The Stock is Stuck in the Past: tech is changing the warehouse (Authentise Weekly News-In-Review – #129)

The entire supply chain is being redefined by transformative technologies, turning on their heads old notions of manufacturing and shipping. Change is coming from multiple angles, all aimed towards a single, common goal: making the warehouse obsolete. The main reason is to address a greater need for production agility, being locked down by large inventories of items that are expensive to maintain and risk getting surpassed before even being used. The future is geared towards high customization and rapid delivery. By inching additive manufacturing closer to being a production technology, items can be produced on-demand and in-situ, jumping over a large chunk of a logistical nightmare. Speaking of which, IIoT networks are making it easier than ever to analyze the data necessary to maintain a high operational awareness, enabling pro-active planning instead of reactive.

The Rise of the On-Demand Warehouse

In China the expectations are even more demanding [than Amazon’s] — JD.com (a huge Chinese online retailer) makes 90% of its deliveries within 24 hours, with 57% arriving within 12 hours. Experiences like this are delightful for the customer and fascinating for the investor. What allows such a supercharged supply chain to exist? What hurdles have to be overcome? And, more importantly, what are potential future opportunities and what would it take to get there?

Read the full article at Medium.

3D Printing Is Finally Ready For Its Close-Up

Selective laser melting, direct metal laser sintering, 3d printing, industry 4.0

Zero inventory” has been mostly unobtainable for manufacturers. But cutting-edge 3D printing technology is giving managers renewed hope. Carbon announced Tuesday it raised $260 million in growth funding. This San Francisco company is developing a platform executives claim will bring 3D printing to high-volume production. This would mean the end of inventories, and the beginning of new business models.

Keep reading at Forbes.

Why logistics scenarios matter for the future of the industrial IoT

A tanker at sea.

We will see faster speeds throughout the chain, which will become more efficient, convenient and sustainable by orders of magnitude. That’s because 5G will power the Industrial Internet of Things (IIoT), enabling large-scale, real-time connectivity all the time. What if all of these devices could interact with one another without human intervention? What would this type of constant connectivity look like at scale, in complex logistics operations, for example?

Read the full article at World Economic Forum.

 

 

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Bringing sports to higher standards through 3D printing (Authentise Weekly News-In-Review – #107)

Coming up on the Super Bowl, we are reminded that sports are a love affair with peak performance and health risks. 3D printing is a key player when it comes to looking after the athletes’ wellbeing while at the same time providing them the edge over their adversaries. Just looking at the NFL, head-trauma is a very serious problem, and Riddell is developing football helmets that are custom-fitted from scans of the athletes’ heads to improve its safety features. At the same time, 3D printing is already giving the upper hand for teams to win big. Chinese speed skating athletes won the gold at the last winter Olympics partly thanks to the new and improved glove tips, that are lighter, stronger and provide less friction, plus are custom made for the person wearing them. Innovation isn’t coming just to the frontline of sports, as companies like Nike and Adidas are pushing 3D printing to production standards, democratizing the new levels of performance that the technology enables.

 

Why NFL players are wearing this new custom 3D-printed helmet

helmet

Ahead of the Super Bowl, the NFL is testing out the first helmet to be made with 3D printing. Each Riddell helmet is custom-made for a player based on a scan of his head. Former players like Peyton Manning are excited about the comfortable custom fit and potential to make football safer.

Link to the video here.

 

3D Printing Helped Chinese Team Win Gold at 2018 Winter Olympics

The Chinese team, [at the 2018 Winter Olympics] had special gloves with 3D printed metal fingertips, courtesy of Chinese 3D printing company Farsoon Technologies. Glove tips are normally made of resin or gel, but the metal tips provided a number of advantages. These included less friction between the athletes’ fingers and the ice. Made from titanium alloy (Ti6Al4V), the tips were buffed and polished so that they had a smoother surface and produced less drag than traditional glove tips. They were also designed to be comfortable and lightweight – they had 40% less weight and higher structural strength, while the wall thickness was reduced by 75%.

Read the full article here.

 

How Adidas Plans To Bring 3D Printing To The Masses

Adidas is not only planning to introduce by the end of this year 100,000 pairs of shoes with plastic midsoles made via a new 3D technology created by Silicon Valley startup Carbon; it’s also making moves to ramp up that production to millions in the coming years, said James Carnes, vice president of strategy creation for Adidas’s namesake brand.

“We have a really aggressive plan to scale this,” Carnes said in an interview. “We are scaling a production. The plan will put us as the (world’s) biggest producer of 3D-printed products.”

Read the full article here.

 

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How large companies are (or plan to) leverage AM (Authentise Weekly News-In-Review – Week 74)

Big companies are the first to experiment and get to know the features of new technologies. Their job is to stay on top of the competition and new manufacturing techniques like AM are bringing new possibilities. However, part of the process is recognizing where the technology would be most beneficial. Right now, AM is being actively employed for prototyping and iterating the design of entirely new types of parts. Ford, for example, is experimenting with large-format 3D printing to bring to its car manufacturing. For other companies, where the runs are small and often full of complex parts, AM is a real game-changer. Airbus has been 3D printing panels for its A350 XWB model airplane, saving weight and money. Even though the dream of bringing AM to mass manufacturing plants is still a ways off, progress is being made to make it a reality. Adidas is testing the fast, production-level 3D printer from Carbon to produce as many as 100’000 AM-enabled shoe pairs by the year’s end.

3D printing: Ford pilot project goes large

The automaker is running a project with Stratasys, a manufacturer of additive manufacturing systems based in Eden Prairie, Minn., that’s testing the production of big, single-piece units as prototypes, auto parts and components. Ford recognizes the Stratasys system as a potentially more efficient and affordable way to create tooling, prototype parts, make components for low-volume vehicles (such as performance cars) and produce personalized car parts.

Read more at Plant.ca

Airbus saves 15% in material weight due to 3D printing

The European aircraft manufacturer, Airbus, has been working with Materialise’s Certified Additive Manufacturing for two, creating plastic parts for aircraft through 3D printing. The manufacturer has noted the benefits of 3D printing for small batch production, enabling more customization whilst being time and cost-effective.

Read the full article here.

How Adidas Plans To Bring 3D Printing To The Masses

Adidas is not only planning to introduce by the end of this year 100,000 pairs of shoes with plastic midsoles made via a new 3D technology created by Silicon Valley startup Carbon; it’s also making moves to ramp up that production to millions in the coming years, said James Carnes, vice president of strategy creation for Adidas’s namesake brand.

“We have a really aggressive plan to scale this,” Carnes said in an interview. “We are scaling a production. The plan will put us as the (world’s) biggest producer of 3D-printed products.”

Read the rest of the article here.

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Want disruptive? I’ll give you disruptive (Authentise Weekly News-In-Review – Week 18)

We are all starting to realize that AM is becoming the game changer it promised to be. This week there are mind-blowing examples of the technology being used to radically change the game economically and logistically all across the board. What do you think will be the impact on the manufacturing industry now that players realize that AM can bring shave costs in the millions of dollars like Boeing had on its Dreamliner production in collaboration with Norsk Titanium? Or when serialized production turnaround happens in days instead of months like Oracle managed to achieve with Carbon technology? On a wider note, AM will radically transform planning for operations where in-situ manufacturing is possible, making it much more economically viable to make use of local resources, especially in space activities.

3D Printing Titanium Parts Could Save Boeing Millions on Dreamliner Production

A 3D printed structural titanium component made with Norsk’s proprietary Rapid Plasma Deposition (RPD) process.

Boeing hired Norsk Titanium to print the first structural titanium parts for its 787 Dreamliner, a shift that the Norwegian 3D printing company said would eventually shave $2M to $3M off the cost of each plane. Strong, lightweight titanium alloy is 7 times more costly than aluminum, and accounts for about $17 million of the cost of a $265 million Dreamliner, industry sources say.
Boeing has been trying to reduce titanium costs on the 787, which requires more of the metal than other models because of its carbon-fiber fuselage and wings.

“This means $2M to $3M in savings for each Dreamliner, at least,” starting in 2018 when many more parts are being printed, Chip Yates, Norsk Titanium’s vice president of marketing, said in a telephone interview.

Read more about the collaboration here.

Carbon 3D print series of 10,000 parts for Oracle Labs servers

The 3D model (left) and a 3D printed branch (right) of the brackets stacked one on top of the other. Image & photo via Carbon

Oracle Labs, the R&D branch of multinational computer technology corporation Oracle, has used Carbon CLIP technology to 3D print a series of end-use brackets for use in its micro servers. 10,000 of the parts were needed to align circuit boards in the systems, and production was turned around within days instead of months. At first, Oracle planned on a component design reliant upon injection molding to hold the circuit boards. This method proved to be ineffective at producing such small parts within the required time frame, and the method didn’t support multiple design iterations.

“Instead of printing parts by inch CLIP let us print parts by hour. That’s game changing” – Craig Stephen, Senior Vice President Research & Development at Oracle Labs.

Read the full article at 3DPI.

Mining Materials for 3D Printing in Space

The first part 3D-printed from metal harvested from a meteorite. (Courtesy of Planetary Resources)

“Everything has a finite amount of resources. Everything has a cost and benefit”.

With limited resources, how can we populate multiple planets with only one livable environment? Fortunate for us, all of our resources originated in space. Planetary Resources made a point at the CES 2016 that mining asteroids was the future. It did this by using 3D printing and metal from a meteorite to produce a part. In addition, 3D printing may be the process of how things are built in space. Scientists have already 3D printed plastic objects in space, and they believe we can 3D-print metals. However, it might be simpler than this. If water freezes on the surface of the planets we are looking to build on, and there is hydrogen and water as a resource on these bodies, 3D printing ice in the shape of buildings might provide a robust housing. Sound nuts? NASA didn’t think so and awarded $25,000 to a team that designed a Mars Ice House for NASA’s 3D printed habitat challenge.

Read more about our space-faring possibilities at Machine Design.

 

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Go Big or Go Home (Authentise Weekly News-In-Review – Week 16)

AM has matured into a fully fledged industrial manufacturing technology. As its materials, processes and applications broaden the jump to full-scale implementation is getting more and more a feasible possibility. The potential to disrupt various industries is being recognized by nations all over the globe: South Korea is one such nation at the forefront of innovation and it has decided to invest 41.2 billion won (Approx. $37 million USD) to foster the development of AM as a key innovation technology. Adidas, on the other hand, seems ready to tackle the stagnating idea that 3D printing is “all hype”. It announced that its concept shoe Futurecraft 4D is ready to be mass-produced as early as 2018, proof that the technology is more than capable to sustain its reputation as a manufacturing game-changer. This is surely shaping up to be the year of the “Go Big or Go Home” mantra, for AM and other important trends. For example in IIoT, where  Ubicquia wants to apply its concept on a city-scale.

South Korea to develop nation’s 3D printing industry with investment of over 41 billion won

Central district district of South Korea's capital city Seoul, viewed from Mt. Namsan. Photo by zuk0 on Flickr

The Ministry of Science, ICT and Future Planning in South Korea has announced it will be spending 41.2 billion won (Approx. $37 million USD) of 2017’s annual budget to encourage the development of 3D printing across the nation. Kang Seong-joo, an official from the ministry, says: “The 3D printing industry is the core technology that will bring about innovation in the manufacturing realm and create a new market by changing the paradigm of the industry. It is important for ministries to cooperate to actively deal with the fast-changing global trend.”

Read more here.

Adidas Futurecraft 4D starts a new era of 3D-printed shoes

Capture

Adidas is back with another sneaker based on a 3D-printed midsole, but this time the company says it’s moving even closer to mass production. The Futurecraft 4D shoe will be the first one using Carbon‘s “Digital Light Synthesis” process. The Silicon Valley company’s tech creates 3D items by blasting liquid with light, which Adidas says will allow it to operate on “a completely different manufacturing scale.” […] its plan to scale up projects more than 100,000 pairs made with the Digital Light Synthesis method by the end of 2018.

Read the full article at Engadget.

Revolutionizing the IIoT Industry One Streetlight at a Time

Sao Paulo industrial IoT Kairo Ubicquia

When Zimmerman [co-founder and chief technology officer of Ubicquia, an Industrial Internet of Things (IIoT) provider] recognized that a light pole could potentially solve all three of those challenges [power, networking and cost], the idea for Kairo began to take form. Over several months, Ubicquia designed and built a wide range of microcontroller boards featuring a variety of sensors and actuators that could be housed in a form factor no larger than a soda can. Kairo empowered sensor and application data to be harnessed by myriad of smart-city applications, delivering improved operations and planning, as well as better decision-making by city government.

Read all about Kairo at Spectrum.

 

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