Where are our 3D printed homes? Progress within the building industry (Authentise Weekly News-In-Review – #104)

It seems that after the initial outpour of hype for the construction building to adopt 3D printing in pretty much every application, the buzz has died down. We got so excited by the MX3D bridge in Amsterdam and the impressive print times of the homes by WinSun or ApisCor. Where’s our building industry boom? In truth, much of this sector still needs much R&D to be of widespread use: material sciences for printable and reliable cement, building design for printability, construction-grounds automation, even simple order-of-operations. But progress is happening that makes us hopeful. For one, the industry is seeing new players enter the fray, with a Long Island startup boasting to print a house in just 30h. Internationally, we see more projects coming to a close, with China inaugurating a new 3D printed bridge. Permits are being granted and laws are being brought up to speed for new buildings to finally start rolling out, which might make the dream closer than one might think.

Can this startup 3D-print a home in 30 hours?

A group of friends on the south shore of Long Island, New York, working under the name S-Squared, think they can revolutionize the way that homes are built, using a self-made 3D printing rig that they claim can lay down a home in a little more than 30 hours. The promised sale price—under $200,000, due to the reduction in manpower and labor costs—would be a game-changer for an expensive market such as Long Island. It would also be a new entry into the wide field of firms seeking to perfect and commercialize the process of mass-producing homes using 3D printing.

“This will be the first time a real house is going to be built with 3D printing,” says Bob Smith, an S-Squared co-founder. “Everyone else has put up sheds.”

Read the full story at Curbed.

China’s first 3D-printed footbridge opens in Shanghai

bridge

The span, which opened for business on Friday, was created by Shanghai Machinery Construction Group using materials made by Polymaker, the state-run China News Service reported. On its website, the Shanghai government described the new bridge as an “innovative way to promote 3D printing technology and popularise it in urban construction”.

“It’s both an everyday, practical application and an interactive one that involves people touching and even relying upon … a 3D printed thing,” Polymaker said on its website.

Keep reading here.

Sunconomy To Develop 3D Printed Concrete Homes


Sunconomy, a U.S. construction company, has received permits to build its first 3D printed geopolymer additively manufactured house in Lago Vista, Texas. These homes will include three bedrooms, and two bathrooms with a detached garage, solar, wind, battery backup, and a rainwater catchment system, at an estimated cost of $289,000.

Larry Haines, the founder of Sunconomy, stated, “We will be able to build the structure for a single family house in a day with virtually no waste, and built super strong and providing very low utility costs. Now that’s Sustainable!”

Read more here.

 

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Bolstering, and Innovating, Local Manufacturing (Authentise Weekly News-In-Review – Week 08)

Hello everyone and welcome to another edition of the weekly News-In-Review, brought to you by Authentise!

There are quite a few factors that contribute to AM’s status as king of the hill of advanced manufacturing processes. By the very nature of AM, manufacturing is becoming decentralized, democratized and is opening doors to new industrial workflows, much more efficient and smart than before. This allows countries to diminish retain manufacturing (and the added value) locally, industrializing their economy (as IMTS’ development of India’s first jet engine). Integrating and developing new manufacturing paradigms like AM will create competitive advantages (as Russia is doing in 3D printed construction), jobs and invigorate the local industrial scene, and enable a greener and more material-efficient economic model (as the UK’s Green Alliance points out).

Here are just a few examples. Let’s take a look.

Intech DMLS developing “India’s first jet engine”

Intech DMLS, a metal additive manufacturing company from India, have announced the development of the country’s first jet engine series. […] the MJE20 engine starts small, powering unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) and remote-controlled aircraft. According to the Times of India, this will make them the first Asian country to develop an indigenous jet engine.

Read more here.

3D printing construction company Apis Cor prints 37 m2 house near Moscow, plans global expansion

Apis Cor, an additive manufacturing construction company based in San Francisco and the Russian cities of Moscow and Irkutsk, has used its own construction 3D printer to build a 3D printed house in Stupino, near Moscow. Construction of the 37m2 building took less than a day. “We are people,” Apis Cor says. “Engineers, managers, builders, and inventors sharing one common idea—to change the construction industry so that millions of people will have an opportunity to improve their living conditions.”

Read more about this ambitious project here.

3D Printing and the Green Economy

Capture

3D printing may play a role in creating a more resource-efficient economy in the UK according to a new study conducted by Green Alliance, a British think tank.
The study, “Getting it Right from the Start: Developing a Circular Economy for Novel Materials,” posits that using new materials and designing for recycling could lower manufacturing costs in Great Britain. The study was conducted for Innovate UK, the High-Value Manufacturing Catapult and the Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council. The use of carbon fiber, bioplastics and 3D printing technologies can create parts and products that are even more durable than those that use plastics created from fossil fuels. These technologies could also enable new, more eco-friendly business models and product lifecycles.

 

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Big Data to tackle Big Problems (Authentise Weekly News-In-Review – Week 06)

Hi and welcome to another edition of the News-In-Review, brought to you by Authentise!

The computational power at our disposal is increasing exponentially, being that of the phone in our pockets or the super-computer of the country next door. In our interconnected world, data is engulfing everything (as highlighted in our Week 3 edition). This week we propose how the two are coming together to address the great problems in our world, from national resource management to safer and more accurate than ever 3D printing. As IIoT is embedded in the national grid, it’s changing from a rigid, failure prone network to an efficient, system optimized in real time approach thanks to data-driven analytics. Processing that data requires new IT innovations, such as the first exascale super-computer now built in Chian. This, previously unattainable computational power allows us to simulate better 3D printing designs, materials and processes and can be used to unlock more AM use cases, such as construction.

As ever, there’s a lot to cover here. Let’s jump in!

Big Water – Big Data Is Reshaping The Water Industry

Data management, exploratory analytics, data visualization and predictive algorithms enable the discovery of important behavioral characteristics of highly‐complex urban infrastructure. Water management relies on heavy physical infrastructure and reactive administration. This changes with the development of cyber-physical systems, real-time monitoring, big data analysis and predictive machine learning algorithms and the IoT. These systems enable a transition from reacting to optimized, proactive and cost-efficient management processes.

Check out the full article here.

World’s First Exascale Supercomputer to Enhance 3D Printing Capabilities

The Tianhe-2 Super Computer

China’s National Supercomputer Centre announced that the prototype for its exascale supercomputer will be completed later this year, ahead of its initial date in 2018. The successful performance and commercialization of the computer is presumed to drastically improve existing 3D printing or additive manufacturing methods. […] Through the usage of an exascale computing-based application, manufacturers will be able to use additive manufacturing technologies to better simulate end products and significantly optimize processes before the last stage of manufacturing.

Read the full article here.

Building by numbers: how 3D printing is shaking up the construction industry

Stewart Williams [admits] that quality control represents a major challenge [to the building industry]. To be viable, any printed building technique will have systems that can constantly monitor and inspect the materials as they are being produced. As he notes wryly: “You wouldn’t want to build a massive beam and get to the end and find you’ve got some holes in it.” Assuming regulators can be convinced, the potential upsides of 3D printing for the construction industry could be huge. Among the factors in the technology’s favor are productivity gains, reduced labor costs and safer working environments, as well as the sort of one-off, complex building designs that are not technically and economically feasible at present.

Read the whole article at the Guardian.

 

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