Go Big or Go Home (Authentise Weekly News-In-Review – Week 16)

AM has matured into a fully fledged industrial manufacturing technology. As its materials, processes and applications broaden the jump to full-scale implementation is getting more and more a feasible possibility. The potential to disrupt various industries is being recognized by nations all over the globe: South Korea is one such nation at the forefront of innovation and it has decided to invest 41.2 billion won (Approx. $37 million USD) to foster the development of AM as a key innovation technology. Adidas, on the other hand, seems ready to tackle the stagnating idea that 3D printing is “all hype”. It announced that its concept shoe Futurecraft 4D is ready to be mass-produced as early as 2018, proof that the technology is more than capable to sustain its reputation as a manufacturing game-changer. This is surely shaping up to be the year of the “Go Big or Go Home” mantra, for AM and other important trends. For example in IIoT, where  Ubicquia wants to apply its concept on a city-scale.

South Korea to develop nation’s 3D printing industry with investment of over 41 billion won

Central district district of South Korea's capital city Seoul, viewed from Mt. Namsan. Photo by zuk0 on Flickr

The Ministry of Science, ICT and Future Planning in South Korea has announced it will be spending 41.2 billion won (Approx. $37 million USD) of 2017’s annual budget to encourage the development of 3D printing across the nation. Kang Seong-joo, an official from the ministry, says: “The 3D printing industry is the core technology that will bring about innovation in the manufacturing realm and create a new market by changing the paradigm of the industry. It is important for ministries to cooperate to actively deal with the fast-changing global trend.”

Read more here.

Adidas Futurecraft 4D starts a new era of 3D-printed shoes

Capture

Adidas is back with another sneaker based on a 3D-printed midsole, but this time the company says it’s moving even closer to mass production. The Futurecraft 4D shoe will be the first one using Carbon‘s “Digital Light Synthesis” process. The Silicon Valley company’s tech creates 3D items by blasting liquid with light, which Adidas says will allow it to operate on “a completely different manufacturing scale.” […] its plan to scale up projects more than 100,000 pairs made with the Digital Light Synthesis method by the end of 2018.

Read the full article at Engadget.

Revolutionizing the IIoT Industry One Streetlight at a Time

Sao Paulo industrial IoT Kairo Ubicquia

When Zimmerman [co-founder and chief technology officer of Ubicquia, an Industrial Internet of Things (IIoT) provider] recognized that a light pole could potentially solve all three of those challenges [power, networking and cost], the idea for Kairo began to take form. Over several months, Ubicquia designed and built a wide range of microcontroller boards featuring a variety of sensors and actuators that could be housed in a form factor no larger than a soda can. Kairo empowered sensor and application data to be harnessed by myriad of smart-city applications, delivering improved operations and planning, as well as better decision-making by city government.

Read all about Kairo at Spectrum.

 

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Big Data to tackle Big Problems (Authentise Weekly News-In-Review – Week 06)

Hi and welcome to another edition of the News-In-Review, brought to you by Authentise!

The computational power at our disposal is increasing exponentially, being that of the phone in our pockets or the super-computer of the country next door. In our interconnected world, data is engulfing everything (as highlighted in our Week 3 edition). This week we propose how the two are coming together to address the great problems in our world, from national resource management to safer and more accurate than ever 3D printing. As IIoT is embedded in the national grid, it’s changing from a rigid, failure prone network to an efficient, system optimized in real time approach thanks to data-driven analytics. Processing that data requires new IT innovations, such as the first exascale super-computer now built in Chian. This, previously unattainable computational power allows us to simulate better 3D printing designs, materials and processes and can be used to unlock more AM use cases, such as construction.

As ever, there’s a lot to cover here. Let’s jump in!

Big Water – Big Data Is Reshaping The Water Industry

Data management, exploratory analytics, data visualization and predictive algorithms enable the discovery of important behavioral characteristics of highly‐complex urban infrastructure. Water management relies on heavy physical infrastructure and reactive administration. This changes with the development of cyber-physical systems, real-time monitoring, big data analysis and predictive machine learning algorithms and the IoT. These systems enable a transition from reacting to optimized, proactive and cost-efficient management processes.

Check out the full article here.

World’s First Exascale Supercomputer to Enhance 3D Printing Capabilities

The Tianhe-2 Super Computer

China’s National Supercomputer Centre announced that the prototype for its exascale supercomputer will be completed later this year, ahead of its initial date in 2018. The successful performance and commercialization of the computer is presumed to drastically improve existing 3D printing or additive manufacturing methods. […] Through the usage of an exascale computing-based application, manufacturers will be able to use additive manufacturing technologies to better simulate end products and significantly optimize processes before the last stage of manufacturing.

Read the full article here.

Building by numbers: how 3D printing is shaking up the construction industry

Stewart Williams [admits] that quality control represents a major challenge [to the building industry]. To be viable, any printed building technique will have systems that can constantly monitor and inspect the materials as they are being produced. As he notes wryly: “You wouldn’t want to build a massive beam and get to the end and find you’ve got some holes in it.” Assuming regulators can be convinced, the potential upsides of 3D printing for the construction industry could be huge. Among the factors in the technology’s favor are productivity gains, reduced labor costs and safer working environments, as well as the sort of one-off, complex building designs that are not technically and economically feasible at present.

Read the whole article at the Guardian.

 

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