Why AM Certifications are so difficult (Authentise Weekly News-In-Review – Week 97)

For AM to take a greater hold on the industries it’s poised to impact, there are certain angles to smooth out and one of those is certifications. Early adopters of additive production such as aerospace and medical are rightly picky about its certifications and the AM community is making sure to have its own record straight. Safety certifications are the highest priority in this regard and Lockheed Martin’s facility in Sunnyvale, California now holds the first UL certified in the world. Govt. bodies are also moving to help a wider audience to stay within standards, like Health Canada’s newest draft guidance on AM medical devices. However, the main reason why certifications are difficult is that AM is still not an exact science. With fast and multi-spectrum monitoring technologies, we are starting to see what happens during the process. However, certain aspects of the physics behind it are full of variables we don’t understand.

Lockheed Martin extends additive manufacturing to key spacecraft components

Lockheed Martin’s Additive Design and Manufacturing Center in Sunnyvale, California, where the company produces military, commercial and civil space technology, attained a comprehensive safety certification.

“We are the first UL certified additive manufacturing facility in the world,” Servando Cuellar, Lockheed Martin Space Systems engineering senior manager, told SpaceNews.

Read more here.

Health Canada Drafts Policies on 3D-Printed Implantable Devices

Health Canada Drafts Policies on 3D-Printed Implantable Devices

 

 

 

 

Health Canada released draft guidance Thursday to aid manufacturers in preparing license applications for implantable medical devices produced by additive manufacturing or 3D-printing. The guidance “represents the first phase of 3D-printing policy in Canada” because Health Canada intends to continuously adapt its policies to emerging issues on the topic “due to the fast-changing technological environment,” the regulator said.

Read the full article here.

High-Speed Cameras Used to Monitor 3D Printing Process

3D printing, particularly laser-powder bed fusion or L-PBF, requires a great deal of monitoring to avoid defects and flaws in the final parts. In a thesis entitled “Process Monitoring for Temporal-Spatial Modeling of Laser Powder Bed Fusion,” a student named Animek Shaurya studies the use of high-speed video cameras for in-situ monitoring of the 3D printing process of nickel alloy 625 to detect meltpool, splatter, and over melting regions to improve the quality of the print.

Read more here.

We’ll be at Formnext in Frankfurt from the 13th to 16th November. Come see us at booth #B30J.

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Farnborough Airshow – AM on aerospace’s spotlight (Authentise Weekly News-In-Review – Week 82)

Last week, our CEO Andre Wegner attended the Farnborough Airshow. What was presented there represented the very cutting edge of the aerospace industry, contributing to a record-breaking $192B in orders, and what happened behind closed doors was even more exciting.
3D printing featured prominently within its halls, as the technology was shown employed to optimize both the performance of the parts it redesigned and the design/production process itself. The industry is renowned for its tight certification specifications, and this is one of the topics that are closer to the heart of those players who want to be held as trend leaders. The event was the perfect opportunity for companies and collaborations to show their latest 3D printed aircraft parts, like the Norsk Titanium/Pratt & Whitney integrally bladed rotor (IBR) among many others. What are most interesting, however, are the deals and collaborations that have been announced coming from the airshow. An MoU between Oerlikon and RUAD on the development of space components, printers’ deals and material development contracts between GE Additive and Eaton and AP&C, represents just a fraction of the movement the 3D printing industry is displaying.

 

Inside Aerospace AM Certification At Farnborough Airshow 2018

Norsk Titanium 3D printed aft galley brackets on display at Farnborough Airshow 2018. Photo by Beau Jackson

As a high-value, and heavily standardized industry, certification of course is one of the main preoccupations when considering 3D printing in aerospace. In conversations with steel manufacturer and distributor Carpenter Technology, Rapid Plasma Deposition (RPD) company Norsk Titanium and Boeing Horizon X beneficiary Morf3D, I explore this topic a little deeper to underline a picture of the technology’s progress in this heavyweight industry.

Read the full analysis here.

 

Norsk Titanium, Pratt & Whitney, 3D Printed Integrally Bladed Rotor And More Aerospace Announcements

Norsk Titanium, an aerospace additive manufacturing company with headquarters in Norway, alongside a team of aerospace industry specialists, have collaborated to create and test the first additive manufactured integrally bladed rotor (IBR) used within turbine engines. The University of Notre Dame Turbomachinery Laboratory (NDTL), Pratt & Whitney and TURBOCAM International are included in the industry team.

“We are excited to collaborate on these manufacturing and testing efforts and applications for future engine development,” said Dave Carter, Senior Vice President, Engineering, at Pratt & Whitney.

Read the rest of the article here.

 

RUAG and Oerlikon sign 3D printed space components MoU

Oerlikon and RUAG Space have signed a Memorandum of Understanding today during the Farnborough Airshow to qualify and accelerate series production of 3D printed space components. Oerlikon and RUAG Space are already working together on the qualification of a bracket that would be installed on a payload fairing. A new optimised design made possible through additive manufacturing will reduce costs by 25% and decrease weight by more than 50%, while doubling the stiffness of the bracket. The collaboration on the bracket exemplifies the companies’ strong partnership, which will be deepened further through this initiative.

Read more here.

 

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Tackling AM bottlenecks (Authentise Weekly News-In-Review – Week 17)

AM is bringing unprecedented capabilities to the industrial world but its technologies are still mostly experimental and much is being researched. Nonetheless, these bottlenecks are being addressed as we speak through sheer research and, on a higher level, by achieving the proper certification to make it into the real world. Researchers are putting under the spotlight every step of the AM process and have discovered a flaw which, if fixed, could dramatically speed up the whole process.  Crucial certifications’ specifics have been met by the team at Norsk Titanium in providing flight proof structural aircraft parts, the first to ever do so. Similarly, the complex system for complete AM industrialization is being finalized by Adidas to bring 3D printed shoes to mass-production.

 

New Research Could Help Speed Up the 3D Printing Process

A team of researchers from Binghamton University, State University of New York and MIT have identified some bottlenecks in 3D printers, that, if improved, could speed up the entire process. “We found that the rate at which a polymer melts is limiting in many implementations,” said Scott Schiffres, Binghamton Assistant Professor of Mechanical Engineering. “The pressure required to push the polymer through the nozzle is a sharp function of temperature. If the core is not hot enough, the printer will not be able to squeeze the polymer through the nozzle.”

Read the full article here.

 

Norsk Titanium 3D prints world’s first approved, structural, titanium components for commercial flight

The 3D printed and finished 787 Dreamliner component. Photo via Norsk Titanium

Norwegian aerospace additive manufacturing specialists Norsk Titanium AS has released details of a parts order from multinational aircraft corporation Boeing. According to Norsk, the ordered components will make the Boeing 787 Dreamliner the “first commercial airplane to fly with certified additive-manufactured titanium parts in structural applications.”

Read the full article at 3D Printing Industry.

 

How 3D Printing Will Optimize Your Next Pair of Running Shoes

custom shoes 3D printing

In the second half of 2017, Adidas is bringing [a new] level of customization to the U.S. with its Speedfactory, a production facility in the Atlanta area. Its goal is to deliver cutting-edge manufacturing and produce more shoes with “advanced complexity in color, materials, and sizes” for U.S.-based retailers and consumers. “The vision of Speedfactory is about making customized and personalized footwear for all people,” says Ben Herath, vice president of global design. “We’re bringing shoe manufacturing closer to the people and speeding up the manufacturing time.”

See the development story of 3D printed shoes here.

 

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