Formnext showed us how the AM industry is maturing (Authentise Weekly News-In-Review – Week 98)

The Authentise team has been exhibiting at Formnext in Frankfurt this past week. We had a blast exchanging views on the AM world and better understanding the industry as a whole. In the times between meetings and booth chats, we had the chance to roam the halls and take a peek at what’s on the horizon. What’s been consistently shown is a maturity and wide-ranging offering of products and services. The AM industry is cementing its stance, partly thanks to proven applications and no lack of R&D investment. As we saw it, Formnext was a chance for progress, not groundbreaking. This is not to say that there wasn’t innovation to be found within its halls, on the contrary. But the players are now pushing for market permeation more than ever.

EOS TO PREMIERE MILLION-LASER POLYMER 3D PRINTING AT FORMNEXT 2018

Powder exposure on the LaserProFusion. Photo via EOS
Leading 3D printer manufacturer and service provider EOS, is to debut a new polymer 3D printing technology at Formnext 2018 in Frankfurt next week. This technology, which is reportedly capable of replacing “injection molding in many contexts,” will be presented alongside a demo of Richard Browning’s 3D printed jetpack, and the company’s new quad laser EOS M 300-4 metal system as a production cell. The new developments from the company are made to increase 3D printer outputs to an industrially-competitive scale, a key theme throughout the industry as we saw at last year’s Formnext, and a chief preoccupation for EOS and its partners.

Read the full article here.

FIT AG presents ‘Spare Parts on Demand’ additive manufacturing solution at Formnext

SPOD FIT AG

FIT AG has presented its ‘Spare Parts on Demand’ (SPOD) solution at Formnext which employs additive manufacturing to produce industrial replacement components. As most parts that need replacing have been made with traditional methods, they have often passed through an approval process, meaning it isn’t possible to create a 3D printed copy. Deutsche Bahn, a German railway company, encountered this problem when attempting to replace the left sandbox housing in a brake system. The component had been manufactured in cast grey iron, and so the part had to be redesigned and then printed in titanium using EBM. The printed part has so far passed on all tests performed. At Formnext, FIT AG has showcased SPOD as a way for this success to be achieved with more regularity.

Read more here.

Nanoscribe awarded €40K prize, showcases microscale printing at Formnext
Tess Boissonneault

nanoscribe microscale

Nanoscribe, a specialist in microscale additive manufacturing, was recently selected as the first place winner of the Baden-Württemberg State Prize for Young Companies. The award, worth €40,000, is bestowed upon companies that demonstrate economic success and make a sustainable contribution to society in some way. This week, Nanoscribe has been showcasing its technology at Formnext in Frankfurt. There, the company is exhibiting the fabrication of structures with micrometer precision in millimeter dimensions for the first time.

Read the full article here.

 

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Certifying AM for Industrial Excellence (Authentise Weekly News-In-Review – Week 11)

Hello to all our viewers, welcome to this week’s edition of News-In-Review!

Every week we are swarmed with varied news from the AM world which makes it hard to pinpoint a common theme or thread to talk about. Nevertheless, the world of 3D printing made giant leaps this week with regards to getting its righteous spot in the pantheon of certified industrial technologies. Lloyd’s Register has released an updated framework for metal AM parts certification to encourage the safe adoption of this technology in every industry. Siemens have provided an AM replacement part for a Slovenian nuclear power plant, passing the required quality certifications. And if further use cases were needed to prove the point, SSL has been using around 50-60 AM components in its satellites and we all know how stringent aerospace requirements can be.

Let’s dive in.

Lloyd’s Register, TWI release updated framework for 3D printed metal certification

Prof. Attallah steps on a 3D printed metal lattice Photo by www.edwardmoss.co.uk All rights reserved University of Birmingham Alumni

Headquartered in London, Lloyd’s Register (LR) has released an updated version of its metal additive manufacturing framework. Jointly published by research and technology organization TWI, the framework hopes to encourage “safe adoption” of metal 3D printing by promoting certification of parts. According to Lloyd’s Register, the new certification framework for AM metallic components “Provides a step-by-step approach to provide the necessary level of consistency, qualification and confidence to enable manufacturers an approach they can use alongside LR’s inspection and certification services”.

Read the full article here.

Siemens 3D prints part for nuclear power plant

The largest manufacturing and electronics company in Europe, Siemens announces it has 3D printed a replacement part for a nuclear power plant in Slovenia. The part was produced for the Krško nuclear power plant in Vrbina, Slovenia. According to Siemens, the power plant provides power for one-quarter of Slovenia and 15% of neighboring Croatia. This is a significant accomplishment not just for Siemens but for the 3D printing industry as a whole because implementing this part required undergoing stringent certification and qualification processes spanning several months. The news further validates 3D printing as an advanced manufacturing technique.

Read more here.

3D printing saving satellite builders time and money

Satellite manufacturers are turning increasingly to additive manufacturing to reduce the cost and time required to design and build spacecraft. SSL announced March 7 that its most complex additively manufactured part, an antenna tower with 37 printed titanium nodes and more than 80 graphite struts, is performing as intended. […] “We have satellites ready for launch that have 50 to 60 printed parts on them,” Mark Spiwak, Boeing Satellite Systems International president, said March 7 during a press briefing at the Satellite 2017 conference. “We are actively working with our suppliers on complex brackets and fittings that used to be machined parts. There is tremendous progress being made.”

Read the full article at Space News.

 

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