3D Printing is the framework for tomorrow’s manufacturing (Authentise Weekly News-In-Review – Week 79)

When planning the facilities of the future, 3D printing is now being cited among the top 3 manufacturing tools to deploy. Not only that, entirely new production pipelines are being developed to really crank up productivity through this medium, while still fully exploiting what makes 3D printing so unique. When you take a company like Boeing, which is starting to envision a near future where 3D printing enables customizable cabin interiors, of course they’ll still want to serialize part production as much as possible, to minimize production time and resource logistics. This is the reasoning behind the new EV production plant in Shanghai, which will be planned revolving around the 3D printed car framework from Divergent3D. Logistically, 3D printing enables a much nimbler pipeline, with agile manufacturing capabilities that will have a huge impact on the industry and the network of capillary infrastructures that are still based on last century thinking.

 

Boeing expects 3D printing to help airlines customize cabin interiors

Boeing is investing heavily in developing its additive manufacturing capabilities ahead of an expected increase in the number of applications for 3D printed commercial aircraft parts. The airframer already incorporates additive manufactured components into various aircraft cabin products, and expects the technology to provide airlines with a new way of customizing their interiors in the future.

Check out the full article here.

 

Shanghai Commits To Divergent 3D Printed Electric Vehicle Production

The Divergent 3D node-based additive manufacturing technology used to make the Blade supercar is to be the driver of a new electric vehicle (EV) production plant in Shanghai. The forthcoming factory is a joint development between EV investment firm We Solutions, and Shanghai Alliance Investment, a private equity and venture capital arm of Shanghai Municipal Government.

“It will only be a matter of time before policies come out stating that old vehicles have to be abolished. As a result we have to get ready, not only for the EV industry but for the world’s largest automovile industry. That’s why we’re entering the market.” says Eric Ho King-fung, chairman of We Solutions in an article for the South China Morning Post.

Read the article here.

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The importance of recognized standards in AM (Authentise Weekly News-In-Review – Week 61)

As of now, AM has already proven its worth as a manufacturing tool worthy of consideration in many industrial sectors. If it is to find a foothold in every major industry, guaranteeing both stellar performances and safety, standards and best practices need to be delineated. Industrial partners want to ensure the viability of AM workflows on a scalable platform: this requires a thorough understanding of all processes, materials, pipeline steps and so on. Similarly, govt. agencies want to boost its propagation by maximizing safety and reliability across the board. ISO and others have already paved the way, but new partners are now entering: Oerlikon and Boeing are one example in which industrial partners seek common operational ground. The CECIMO European body is another, promoting the adoption of manufacturing standards and AM research centers pushing the bureaucracy forward when it comes to certifications.

Boeing partners Oerlikon to speed up adoption of 3D printing

Boeing is co-operating with Swiss engineering group Oerlikon to jointly develop additive manufacturing processes in a bid to accelerate the technology’s wider employment.

“The research will initially focus on industrializing titanium powder bed fusion AM and ensuring parts made with this process meet the flight requirements of the US Federal Aviation Administration and Department of Defense,” says Oerlikon.

Read more about it here.

AM In Europe Boosted By CECIMO Partnership

Map of CECIMO nations. Image via CECIMO
Map of CECIMO nations. Image via CECIMO

CECIMO, the body behind Europe’s additive manufacturing strategy, has announced a new partnership with EPMA, the European Powder Metallurgy Association. Together, under a joint memorandum of understanding (MOU), the two organizations are aiming to promote the adoption of 3D printing throughout established manufacturing industries.

“If Europe aims to remain a leader in advanced manufacturing production, it will need to succeed in the global race to industrialize additive manufacturing” – comments Filip Geerts, Director General of CECIMO

Read the full article here.

DNV GL launches AM Centre of Excellence to define certification standards for oil & gas and offshore & marine sectors

DNV GL metal part

DNV GL, a global risk assurance and risk management company, is to establish a Global Additive Manufacturing Centre of Excellence in Singapore.

Supported by the Singapore Economic Development Board (EDB), DNV GL will consider qualification and certification, as well as provide training in AM for engineers. In the O&M sector, adoption of AM has been slow because of the challenges surrounding certification, according to DNV GL. The company, thus, wants to provide the industry with technical standards and guidelines to qualify and certify AM equipment, process, products and materials.

Read more at TCT Mag.

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Counterfeiting within the new digital thread (Authentise Weekly News-In-Review – Week 47)

The augmented possibilities of 3D printing within the manufacturing industry hide new kinds of threats and dangers which should be confronted seriously. The nature of the new digital thread being formed within industrial businesses worldwide is such that new avenues of malicious interventions, theft or even sabotage become decentralized and digitized. CAD files can be corrupted remotely and invisibly; Intellectual Property (IP) can be stolen directly or be accessed by digitizing (3D scanning) physical assets; 3D printers’ firmware and control sensors can be compromised to alter the printing results invisibly to the human eye. Counterfeiting is high on the list of perils. The international community is moving to secure AM processes by installing safe practices within the thread. Authentise has very recently announced a partnership with Prototech to enable automatic watermarking of printed objects. New roads of securing 3D printed object are being explored, like leaving chemical signatures that are only readable through X-rays.

3D printing presents cyber security risks for aircraft manufacturers, says Atlantic Council report

The Atlantic Council, a Washington, D.C. think-tank has released a new report which outlines the benefits and risks of 3D printing within the aviation sector. The report is entitled “Aviation Security: Finding Lift, Minimizing Drag.” […] According to the report, additive manufacturing opens up the possibility for three main kinds of cyberattacks: deny, which consists of the disruption of deletion of firmware, software, and product designs; compromise, which is the theft of intellectual property and product design files; and sabotage, which refers to “undetected modification” of printing files with the intention of weakening parts and corrupting their functions.

Write the full report here.

ProtoTech Solutions and Authentise Enable Automatic Watermarks For 3D Printing

Authentise, a leader in process automation software for additive manufacturing, today announced that it has partnered with ProtoTech Solutions, a niche software development company in the CAD/CAM/CAE, 3D visualization and data interoperability domain, to help 3Diax customers automatically embed watermarks such as serial numbers into digital designs. This enables more efficient and reliable tracking and sorting of parts within factories. It also has the potential to significantly speed up the supply chain and reduce the number of counterfeit parts in circulation.

Check out the full press release here.

Chemical Ghost Signature Protect DED 3D Printed Parts From Counterfeiting

DED 3D printed titanium samples with varying taggant depths used in the InfraTrac study. Photo via 3D Printing and Additive Manufacturing journal.

The solution proposed by Dr. Sharon Flank et al. from InfraTrac, is to add spectral signatures to the 3D printed parts that can only be read via x-ray. This technique is more cost effective than some of the other methods of experimentation as it can be conducted using off-the-shelf devices. […] In InfraTrac’s study, an Optomec M7 LENS system is used to 3D print titanium alloy samples. Chemical taggants are added to the parts at different depths, and scanned using x-ray fluorescence (XRF) spectroscopy analysis in lab conditions.

Read the full article here.

 

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Want disruptive? I’ll give you disruptive (Authentise Weekly News-In-Review – Week 18)

We are all starting to realize that AM is becoming the game changer it promised to be. This week there are mind-blowing examples of the technology being used to radically change the game economically and logistically all across the board. What do you think will be the impact on the manufacturing industry now that players realize that AM can bring shave costs in the millions of dollars like Boeing had on its Dreamliner production in collaboration with Norsk Titanium? Or when serialized production turnaround happens in days instead of months like Oracle managed to achieve with Carbon technology? On a wider note, AM will radically transform planning for operations where in-situ manufacturing is possible, making it much more economically viable to make use of local resources, especially in space activities.

3D Printing Titanium Parts Could Save Boeing Millions on Dreamliner Production

A 3D printed structural titanium component made with Norsk’s proprietary Rapid Plasma Deposition (RPD) process.

Boeing hired Norsk Titanium to print the first structural titanium parts for its 787 Dreamliner, a shift that the Norwegian 3D printing company said would eventually shave $2M to $3M off the cost of each plane. Strong, lightweight titanium alloy is 7 times more costly than aluminum, and accounts for about $17 million of the cost of a $265 million Dreamliner, industry sources say.
Boeing has been trying to reduce titanium costs on the 787, which requires more of the metal than other models because of its carbon-fiber fuselage and wings.

“This means $2M to $3M in savings for each Dreamliner, at least,” starting in 2018 when many more parts are being printed, Chip Yates, Norsk Titanium’s vice president of marketing, said in a telephone interview.

Read more about the collaboration here.

Carbon 3D print series of 10,000 parts for Oracle Labs servers

The 3D model (left) and a 3D printed branch (right) of the brackets stacked one on top of the other. Image & photo via Carbon

Oracle Labs, the R&D branch of multinational computer technology corporation Oracle, has used Carbon CLIP technology to 3D print a series of end-use brackets for use in its micro servers. 10,000 of the parts were needed to align circuit boards in the systems, and production was turned around within days instead of months. At first, Oracle planned on a component design reliant upon injection molding to hold the circuit boards. This method proved to be ineffective at producing such small parts within the required time frame, and the method didn’t support multiple design iterations.

“Instead of printing parts by inch CLIP let us print parts by hour. That’s game changing” – Craig Stephen, Senior Vice President Research & Development at Oracle Labs.

Read the full article at 3DPI.

Mining Materials for 3D Printing in Space

The first part 3D-printed from metal harvested from a meteorite. (Courtesy of Planetary Resources)

“Everything has a finite amount of resources. Everything has a cost and benefit”.

With limited resources, how can we populate multiple planets with only one livable environment? Fortunate for us, all of our resources originated in space. Planetary Resources made a point at the CES 2016 that mining asteroids was the future. It did this by using 3D printing and metal from a meteorite to produce a part. In addition, 3D printing may be the process of how things are built in space. Scientists have already 3D printed plastic objects in space, and they believe we can 3D-print metals. However, it might be simpler than this. If water freezes on the surface of the planets we are looking to build on, and there is hydrogen and water as a resource on these bodies, 3D printing ice in the shape of buildings might provide a robust housing. Sound nuts? NASA didn’t think so and awarded $25,000 to a team that designed a Mars Ice House for NASA’s 3D printed habitat challenge.

Read more about our space-faring possibilities at Machine Design.

 

Come back next week for another edition of News-In-Review and touch base at our Twitter feed where we share more AM and IIoT related news!

Tackling AM bottlenecks (Authentise Weekly News-In-Review – Week 17)

AM is bringing unprecedented capabilities to the industrial world but its technologies are still mostly experimental and much is being researched. Nonetheless, these bottlenecks are being addressed as we speak through sheer research and, on a higher level, by achieving the proper certification to make it into the real world. Researchers are putting under the spotlight every step of the AM process and have discovered a flaw which, if fixed, could dramatically speed up the whole process.  Crucial certifications’ specifics have been met by the team at Norsk Titanium in providing flight proof structural aircraft parts, the first to ever do so. Similarly, the complex system for complete AM industrialization is being finalized by Adidas to bring 3D printed shoes to mass-production.

 

New Research Could Help Speed Up the 3D Printing Process

A team of researchers from Binghamton University, State University of New York and MIT have identified some bottlenecks in 3D printers, that, if improved, could speed up the entire process. “We found that the rate at which a polymer melts is limiting in many implementations,” said Scott Schiffres, Binghamton Assistant Professor of Mechanical Engineering. “The pressure required to push the polymer through the nozzle is a sharp function of temperature. If the core is not hot enough, the printer will not be able to squeeze the polymer through the nozzle.”

Read the full article here.

 

Norsk Titanium 3D prints world’s first approved, structural, titanium components for commercial flight

The 3D printed and finished 787 Dreamliner component. Photo via Norsk Titanium

Norwegian aerospace additive manufacturing specialists Norsk Titanium AS has released details of a parts order from multinational aircraft corporation Boeing. According to Norsk, the ordered components will make the Boeing 787 Dreamliner the “first commercial airplane to fly with certified additive-manufactured titanium parts in structural applications.”

Read the full article at 3D Printing Industry.

 

How 3D Printing Will Optimize Your Next Pair of Running Shoes

custom shoes 3D printing

In the second half of 2017, Adidas is bringing [a new] level of customization to the U.S. with its Speedfactory, a production facility in the Atlanta area. Its goal is to deliver cutting-edge manufacturing and produce more shoes with “advanced complexity in color, materials, and sizes” for U.S.-based retailers and consumers. “The vision of Speedfactory is about making customized and personalized footwear for all people,” says Ben Herath, vice president of global design. “We’re bringing shoe manufacturing closer to the people and speeding up the manufacturing time.”

See the development story of 3D printed shoes here.

 

Don’t forget to follow us on Twitter to get more AM/IIoT related news and see you back next week for the next edition of News-In-Review!

Governments Driving AM (Authentise Weekly News-In-Review – Week 10)

Hi everyone, here we go for another weekly News-In-Review!

This week we highlight, through our selected news, how AM is bringing the wind of change to countries’ industrial planning and policies and how its inclusion has driven economic growth. Through wise policy making and good support investments, countries like South Africa and England and enabling the creation of business ecosystems, both startups and well-established realities. Germany is already harvesting the fruits of long standing AM companies, with innovation driven partnerships in the automotive industry and beyond.

Here’s to more international effort to get into AM!

Let’s dig in.

UK publishes Digital Strategy outlining plans for Makerspaces, IP protection for 3D printing, and internationally connected Tech Hubs

Westminster, including London's Houses of Parliament. Photo by Ged Carroll, on Flickr as renaissancechambara

The UK Department for Culture, Media & Sport has released a Digital Strategy for economic, educational and infrastructural growth of the nation. The policy follows a seven prong plan touching on the concepts of Makerspaces, FabLabs, 3D imaging, intellectual property for 3D printing, and growing international Tech Hubs. In February 2017, London Mayor Sadiq Khan also announced plans for a hub of industry in East London. As part of a total regeneration of the area, Silvertown is expected to feature the largest 3D printing facility in the UK.

Read more here.

South Africa in talks with Airbus, Boeing to print 3D parts

An Airbus A400M military aircraft. REUTERS/Fabrizio Bensch

Officially launched in 2011 and backed by government, the Aeroswift research project last year produced its first three demonstrator parts – a pilot’s throttle lever, a condition lever grip which is part of the throttle assembly, and a fuel tank pylon bracket, in a digital process known as 3D printing, or additive layer manufacturing. […] South Africa’s Council for Scientific and Industrial Research (CSIR), in partnership with local aerospace firm Aerosud Innovation Centre, say access to vast titanium reserves as well as pioneering the world’s largest titanium powder-based 3D printing machine should give them a competitive edge.

Read the full article here.

Five Stories Indicating Auto 3D Printing Is Kicking into High Gear

A 3D-printed water pump wheel for use in a DTM racecar. (Image courtesy of the BMW Group.)

Although there are numerous stories regarding the use of additive manufacturing (AM) in aerospace, due to the specialty components needed for critical applications, AM is also becoming increasingly prevalent for end part production in auto manufacturing. Below are just five of the big automotive AM stories that demonstrate its potential for auto manufacturing.

Read about the five stories at Engineering.com

 

AERODEF 2017:  We have a session titled ‘Additive Manufacturing from Lab to Production Scale‘ on Thursday 3/9 at 10 am, room 102 at Aerodef. Come see us, we’d love to meet you!

This is it for this week, don’t forget to follow us on Twitter and come back next week for the upcoming edition.