine learning and AI projects to get new insights into their operations and potential new avenues for innovation.

AlphaSTAR & Raytheon to present ‘Qualification of an AM Missile’ at AMUG 2019

[…] AlphaSTAR Corporation and Raytheon have cooperated on a project to predict the Additive Manufacturing Process and Service Loading of an as-built additively manufactured part. Using an ICMSE framework, and feeding through a building block Verification, Validation and Accreditation (VVA), the teams set out with the goal of identifying part issues before building the component, thus saving time, lowering risk and reducing scrap rate.

Read the full article at Metal AM.

Authentise Empowers Manufacturing Operators through Collaboration with Microsoft

Active Flow

Authentise has agreed to a multi-year collaboration with Microsoft to utilize Microsoft Azure and integrate Authentise’s workflow management system into Microsoft Flow. The integration with Flow, which goes live this week on the Microsoft Flow Gallery, gives operators directly involved in additive manufacturing quoting, production and analytics processes the opportunity to create their own automations without any coding knowledge.

Read the full press release here.

McDonald’s Bites On Big Data With $300 Million Acquisition

McDonald’s is set to announce that it has reached an agreement to acquire Dynamic Yield, a startup based in Tel Aviv that provides retailers with algorithmically driven “decision logic” technology. When you add an item to an online shopping cart, it’s the tech that nudges you about what other customers bought as well.

Read the full article on Wired.

 

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Authentise Empowers Manufacturing Operators through Collaboration with Microsoft

Active Flow

Collaboration puts Manufacturing Execution Systems in the cloud and makes digital automations available to all those on the front lines of additive production.

Philadelphia, PA, 28 March 2019 – Authentise (www.authentise.com), a leader in data-driven workflow tools for additive manufacturing, has agreed to a multi-year collaboration with Microsoft to utilize Microsoft Azure and integrate Authentise’s workflow management system into Microsoft Flow (flow.microsoft.com).

The integration with Flow, which goes live this week on the Microsoft Flow Gallery, gives operators directly involved in additive manufacturing quoting, production and analytics processes the opportunity to create their own automations without any coding knowledge. Flow allows them to connect Authentise’s data with third-party applications such as Microsoft Office 365, Quickbooks, text messaging, email and more, simply by dragging and dropping the operations into place. In doing so they can create custom alerts, dashboards, and other workflow automations to further increase transparency and efficiency in their additive manufacturing operations.

“We’re delighted to be working with Microsoft to put power into the hands of operators,” says Andre Wegner, CEO of Authentise. “Our work has shown us how creative those involved with additive production are, and how that ingenuity is often stifled within their operations. Yet, there are many ways in which they could improve their daily operations with zero risks. Thanks to this collaboration, we are giving the power to make those changes to anyone, no matter their background.”

“Danfoss’ additive operations have quadrupled over the last year,” reports Werner Stapela, Global Head of Additive Design & Manufacturing at Danfoss. “Working with Authentise has helped us manage that workload, but every operator has slightly different requirements and preferences. Giving individuals within any part of the additive workflow the opportunity to craft their own automations is the only way to ensure that the production processes is working as smoothly as possible. We’re delighted that Authentise and Microsoft have recognized this and are providing our staff with the necessary tools and integrations.”

In addition to the integration with Flow, Authentise is also switching its existing customers to Azure.

“Microsoft is pleased to help Authentise empower manufacturing workers by enabling them to create their own business workflows on the Microsoft cloud,” says Diego Tamburini, Principal Manufacturing Industry Lead for Cloud Commercial Communities at Microsoft. “By adding manufacturing-specific connectors to the Microsoft Flow gallery, Authentise is unlocking the workers’ creativity so they can improve the efficiency of their own work. With 54 regions across the globe delivering services to 140 countries, Microsoft Azure is uniquely positioned to help manufacturers meet their compliance obligations including ITAR and GDPR. While Manufacturers may have once shied away from the cloud, they are no longer doing so.”

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For information, please contact:

Andre Wegner, CEO Authentise, andre@authentise.com, +1-650-861-7077

The Authentise CEO published a background essay on the subject: Enabling Operator Driven Automation

Authentise delivers data-driven process automation software for the additive industry. It’s two products include the Additive Accelerator, a workflow management engine connected to additive machine data, and 3Diax, a platform of additive manufacturing related software modules. These tools now help some of the most exciting companies involved in additive R&D, prototyping and production to reduce effort and cost, improve traceability and transparency and deliver quality. Authentise was founded 2012 at Singularity University in California. More information is available on www.authentise.com. Visit Authentise at AMUG, Booth 37.

Media:

What’s our automated future going to look like? (Authentise Weekly News-In-Review – #113)

Automation is being touted as both a miracle of efficiencies and savings and a scourge on manual workers and users’ safety. There isn’t one definitive way to look at the trend other than to accept the fact that it’s coming. Should we be afraid of it? No. As we mentioned, automation is already bringing incredible tools to factories and production pipelines across the world. Coupling capable robots with intelligent sensors’ networks is a sure recipe for a future of abundance (quoting Peter Diamandis). Think your one-day delivery (or 2h if in NY and other few cities) is a stunning achievement? It’s hard to envision a world where robots of all shapes and sizes automate the shipping process to a degree where we might equate the accessibility of products to the streaming of Netflix movies, but that’s already in the works. It’s coming, however we’re not quite there yet. Automated cars might look sophisticated in Google’s or Waymio’s marketing runs, but it’s a very complicated system of variables. 3D printing is helping make these self-driving cabs sturdier than ever, but a release is still off in the distance. Another common fear is that technologies like these will take away jobs from a good portion of the population. However, we must take into account that technology is inventing entirely new jobs along the way of making old ones obsolete. Automation is about making your life easier and more pleasurable. We recently announced the release of our mobile app designed towards digitizing the tracking of post-processing steps in AM. With the time saved from manually reporting on production stages, operators can act on more engaging activities.

Free Shipping

Amazon has imagined a system that sends a robot out from each house to meet a delivery truck. Industry predictions suggest that robots could eventually be able to grasp and move objects within a household — one potential example, a towel-folding robot, has already been exhibited as a prototype. By the time that delivery robots begin arriving at your home, your residence might already be operating as an automated warehouse in its own right.

Read the full story here.

Local Motors Wants To Prove 3D-Printed Self-Driving Shuttles Are Self

Screen Shot 2019-03-17 at 9.25.17 PM

Local Motors has been working on 3D-printed vehicles for around five years. We were first introduced to the company when it showed off a working 3D-printed car at the 2015 Detroit Auto Show. Since then, the company has tested over 2,000 combinations of printing material and fortifying additives, and it can print an entire Olli in roughly 10 hours (down from 44 hours in 2014). Now, Rogers says, the tech has matured to the point that it’s time for the company to start showing off the progress it’s made.

Read the rest here.

Former Google Exec: AI Will Replace 40% Of Jobs In 15 Years

AI, whether it’s an application of machine learning or some new technology altogether, is poised to shatter the global economy.

Kai-Fu Lee, a venture capitalist who used to develop artificial intelligence for both Microsoft and Google, told CBS’ 60 Minutes that AI will displace 40% of the world’s workers within 15 years.

“I believe [AI] is going to change the world more than anything in the history of mankind,” Lee told CBS. “More than electricity.”

Read the full article here.

 

 

We are going to exhibit at AMUG! Come visit us at booth #37 from March 31st – April 4th.

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Automation and the human dilemma (Authentise Weekly News-In-Review – Week 99)

Automation is a buzzword that’s more often than not associated with negative press. After all, it is eroding the job market for an increasing number of manual jobs. How is the human going to cope with a rising automated workplace? The picture doesn’t seem that straighforward though. The question in itself is in doubt when studies show that the shift is adding new jobs for the skilled workforce, alongside a rise in wages. Furthermore, automation is tackling those jobs that are repetitive, menial and reward-less. At the same time, we seem to not fully understand the scope of change that is about to hit us in the very near future and, in turn, are not prepared for it. Our society will need to adapt to new ways of getting things done. Data is king and AI systems will be unmatched. We humans must find a way to collaborate with this societal shift, bringing the best of what humans can do in a world dominated by robots.

Industrial robots increase wages for employees

Industrial robots increase wages for employees

In addition to increasing productivity, the introduction of industrial robots has increased wages for the employees. At the same time, industrial robots have also changed the labor market by increasing the number of job opportunities for highly skilled employees, while opportunities for low-skilled employees are declining.

Read more at Phys.org

Are We Mature Enough To Deal With The Dilemmas Of Automation?

We have no choice but to address the challenge of how our societies are going to evolve, how we are going to reinvent ourselves when we free ourselves from so many boring or demeaning tasks and which models are appropriate for a society in which the eight-hour (or longer) working day is as outdated as the manual labor our forefathers endured. The dilemmas of automation require a new way of thinking: the technology exists, the question is whether we have the vision to adopt it. In short, the problem isn’t technology per se, it’s about adapting our society to make the best use of it. And I’m not sure we have the maturity yet to do so.

Read the full article here.

Learn to love robots, automation and artificial intelligence

Innovation expert Charles Leadbeater says people should not be frightened by AI’s rise. For him, the danger of AI is that we’ll become more like second-rate robots. He believes education needs to produce first-rate humans, able to work with robots.

 

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America Makes TRX Webinar

We will be holding a webinar through America Makes TRX series titled “Data-Driven Process Automation for R&D, Prototyping, and Manufacturing“. Participate to better understand how data can boost your business’s performance!
When: 17th of October – 2:00 pm – 3:00 pm ET

Where: CLICK HERE to register!

Newsletter (July) – The new face of Run automation

Improved tools for better print automation

 

We know that there are a lot of opportunities to use data to improve the scheduling workflow in additive manufacturing. We’ve known it since we started.

Now we’re taking the new steps towards that promise.

The first step is to make it easier to select parts. We know what needs to be manufactured, and pretty much everything about it.
That we should be able to pre-select and even sort the parts that need to be manufactured based on the device you’re targeting.
So, in the next week, we’ll be releasing our new run/build page.

RunBuild Page

It’ll let you filter the parts’ list based on the machine that you’ve selected, and default sorts them by “Due Date”. Now all you’ve got to do is to select the parts you want to make, and we’ll make sure they’re properly nested (2D, 3D coming soon), tell you when it’s likely to start, how long it’ll take and how much room you have.

To learn more about our Additive Production Accelerator (APA) and how it can help boost your business, visit our website.

The Road Ahead

That’s just the start. We also wanted to take some time to outline the road ahead. Two improvements that we have squarely in view are:
  • Auto-nesting – We’re working on the ability to give you the most efficient builds based on your part backlog. Since good nesting/packing is usually driven by the computing resources/time available, making a selection and then packing is not the way to go. Instead, our multi-threaded packing approach intends to do this in the background, based on all the part’s features (such as material, workflow, due-date, quality requirements etc) that you’ve entered previously, and iterate through thousands of potential variations before you’ve ever logged on. That way, by the time you do, you have a one-click option to get the most efficient build possible.
  • Machine-code creation – As mentioned last month, moving nested builds directly on to the machine is the next step in automating the workflow. We can achieve that by working with the OEMs to create the build on the fly. That’s also a project we are starting this year, and are looking for partners – especially if you have EOS machines.
If you would like to know more about the new run/build page or the upcoming features we will add, please let us know by contacting our CMO Frank Speck at frank@authentise.com.

Automation: going where humans can’t (or don’t want to) (Authentise Weekly News-In-Review – Week 59)

Automation is being employed to solve many of the challenges of the present day. In a sense, it is liberating us humans from menial or even dangerous tasks in favour of more stimulating exercises. For example, putting your life in the possibly dangerous environment of an ammunition factory was the only way for poor families to sustain themselves. Robotics and other technologies are not only putting unsafe jobs out of the list, are increasing productivity considerably. There are also societal changes that we are only now starting to foresee. Analyses show that certain dynamics are going to shift as demographic and economic factors evolve. For example, a number of countries with an aging population will need an increase in caregivers. Automation is already bringing to market solutions for human-machine relationship robots to take care of this. This trend is putting under the spotlight how technology is making certain jobs obsolete, inflating the already present preoccupation of joblessness. However, studies conducted by automation technologies show that however permeating these are, humans will not only always be required for complex and open-ended tasks, the new framework brought about by automation will create new jobs, such that never even existed before.

Robots Have Replaced Humans in 25% of China’s Ammunition Factories

Rifle bullets on wood table with low key scene. Close-up photo : Foto stock

Speaking with the South China Morning Post (SCMP), Xu Zhigang, a researcher with the Chinese Academy of Sciences’ Shenyang Institute of Automation, said that nearly 25% of China’s ammunition factories have had their human workers replaced with “smart machines.” Interestingly enough, China didn’t turn to AI simply because it wants to lead AI adoption. It was instead because the factories were lacking in people who actually wanted to work in such dangerous environments.

Keep reading here.

Can Robots Tighten the Bolts on a Rickety Caregiver Sector?

Can Robots Tighten the Bolts on a Rickety Caregiver Sector?

In 15 years, the percentage of the population over 65 will more than double in Europe, Japan and the U.S. A tenfold increase in care workers will be required, at a time when the sector is relentlessly shrinking. At first glance, this could be a perfect opportunity for robots to fill a genuine social need—entrepreneurs and tech evangelists frequently talk of machines tackling the “dangerous and demeaning work” of carrying and cleaning patients.

Read the full article here.

Could Self-Driving Trucks Be Good for Truckers?

White tractor-trailers

Uber does not believe that self-driving trucks will be doing “dock to dock” runs for a very long time. They see a future in which self-driving trucks drive highway miles between what they call transfer hubs, where human drivers will take over for the last miles through complex urban and industrial terrain. […] Basically, if the self-driving trucks are used far more efficiently, it would drive down the cost of freight, which would stimulate demand, leading to more business. And, if more freight is out on the roads, and humans are required to run it around local areas, then there will be a greater, not lesser, need for truck drivers.

“If you believe the [automation] narrative that’s out there today, it is especially counterintuitive,”Alden Woodrow, the product lead for self-driving trucks at Uber, says, “because the more self-driving trucks you have and the higher utilization they have, the more jobs it creates.”

Read the full article in the Atlantic.

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Automation is coming for our jobs: are we ready? (Authentise Weekly News-In-Review – Week 54)

Automation is a process that’s being on-going for the past 40 years to take ever more complex tasks and have machines take over. This means that a lot of manual, repetitive tasks have been handed over to robotic arms and minds, freeing the humans to do something more elevated, and possible more stimulating. This will constitute a monumental impact on society, with as many as 800 million workers projected to be displaced by 2030. Nonetheless, there are a few key issues in the way of that vision: skill gaps make it hard to change careers, our social systems aren’t suited to support workers through these new shifts and this phenomenon could accentuate present issues that we are pressing to eliminate, like gender and racial discrimination in the form of pay gaps. For its promises of utmost freedom, there are a few angles to iron out before it becomes reality, creating a suitable environment to guarantee innovation and social welfare (like Sweden!).

Automation Could Displace 800 Million Workers Worldwide By 2030, Study Says

A coming wave of job automation could force between 400 million and 800 million people worldwide out of a job in the next 13 years, according to a new study. A report released this week from the research arm of the consulting firm McKinsey & Company forecasts scenarios in which 3 percent to 14 percent of workers around the world — in 75 million to 375 million jobs — will have to acquire new skills and switch occupations by 2030.

“There are few precedents” to the challenge of retraining hundreds of millions of workers in the middle of their careers, the report’s authors say.

Read the full article here.

How Robots Could Make the Gender Pay Gap Even Worse

A new report published Thursday suggests that robots could make the gender pay gap even worse, stoking existing fears and uncertainty around the concept of automation. In a paper titled “Managing automation Employment, inequality and ethics in the digital age,” the Institute for Public Policy Research argued that a greater share of jobs that women hold—46.8% versus 40.9% for men—have the technical potential to be automated since female workers are more likely to hold low-skill “automatable” occupations. Paired with women’s underrepresentation in high-skill occupations that may be complemented by technology, that means that automation could exacerbate gender inequality.

Read more here.

The Robots Are Coming, and Sweden Is Fine

Capture copy

Sweden’s famously generous social welfare system makes this a place not prone to fretting about automation — or much else, for that matter.

Mr. Persson, 35, sits in front of four computer screens, one displaying the loader he steers as it lifts freshly blasted rock containing silver, zinc and lead. […] He is cognizant that robots are evolving by the day. Boliden is testing self-driving vehicles to replace truck drivers. But Mr. Persson assumes people will always be needed to keep the machines running. He has faith in the Swedish economic model and its protections against the torment of joblessness.

“I’m not really worried,” he says. “There are so many jobs in this mine that even if this job disappears, they will have another one. The company will take care of us.”

 

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Autonomous robots: its more than just driving (Authentise Weekly News-In-Review – Week 50)

When you say autonomous one most commonly thinks of self-driving cars. Nonetheless, the movement to make robots survey and act on their own precedes driving around no-hands. Autonomous robots have the ability to adapt to various scenarios within their scope of purpose and, as such, are being developed for a host of different applications. What is largely proceeding out of the spotlight is an ever-increasing presence within plants and other work environments of robots that are providing the tendrils for the factory-wide brain of the IIoT. These robots can sense their environment, be in constant and instantaneous exchange of information with central processing systems and execute complex directives, managing the necessary sub-steps on their own. Adidas has created a factory that uses autonomous robots to drive on-demand sneaker production. Menial tasks can be done effortlessly and efficiently by robots that, through machine vision, can see and analyze their targets and act according to their AI directives. This is why Château Clerc Milon, renowned wine producer, has implemented robots to take care of vineyards. Autonomous robots are perfect for scenarios in which unfaltering machine vision and pattern recognition enable them to see what the human eye wouldn’t catch. Like for rediscovering long-lost ’50s prototype jet fighters out in the ocean.

Inside Adidas’ Robot-Powered, On-Demand Sneaker Factory

Called Speedfactory, the facility would pair a small human workforce with technologies including 3-D printing, robotic arms, and computerized knitting to make running shoes—items that are more typically mass-produced by workers in far-off countries like China, Indonesia, and Vietnam.

“What we enable is speed,” said Gerd Manz, vice president of Adidas’ innovation group. “We can react to consumer needs within days.”

Read the full article at Wired.

Bordeaux: Robot vineyard worker impresses at Clerc Milon

robot vineyard worker

Château Clerc Milon, under the same ownership as Château Mouton Rothschild in Pauillac, has tested a prototype vineyard robot named ‘Ted’ to help with soil cultivation and weeding in its vines.

Baron Philippe de Rothschild’s MD, Philippe Dhalluin, said, ‘We see robotics as an effective solution for the future.

‘As well as helping to make our vineyard work less arduous and respecting the soil, it will reduce our dependency on fossil energies and the harm caused by traditional agricultural machinery.’

Read more here.

Autonomous sub finds long-lost supersonic aircraft from the 50s

The "Raise the Arrow" team gathers for a photo behind the AUV

Fraunhofer is reporting that one of its DEDAVEs [unmanned submersible] has located a couple of sunken flight models of a famous Canadian jet fighter, the Avro Arrow. Billed as “the world’s first autonomous underwater vehicle [AUV] to be developed from the outset with a view to series production,” the DEDAVE is designed to be easily manufactured on an assembly line, and thus relatively inexpensive to buy. At less than 700 kg it’s also quite light for an AUV and can travel autonomously for up to 20 hours on one charge of its eight batteries, diving to a maximum depth of 6,000 meters.

Read more about the discovery here.

 

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Automation: adapt or disrupt? (Authentise Weekly News-In-Review – Week 49)

Automation technologies are starting to take hold in many environments of our daily lives. It’s not just the factory floor, the whole world is getting permeated by tech that makes short work of menial tasks. But how is this changing the way we think about these spaces? The factories of the future are often envisioned as highly technical spaces, with every nook and cranny tailored to the task at hand, aimed at making it easiest for the robots in place to do their jobs. However, most advanced automation technologies at our disposal are capable of navigating complex environments, react according to outside stimuli and thus safely traverse almost any workspace they find themselves in. Cobots (collaborative robots), autonomous vehicles or even Amazon warehouse handling and dispatch robots are perfect examples of this. The interesting dichotomy here is in how we can optimally plan spaces, public, private or industrial, to drive performance and flexibility. Does flexibility go in the way of peak performance layout? Or are intelligent, adaptable systems going to be the best option to keep operations agile?

 

The checkout line’s death knell


We’re all only about ten years away from sauntering into stores, grabbing whatever it is we want, then quick-stepping out like we stole it. It’ll be possible because many shops will be ringed with machine vision-enabling cameras and sensors that keep tabs on what you take while inside and then charge it to the corresponding app as you leave.

Read the full article (and watch the great video!) here.

 

Walmart is ‘secretly’ testing self-driving floor scrubbers, signaling that more robots are coming

floors scr

Walmart has been quietly testing out autonomous floor scrubbers during the overnight shifts in five store locations near the company’s headquarters in Bentonville, Arkansas. A spokesperson for Walmart told FOX Business that the move, which was first reported by LinkedIn, is a “very small proof of concept pilot that we are running” and that the company still has a lot more to learn about how this technology “might work best in our different retail locations.”

Read the full article here.

 

Cities Should Not Design for Autonomous Vehicles

Autonomous cars are likely to be better off relying on each other than on fixed infrastructure. As autonomous vehicles capture a larger share of road traffic, they will be able to crowdsource extremely-detailed, real-time maps of urban roads. Each member of the network will benefit from the information provided by other vehicles and would likely provide its own data in exchange for access.

Read the full article here.

 

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