The opportunities of 3D printing organic compounds (Authentise Weekly News-In-Review – Week 46)

3D printing is still struggling to overcome issues regarding biodegradability and its ecological impact. We’ve been using materials for thousands of years that are of natural origin and can easily be disposed of. It’s been a challenge to translate that to the latest manufacturing tech around. Cellulose is having a comeback, as researchers are understanding how to create polymer structures from abundant and renewable raw materials. A new group of new biomaterials is being developed, some with transient properties, capable of degrading and dissolving on-demand. Nanocellulose has been invented in the 1970s as a food thickener and could be coming to a dish near you, made more palatable thanks to 3D printing. Advances in chemistry collide with the challenges of 3D printing to open the way for complex, smart and immensely useful organic materials.

MIT Develops Method To 3D Print Abundant Natural Polymer Cellulose

Diagram showing a) printing process b) process under a microscope c) extruded filament d) mini glasses e) mini rose. Image via Advanced Science News.

MIT scientists Dr. Sebastian Pattinson and Prof A.J. Hart have now published a possible method of 3D printing a derivative of cellulose as a substitute for environmentally problematic plastics, one which sidesteps previously encountered problems. […] As detailed in the research paper, after printing, the cellulose acetate parts can be converted to cellulose proper by de-acetylation using sodium hydroxide.

Read the full article here.

3D Printed Biomaterials Degrade on Demand

Biomaterials that can degrade on demand have been 3D printed by engineers at Brown University. The materials were fabricated by means of stereolithographic printing, which uses an ultraviolet laser controlled by a computer-aided design system to trace patterns across the surface of a photoactive polymer solution. The capacity of the materials to degrade is imparted by the development of reversible ionic bonds. Precursor solutions were prepared with sodium alginate, a compound derived from seaweed that is known to be capable of ionic crosslinking. Different combinations of ionic salts, including magnesium, barium and calcium, were then added to 3D print objects with varying stiffness levels, a factor which affected how quickly the structures dissolved.

Read more about the research here.

Can 3D Printed Nanocellulose Transform The Food Industry?

Cellulose is a natural ingredient, but would you necessarily want to eat it? Diagram of the nanocellulose extraction process via bio1151.nicerweb

The Yissum Research Development Company of the Hebrew University of Jerusalem is the latest institution to introduce a nanocellulose-based platform that promises “the 3D printing of personalized food” with the added ability “to cook, bake, fry and grill while printing at the three dimensional space.”

Read the full article here.

 

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We’ll be at Formnext 2017 between the 14th-17th of November! Come check us out at booth Booth # 3.1-A33.

3D printing & the environment: promises and limitations of AM (Authentise Weekly News-In-Review – Week 39)

There are a lot of manufacturing dynamics which 3D printing is upending. It goes beyond design freedom, AM technologies allow us to be a lot more conscious of our footprint on the environment. We are still testing new grounds and so far AM is revealing to be a less wasteful, smarter approach to manufacturing. Not only can we build structures that utilize the barest minimum in terms of material usage, entirely new materials and techniques allow us to tackle the problems of biodegradability and energy consumption. Nonetheless, AM still has a way to go before it can get to the level of manufacturing performance of traditional methods. Laser sintering still requires a great deal of electricity to fuse metal particles, most processes are imprecise by traditional standards and most groundbreaking AM applications are still very much R&D. This point reinforces the fact that AM should cover its role in a broader hybrid manufacturing system, in which the optimal outcome in terms of manufacturing footprint and item accuracy can be achieved. There is no holy grail solution in manufacturing, just an ever expanding toolset to give you the right means to get optimal ends.

3D Printhuset Lays Foundations For 3D Printed Office-Hotel in Copenhagen

A rendering of the finished BOD. Image via: 3D Printhuset.

Building on Demand (BOD), the latest venture of Danish firm 3D Printhuset, marks a major breakthrough for additive manufacturing in construction. The concrete office-hotel structure, occupying just under 50m of floor-space, is due to be 3D printed in Nordhaven, Copenhagen’s docklands area, and will be Western Europe’s first inhabitable 3D printed buildingJakob Jørgensen, Technical Manager at 3D Printhuset, explained in a press release that 3D printing the building over traditional construction meant that “complex forms can be entered at no additional cost”, while Michael Holm, the company’s development manager, emphasized the use of up-cycling and waste reduction in building materials.

Read the full article here.

3D Printed Biomaterials Degrade on Demand

Researchers 3D-printed intricate temporary microstructures that can be degraded on demand using a biocompatible chemical trigger. (Credit: Wong Lab / Brown University)

Biomaterials that can degrade on demand have been 3D printed by engineers at Brown University. The materials were fabricated by means of stereolithographic printing […]. The capacity of the materials to degrade is imparted by the development of reversible ionic bonds. Precursor solutions were prepared with sodium alginate, a compound derived from seaweed that is known to be capable of ionic crosslinking. Different combinations of ionic salts, including magnesium, barium and calcium, were then added to 3D print objects with varying stiffness levels, a factor which affected how quickly the structures dissolved.

“The idea is that the attachments between polymers should come apart when the ions are removed, which we can do by adding a chelating agent that grabs all the ions,” said assistant professor Ian Wong. “This way we can pattern transient structures that dissolve away when we want them to.”

Read the full at IEEE.

Research Breakthrough: Cold Sintering

Researchers in Penn State’s Materials Research Institute, led by Clive Randall, recently discovered a process that could revolutionize the manufacturing industry. Known as cold sintering, the process could be used for developing materials we use every day, such as bricks and glass, at a much lower energy cost than the process used today. The researchers have shown their new process can be used to make at least 50 materials, and they are continuing to expand their research to incorporate additional materials.

 

If you wish to be kept updated on a daily basis on movements in the AM/IIoT world check out Twitter feed!

Innovation Hubs, focusing on the AM of tomorrow (Authentise Weekly News-In-Review – Week 27)

It is certain that AM is now becoming a staple of every product development laboratory on the planet. Some companies are taking their position to a whole new level by putting efforts and resources in AM innovation hubs. These facilities elevate the ability to delve deeper into AM, both in the present product development and in technology research for tomorrow’s machines. Private companies, like Parker Hannifin, are investing big in new facilities which will allow their engineers to explore new applications of emerging technologies and up their industrial advantage. On a larger scale, the UAE has recently opened their first ever 3D printing facility, part of a strategy to be world leaders in AM by 2030. By focusing so much on the capabilities of AM, businesses can come up with novel products for their market: Michelin came up with a new concept tire entirely revolving on 3D printing technology.

Parker Opens New Additive Manufacturing Facility to Accelerate Innovation in Product Design and Manufacturing

Parker Additive Manufacturing Facility

Parker Hannifin Corporation, the global leader in motion and control technologies, has opened a new state-of-the-art advanced manufacturing learning and development center […]. The facility will serve as a center of excellence where Parker engineers can explore new applications of emerging technologies such as additive manufacturing and collaborative robotics.

“Material printing technology is moving quickly towards commercial viability,” said Craig Maxwell, Vice President – Chief Technology and Innovation Officer. “The new facility and engineering talent located here represent an investment in the future of manufacturing.”

Read more here.

Launch of UAE’s first-ever 3D printing facility with Immensa Labs

SLS parts produced by Immensa Labs. Photo via Emirates 24/7.

The facility, which is based in Dubai, is part of the Dubai 3D printing strategy which was launched by Sheikh Mohammed bin Rashid Al Maktoum, Vice President and Prime Minister of UAE and Ruler of Dubai. The strategy aims to promote global implementation of 3D printing “for the service of humanity and promote the status of the UAE and Dubai as a leading hub of 3D printing technology by the year 2030.”

There are ample opportunities for organisations in the UAE to adopt AM to enhance their efficiencies and competitiveness, and we are focused on providing world-class and viable 3D printing solutions. – Fahmi Al-Shawwa, CEO of Immensa Technology Labs

Read more about the lab here.

Michelin unveils airless, biodegradable, 3D printed concept tire

The VISION concept tire. Photo via Jimmy Hamelin/Michelin.

At its International Mobility summit, Movin On, French tire manufacturer Michelin unveiled a new concept tire that is both airless and created with a 3D printer. Announcing the tire this week in Montreal, Canada, Michelin proposes a design for the future of sustainable mobility. The tire is rechargeable, biodegradable, complete with sensors for real-time monitoring, and claims to be completely 3D printed.

[…]VISION is possible since it is based on R&D know-how and we can already see the future applications, on which the Group is now working. It’s a promise that is within reach. – Mostapha El-Oulhani, Head of VISION Project

Read more about the concept tire here.

That’s it for this week, don’t forget to come back next week for another edition. In the mean time, our Twitter feed will be giving you constant updates on our services as well as the AM/IIoT world so come check it out!

Week in Review: Sept 5th to 11th – GE in the game!

Hello and welcome back to another Week in Review!

This has been a HUGE week for GE as it rocked the 3D printing market bidding $1.4 billion for the acquisition of SLM Solutions and Arcam. Its push into the AM market has been a driving force in the industry for years and now it’s looking to become the one actively pulling the strings. Here’s a good review of the deal. On the side we have exciting news coming from R&D around the world: telecommunications will soon get a major boost from 3D printed fiber optic tips and South Korea puts yet another 3D printed implant advancement in its wide ranging surgical arsenal.

Let’s get to it.

 

GE bidding $1.4B for Arcam and SLM, speeds up 3D printing push

The logo of General Electric is shown at their subsidiary company GE Aviation in Santa Ana, California April 13, 2016. REUTERS/Mike Blake - RTX2E4CJ

General Electric launched bids on Tuesday to buy two of the world’s top makers of machines for metal-based 3D printing – Sweden’s Arcam and Germany’s SLM Solutions – for a total $1.4 billion to bolster its position in the fast-growing technology. “Additive manufacturing will drive new levels of productivity for GE, our customers, including a wide array of additive manufacturing customers, and for the industrial world,” GE Chief Executive Jeff Immelt said in a statement.

Read more about the acquisition here.

 

Researchers devise method for 3D printing complex structures on micro optical fibers

A joint team of researchers have developed a new and innovative method for 3D printing minuscule but highly complex structures on tips of optical fibers, which have diameters as small as 125 micrometers. … “The development of this new technology offers many advantages in terms of reproducibility, flexibility in the design of optical structures, as well as cost” – Keiko Munechika, co-authore of the study.

Read the full article at 3ders.

 

Korea develops new 3D printed facial implants

image: nanjixiong

Professor Yoon Won-soo from Korea Polytechnic University  have developed a new biodegradable 3D printed implants’ material which will not only greatly avoid any complications but could also accelerate the regeneration of natural tissue. We’ve been using patients’ own bones to produce the implant for quite a long time, which could cause damage to the patient. This new material, however, could be made into satisfactory implants directly and is easier to implant with only two hours’ printing time compared to the original eight hours.

Read all about it here.

 

Authentise is sponsoring the Additive Manufacturing Conference 2016 this year. Check it out!

 

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