Bespoke solutions to today’s problems (Authentise Weekly News-In-Review – #133)

3D printing gives companies access to a variety of features previously extremely hard to get or even impossible. One of the most exciting ones comes from its intrinsic manufacturing agility. 3D printing not only enables custom-made product manufacturing, it opened Pandora’s box of possibilities in bespoke solutions to our present and future challenges. Scan-based 3D printed helmets are the tip of the iceberg of where we can push this concept. Patient-specific medical implants and bioprinting are already being developed to address and further reduce rejection and failure rates. The path ahead is brimming with possibilities, of AI-driven 3D printing robots, applying their smarts to repairing failing infrastructures or even coral reefs with bespoke 3D printing solutions. This and much more will make traditional manufacturing terribly limiting and singleminded.

Custom 3D Printed HEXR Cycling Helmets Are Now Shipping To Customers

3D printed Hexo helmets. Photo via Hexo Helmet.

HEXR helmets, the custom 3D printed bicycle helmets formerly known as HEXO, has now begun shipping to customers. […] The HEXR helmet features a 3D printed honeycomb core, produced using SLS 3D printing technology and Polyamide 11 from leading industrial 3D printer manufacturer EOS. Each helmet is 3D printed according to the measurements of the user, acquired through a 3D scanning app, in order to create a lightweight and protective headgear solution catered to the customer.

Read more on 3D Printing Industry.

 

3D printing could meet rising demand for heart valves

artificial heart valves

If Swiss researchers have their way, artificial heart valves could simply come out of 3D printers in future. Switzerland’s Federal Institute of Technology (ETHZ), along with South African company Straight Access Technologies (SAT) has developed a silicone replacement for the heart valves used today. However, it will take at least ten years before the custom-made artificial heart valves can be used. Experts expect that in the coming decades the demand for artificial heart valves will increase sharply in large parts of the world. This is due to aging, lack of exercise and poor nutrition. Replacement heart valves from the 3D printer could help meet this demand.

Read the full article at Swissinfo.

 

GXN proposes underwater 3D printers to repair the cracks in our planet

GXN proposes underwater 3D printers to repair the cracks in our planet

GXN innovation has unveiled research that suggests using autonomous, robotic 3D printers to fix the cracks in the infrastructure of our planet. its proposal ‘break the grid’ imagines a near future where global challenges such as damaged coral reefs and the thermal envelopes of high-rises are fixed with such devices.

‘freeing 3D printers to meet these challenges could be a revolution in the making,’ says Kasper Jensen, founder of GXN. ‘by enabling 3D printing robots to crawl, swim, and fly, we can address pressing environmental threats around the world at lower cost and with greater efficiency.’

Read more at Designboom.

 

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What’s our automated future going to look like? (Authentise Weekly News-In-Review – #113)

Automation is being touted as both a miracle of efficiencies and savings and a scourge on manual workers and users’ safety. There isn’t one definitive way to look at the trend other than to accept the fact that it’s coming. Should we be afraid of it? No. As we mentioned, automation is already bringing incredible tools to factories and production pipelines across the world. Coupling capable robots with intelligent sensors’ networks is a sure recipe for a future of abundance (quoting Peter Diamandis). Think your one-day delivery (or 2h if in NY and other few cities) is a stunning achievement? It’s hard to envision a world where robots of all shapes and sizes automate the shipping process to a degree where we might equate the accessibility of products to the streaming of Netflix movies, but that’s already in the works. It’s coming, however we’re not quite there yet. Automated cars might look sophisticated in Google’s or Waymio’s marketing runs, but it’s a very complicated system of variables. 3D printing is helping make these self-driving cabs sturdier than ever, but a release is still off in the distance. Another common fear is that technologies like these will take away jobs from a good portion of the population. However, we must take into account that technology is inventing entirely new jobs along the way of making old ones obsolete. Automation is about making your life easier and more pleasurable. We recently announced the release of our mobile app designed towards digitizing the tracking of post-processing steps in AM. With the time saved from manually reporting on production stages, operators can act on more engaging activities.

Free Shipping

Amazon has imagined a system that sends a robot out from each house to meet a delivery truck. Industry predictions suggest that robots could eventually be able to grasp and move objects within a household — one potential example, a towel-folding robot, has already been exhibited as a prototype. By the time that delivery robots begin arriving at your home, your residence might already be operating as an automated warehouse in its own right.

Read the full story here.

Local Motors Wants To Prove 3D-Printed Self-Driving Shuttles Are Self

Screen Shot 2019-03-17 at 9.25.17 PM

Local Motors has been working on 3D-printed vehicles for around five years. We were first introduced to the company when it showed off a working 3D-printed car at the 2015 Detroit Auto Show. Since then, the company has tested over 2,000 combinations of printing material and fortifying additives, and it can print an entire Olli in roughly 10 hours (down from 44 hours in 2014). Now, Rogers says, the tech has matured to the point that it’s time for the company to start showing off the progress it’s made.

Read the rest here.

Former Google Exec: AI Will Replace 40% Of Jobs In 15 Years

AI, whether it’s an application of machine learning or some new technology altogether, is poised to shatter the global economy.

Kai-Fu Lee, a venture capitalist who used to develop artificial intelligence for both Microsoft and Google, told CBS’ 60 Minutes that AI will displace 40% of the world’s workers within 15 years.

“I believe [AI] is going to change the world more than anything in the history of mankind,” Lee told CBS. “More than electricity.”

Read the full article here.

 

 

We are going to exhibit at AMUG! Come visit us at booth #37 from March 31st – April 4th.

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Our Autonomous, Decentralized Future (Authentise Weekly News-In-Review – Week 19)

Ever since the first applications in the Ford automotive pipeline, industrial automation has taken giant steps in assuring a both voluminous and efficient production process. Nonetheless, the centralized framework on which it has thrived does no longer provide an optimal economy for today’s hyper-connected society and infrastructure. Highly automated systems are being put in place to intelligently tackle manufacturing issues, capable of addressing objectives in a decentralized manner. IIoT is a prime example of this, where edge computing combines data collection, analysis and action outside the realm of influence of a central authority. An open source framework, coupled with a mix of microservices is a sound answer to what the future of industrial automation might be. Similarly, AM’s flexible nature is making it possible to rethink manufacturing operations. Small, low-cost machines can work autonomously and in parallel in order to manage various production orders intelligently. Even more farsightedly, Siemens envisions swarms of 3D printing robots capable of subdividing bigger prints into smaller units, working in-situ.

The Move to a Common Open IoT Framework

Loosely-Coupled Microservice Platform Architecture. Source: EdgeX Foundry

In order for the [IIoT] to truly take off, connecting devices to the cloud—or on the edge of the network— needs to be fast, easy and affordable. It is also important that the suppliers of automation technology embrace open standards so that these “things” are interoperable. […] This week, Opto 22 takes its commitment to open standards a step further with the announcement that it has joined The Linux Foundation as a silver level member. According to Opto 22, this strategic move is the company doing its part to “spearhead the adoption of open-source technology in the industrial automation and process control industries, and accelerate the rollout of Industrial Internet of Things application.”

Read more at Automation World.

Markforged plans large-scale digital metal manufacturing with 3D print farms

Sintering multiple 17-4 Stainless Steel Sprockets. Image via Markforged.

The future of metal 3D printing is in print farms says Markforged CEO, Greg Mark. While a number of companies are attempting to create machinery capable of industrial metal 3D printing, Greg Mark believes these “large-format metal printers will be replaced by smaller, low-cost machines working in parallel – print-farms.”

3D metal print-farms will shorten development time, closing the gap between prototyping and production.

Markforged intends to develop a system that allows for rapid production of strong metal parts. For Markforged, farming is the solution for large scale metal 3D printing production. Currently, 3D printing farms are mainly working with plastics.

Read more of their AM farm plans here.

Siemens Contemplating “Swarm” 3D Printing?

Siemens’ experimental production robot.

A report on Forbes details work undertaken by Siemens to develop a “mobile robotic 3D printer” concept. The curious-looking small robot was developed last year and since then has served as an experimental platform for developing software for future production use.

[…] some day, the same software that is helping the robotic spiders crawl the floor while avoiding obstacles and keeping their printing parts in balance could enable whole new systems of factory work – on tasks much more complex than assembling handheld toys.

For example, a team of robots could work together on a new kind of fuselage cylinder for airplanes. If each robot could attack the job from a different angle, they might build complex shapes together that no single printer could create by itself.

Read more about Siemens undertaking here.

 

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