Data/Advanced technologies lay groundwork for new economic models (Authentise Weekly News-In-Review – Week 87)

The current trade wars between the US, Europe and China are proving to be a thorn in everyone’s side, and people are looking for solutions. This may not come from a change in political climates (sadly), however the technological trends we have been observing in the past few decades point towards an exciting possible outcome. The economy as we have it structured today may not hold up to new manufacturing technologies that enable decentralized, as-needed production. 3D printing is making it redundant to have warehouse stock and to deal with the infinitely complex hassle of global logistics. Plus, every step of the pipeline is being digitized, made flexible and agile, empowered by data and capable of so much more than if constrained in its traditional box. As Apple has proven, data is the new oil and is the foundation of present and future enterprises. Are current laws up to these elevated standards? Do we need to revise our concept of economy in light of these affirmed and evolving technologies?

 

How 3D printing could help save us from trade wars

Capture

While tariffs and trade wars from the White House may threaten our jobs, peace and prosperity, technology innovations from American business could save us. Just as new technology in energy production and extraction have reduced our dependence on the Middle East, a technology innovation of a very different sort — 3D printing — is already poised to reduce our dependence on Asian factories.

Read the rest here.

 

3D Printing Industry Experts Comment On Impact Of Trade Wars Tariffs On Additive Manufacturing


Today marks the start of US trade tariffs on goods valued at $34 billion worth of imports from China. A list published by the Office of the United States Trade Representative (USTR) details the 818 tariff lines that will be subject to an additional 25% in duty. China has responded with additional import taxes on US goods valued at a similar amount. 3D Printing Industry contacted resellers, manufacturers and other 3D printing insiders around the world for their thoughts about how the “the biggest trade war in economic history” will impact additive manufacturing.

Read the interviews on 3D Printing Industry.

 

Apple Is The New Exxon And Data Is The New Oil: The Path To The First $10 Trillion Company

There is no longer any doubt that the 21st century will be propelled by companies producing and using data, just as the 20th century was propelled by companies producing and using oil. The analogies are numerous and accurate and all emanate from the core reality: the century-long era of petroleum and the rise of automobiles and aviation is now followed one of data and the rise of computers and robots.

Read the rest on Forbes.

 

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AUTHENTISE will be exhibiting, through a partnership with America Makes, the power of smart digital tools within the AM production thread. Showcasing our 3Diax modular platform and MES for AM, you’ll be able to witness how our machine learning algorithms and automation tools can boost operational performance through the roof for each role within the pipeline.

WHERE: additive ETC, located on Level 3 of the West Building at McCormick Center.

Perspectives on AI and the Industry of the future (Authentise Weekly News-In-Review – Week 72)

The field of AI is nowadays established as a core industrial drive in any advanced country. Its wide-ranging applications make it a valuable asset in almost any kind of operation, enabling businesses with unparalleled, yet constantly improving performance. Today, in an industrial setting, AI is being used for process monitoring, data analysis and predictive modeling. It is not surprising to hear of new partnerships in a field such as oil and gas prospecting, where these capabilities can help predict maintenance periods and better process noisy sensor data. The same approach can be used for example in agriculture, where troves of data from a constellation of devices can provide new insights into operational efficiency. The potential for revenue and economic growth is enormous and the international competition is fiercer than ever. Countries such as India are putting resources towards entering a market led by the US and China, but you can definitely expect the list getting longer. How Manufacturing will use AI beyond predictive maintenance is completely open. We have some ideas. What will you do?

Total and Google to develop AI solutions for oil and gas exploration

Total has signed an agreement with Google Cloud for the joint development of artificial intelligence (AI) solutions to accelerate oil and gas exploration and production. Total Group senior vice-president and chief technical officer Marie-Noëlle Semeria said:

“Total is convinced that applying AI in the oil and gas industry is a promising avenue to be explored for optimising our performance, particularly in subsurface data interpretation.”

Check the full article here.

How Industrial AI Can Maximize the Potential of Agriculture’s Planting Season

Industrial AI improves the grower life cycle by turning mountains of otherwise unused ag data into meaningful intelligence. It works at machine scale by synthesizing information from different ag data sources – assets, sensors, weather, satellites, and other systems – and surfacing insights, predictions and recommendations growers can act on. Growers can use new intelligence gained from industrial AI seamlessly and autonomously in the context of their daily workflow to make smarter decisions.

Read it all at PrecisionAG.

India wants to fire up its A.I. industry. Catching up to China and the US will be a challenge

A tech start-up at its office in Gurgaon, India.

India has ambitions to fire up its artificial intelligence capabilities — but experts say that it’s unlikely to catch up with the U.S. and China, which are fiercely competing to be the world leader in the field. An Indian government-appointed task force has released a comprehensive plan with recommendations to boost the AI sector in the country for at least the next five years — from developing AI technologies and infrastructure, to data usage and research.

Read the full article here.

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Automation: going where humans can’t (or don’t want to) (Authentise Weekly News-In-Review – Week 59)

Automation is being employed to solve many of the challenges of the present day. In a sense, it is liberating us humans from menial or even dangerous tasks in favour of more stimulating exercises. For example, putting your life in the possibly dangerous environment of an ammunition factory was the only way for poor families to sustain themselves. Robotics and other technologies are not only putting unsafe jobs out of the list, are increasing productivity considerably. There are also societal changes that we are only now starting to foresee. Analyses show that certain dynamics are going to shift as demographic and economic factors evolve. For example, a number of countries with an aging population will need an increase in caregivers. Automation is already bringing to market solutions for human-machine relationship robots to take care of this. This trend is putting under the spotlight how technology is making certain jobs obsolete, inflating the already present preoccupation of joblessness. However, studies conducted by automation technologies show that however permeating these are, humans will not only always be required for complex and open-ended tasks, the new framework brought about by automation will create new jobs, such that never even existed before.

Robots Have Replaced Humans in 25% of China’s Ammunition Factories

Rifle bullets on wood table with low key scene. Close-up photo : Foto stock

Speaking with the South China Morning Post (SCMP), Xu Zhigang, a researcher with the Chinese Academy of Sciences’ Shenyang Institute of Automation, said that nearly 25% of China’s ammunition factories have had their human workers replaced with “smart machines.” Interestingly enough, China didn’t turn to AI simply because it wants to lead AI adoption. It was instead because the factories were lacking in people who actually wanted to work in such dangerous environments.

Keep reading here.

Can Robots Tighten the Bolts on a Rickety Caregiver Sector?

Can Robots Tighten the Bolts on a Rickety Caregiver Sector?

In 15 years, the percentage of the population over 65 will more than double in Europe, Japan and the U.S. A tenfold increase in care workers will be required, at a time when the sector is relentlessly shrinking. At first glance, this could be a perfect opportunity for robots to fill a genuine social need—entrepreneurs and tech evangelists frequently talk of machines tackling the “dangerous and demeaning work” of carrying and cleaning patients.

Read the full article here.

Could Self-Driving Trucks Be Good for Truckers?

White tractor-trailers

Uber does not believe that self-driving trucks will be doing “dock to dock” runs for a very long time. They see a future in which self-driving trucks drive highway miles between what they call transfer hubs, where human drivers will take over for the last miles through complex urban and industrial terrain. […] Basically, if the self-driving trucks are used far more efficiently, it would drive down the cost of freight, which would stimulate demand, leading to more business. And, if more freight is out on the roads, and humans are required to run it around local areas, then there will be a greater, not lesser, need for truck drivers.

“If you believe the [automation] narrative that’s out there today, it is especially counterintuitive,”Alden Woodrow, the product lead for self-driving trucks at Uber, says, “because the more self-driving trucks you have and the higher utilization they have, the more jobs it creates.”

Read the full article in the Atlantic.

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Automation is cause for unemployment, or is it? (Authentise Weekly News-In-Review – Week 43)

There’s been massive outcry recently regarding the shift in automation employment in various industries, threatening nearly 40% of jobs by 2030. Factories are quickly implementing new automated systems for warehouse management, manufacturing and most menial tasks. Taking away manual jobs from the market, many are complaining it’s eroding the economy as a whole in the process. In fact, some countries are relying on industries that are seeing a massive shift to automation, effectively truncating and undermining their workforce. This is most dangerous to those regions struggling to rise above the poverty line, where traditional factories are being replaced by automated performance power-houses. Nonetheless, the data is showing automation is not characterizing unemployment as we feared. This is all the more pronounced in those countries where institutions have been put in place to enable the pursuit of more future-oriented occupations. If we look back at ATMs in the ’70s, we will see a decline in the number of employees per branch but the new system encouraged companies to build more and more branches, mitigating the effect. All in all, while automation is having an impact on unemployment per se, new possibilities are being created to make a smarter, more efficient system possible while keeping the economy machine churning.

 

This Economic Model Organized Asia for Decades. Now It’s Broken

Today, Bangladesh, Cambodia, and Myanmar are in the early stages of climbing that ladder—but automation threatens to block their ascent. Instead of opening well-staffed factories in these countries, Chinese companies that need to expand are building robot-heavy facilities at home. “The window is closing on emerging nations,” says Cai Fang, a demographer in Beijing who advises the Chinese government on labor policy. “They will not have the opportunity that China had in the past.”

Keep reading at Bloomberg.

 

The rise of robots in the German labour market

Although robots do not affect total employment, they do have strongly negative impacts on manufacturing employment in Germany. We calculate that one additional robot replaces two manufacturing jobs on average. This implies that roughly 275,000 full-time manufacturing jobs have been destroyed by robots in the period 1994-2014. But, those sizable losses are fully offset by job gains outside manufacturing. In other words, robots have strongly changed the composition of employment by driving the decline of manufacturing jobs illustrated in Figure 1. Robots were responsible for almost 23% of this decline. But they have not been major killers so far when it comes to the total number of jobs in the German economy.

Read the full article here.

 

Chill: Robot-related job loss won’t be that bad (probably)

Chill: Robot-related job loss won’t be that bad (probably)

[…] the ATM was highly disruptive. You’d be tempted to equate this disruption with job loss, as fewer employees at bank branches meant thousands were suddenly without jobs.

But you’d be wrong.

Since ATMs made it much cheaper for banks to operate, it led to a boom, of sorts, in building new branches. From 1989 to 2004, banks opened 43% more physical locations than it did in the period before ATMs — leading to more jobs in banking, consequently.And that’s not even considering the additional skilled laborers needed to install, configure, and maintain over 400,000 ATMs installed nationwide since the 70s. Or, there’s the drivers and guards needed to fill them. There’s those who work in customer service, laborers who man the assembly lines, parts companies responsible for the pieces within them, ISPs (and their employees) who keep them online, security experts who lock down the network from hackers, and so on.

 

Read the full article at The Next Web.

 

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How the law can foster or hinder unprecedented industrial trends (Authentise Weekly News-In-Review – Week 42)

Uber’s current challenges in London and elsewhere show how governments and legislation can change the path of technology.

Industry 4.0 is no different. The technological trends that characterize the current industrial world have yet to be fully understood, both in terms of sheer research and in its spot within the law. Many issues are arising due to the intricately different nature of these technologies which pose new conundrums with regards to intellectual property (IP), operational and product safety standards and much more.

Nowhere this is more apparent than within the Industrial Internet of Things (IIoT) ecosystems, where its interconnected and decentralized nature makes it more susceptible to cyber-attacks and the new and overwhelming barrage of connected devices make the law-grounds much more difficult to thread. Is it all going too fast for legislators to keep up? It certainly seems so, as Southern China authorities have already issued the mandatory registration for all additive manufacturing industries citing “social security issues”. The trembling hand of these institutions, scrambling to grasp what they cannot entirely control, is starkly in contrast with many other countries where a race is on for the biggest slice of the innovation cake. They are putting together consortiums for the analysis and debugging of law-related issues and fostering the rise and gathering of activities which will, inevitably, spur consolidated operational standards, providing fertile grounds for them to grow.

How product safety will define the success of Industry 4.0/IIoT

Whilst safety protocols for IIoT equipment already exist within the Industrial Ethernet, from a product safety standardization perceptive, the challenges come when product advances outpace safety standards development. Then there’s the potential risk of fitting sensors to existing ‘redundant’ equipment to make these machines IIoT capable. In this scenario, the certified-design and safety parameters of the machine may be invalidated by making the device IIoT ready. Functional Safety for both hardware and software (to standard IEC 61508 and its associated standards) and Cybersecurity are also now defining factors when it comes to building in safety of an IIoT device. These aspects (and more) need to be carefully considered as early on in the design phase as possible.

Keep reading at Control Engineering Europe.

Chinese City Registers All Additive Manufacturing Industries To Ensure “Social Security”

Chongqing is an industrial and technological hub. Image via BASF.

Authorities in Chongqing, Southern China have announced that they will require all 3D printing companies based in the city to register with local police. Xinhua, China’s state news agency, reported that the objective of the measure is to both keep dangerous and illegal products from the public, whilst also controlling the production and sales of digital blueprints and data files for important specialist components.

Read the full article here.

The Industrial Internet Of Things (IIoT) And The Law

There has been surprisingly little attention given by the legal community to the issues and implications associated with the IIoT, either generally or within the utility industry. Discussion of the IIoT in the electric industry has been the province of operational and engineering experts. But IIoT operational and engineering challenges will inevitably present novel and difficult legal issues.

Read the full article at Mondaq.

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