IMTS: the present and future of manufacturing (Authentise Weekly News-In-Review – Week 89)

IMTS is now behind us! So much excitement that it’s hard to roundup. Our presence at the America Makes booth gave us an enhanced perspective of what the new manufacturing customer is looking for and the various exhibitors delivered a barrage of announcements and products. From the amazingly large INGERSOLL 140′ wide extrusion 3D printer to HP’s new Metal Jet productivity beast. IIoT was represented strongly as a means to automate operations, as was robotics and so much more.  Tough time choosing so below is also a video of a cool robot 😉

What was your favourite part of IMTS?

HP Metal Jet launches at IMTS 2018

Multinational information technology company HP has released HP Metal Jet 3D printing technology. Working on the same basis as its Multi Jet Fusion (MJF) binder jetting 3D printers, the new system marks HP’s first foray into the metal additive manufacturing sector.

Dion Weisler, CEO and President of HP Inc., comments, “We are in the midst of a digital industrial revolution that is transforming the $12 trillion manufacturing industry,”

Read more about it here.

Ingersoll showcases 3D printed winglet layup tool at IMTS

large 3D printer

Ingersoll Machine Tools Inc. showcased at this week’s International Manufacturing Technology Show (IMTS) Master Print, the company’s new large-format 3D printing technology with automatic attachment change to 5-axis CNC for aerospace-grade milling. The technology was developed in collaboration with Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). The part, says Ingersoll, weighs 430 lb/195kg and was printed in 6.5 hours. It was machined in 4.3 hours using the machine’s 5-axis technology. The material is ABS with 20% chopped carbon fiber reinforcement.

Check out the full article at CompositesWorld.

FANUC Display

 

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RAPID: AM Future in Mass Manufacturing (Authentise Weekly News-In-Review – Week 21)

This week was RAPID‘s week. The news outlets were populated with interesting announcements, from innovative processes to new products, pushing AM’s boundary even further. And there is one thing of which RAPID this year was a testament to: AM is going full-throttle towards mass manufacturing. As a prototyping technology it has far surpassed traditional production means and now the industry is betting big that it will permeate the factory plant of tomorrow. Through process and size improvements, production logistic systems and a software arsenal that is capable of effectively integrating AM within the manufacturing plant workflow, all the issues preventing AM to be utilized in a mass manufacturing environment will be dealt with. Manufacturing processes will go hybrid, symbiotically allowing us to achieve so much more. AM is the missing piece of the multitool of the future.

3D Hybrid Solutions with Multiax to launch “world’s largest metal 3D printer” at RAPID

The large format CNC machine made by Multiax. Image via 3D Hybrid Solutions.

 

3D Hybrid Solutions has announced it will launch a large-scale metal 3D printer at RAPID 2017 following a collaboration with CNC machining company Multiax. Based in Philadelphia, 3D Hybrid Solutions develops additive manufacturing tools for existing CNC machinery. The joint venture, which will be unveiled in Pittsburgh during the RAPID conference, combines this expertise with Multiax’s large-scale 5-axis CNC machines. Resulting in a machine which the company claims is “the world’s largest metal 3D printer” with a build chamber of “500 cubic meters.” According to 3D Hybrid Solutions, not only will the system be the largest metal 3D printer, it “will also be one of the fastest metal 3D printers with speeds beyond 20 pounds per hour.”

Read the full story here.

BLACKBELT unveils 3D printer on a conveyor belt for continuous FDM printing

The machine is perfect for creating large horizontal parts like signs. Photo via Blackbelt.

Aimed at producing large-scale, continuous prints and for series production, the Blackbelt machine brings a new way of thinking about 3D printing. Conveyor belts are often associated with factory production and it seems appropriate for Blackbelt’s device to incorporate this belt system. The Blackbelt 3D printer houses its 3 print heads on an X-Y actuation system, with the Z-axis in the form of a conveyor belt. This allows for theoretically infinite sized horizontal parts. The idea of infinite size is something Stratasys is addressing with its Infinite Build 3D printer. The device is currently undergoing testing at Ford Motors.

Read more here.

Innovative Uses of Geometric Search to Advance Additive Manufacturing

Assessing CAD data effectively and accurately is the first step to efficient and successful build processes. Many such processes, such as quoting, increasingly rely on cloud applications and require distribution of sensitive IP. For some industries that is unacceptable. Sending CAD data off-site can be the biggest roadblock to developing sophisticated process automation. As a solution, we apply existing geometric search algorithms to identify similar, white-listed designs that can be used in place of sensitive IP. By using a similar design that has been pre-screened for export we eliminate security issues. We’ve found that seamless, secure benchmarking and quoting operations are possible while maintaining strict security policies. In this presentation, we’ll discuss several potential use cases for geometric search including identifying previously fulfilled orders to compare the overall cost to produce or the ability to identify potential suppliers. We’ll also discuss drawbacks of using geometric search and limitations of our techniques. Tools such as geometric search have a variety of uses if used intelligently and can help businesses maintain control of sensitive IP.

 

Don’t forget to come back next week for another edition of the News-In-Review. Also, our Twitter account is very active, come check us out!

 

Week in Review: November 22nd to 27th – Collaborations Driving 3D

Hi and welcome to another Week-in-Review!

This week there is a treasure trove of evidence that partnerships and collaborations really do make a difference and show a rapidly maturing industry. This week’s examples go full spectrum: Renishaw and Dassault bang brains together trying to solve AM design and optimization issues, a collaboration between Auburn U and Nasa seeks to push the limits of space exploration even further through AM creating and another collaboration has designed and printed the best golf driver in the world.

Want to hear more? Here you go.

Renishaw and Dassault Systèmes pool expertise for the integrated AM experience

Screen Shot 2016-11-27 at 11.11.32 AM

Renishaw is collaborating with Dassault Systèmes, a world leading 3D modelling, simulation and industrial operations software provider, as part of its commitment to provide and enhance software for metal additive manufacturing (AM). “The 3DExperience platform coupled with QuantAM enables parts to be produced accurately from the outset, which is of tangible time and cost benefit to users. It marks the beginning of many enhancements we have in the pipeline to improve the AM user experience and streamline the front-end of the manufacturing process” explained Stephen Anderson, Renishaw’s Director of Group Software.

Read more here.

Auburn University and NASA sign Space Act Agreement on additive manufacturing

Lab

John Mason, Auburn’s vice president for research and economic development, recently signed a Space Act Agreement with Patrick Scheuermann, director of NASA’s Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville to explore additive manufacturing applications using metals, polymers and ceramics. “Great partnerships like this will help us get to places where we’ve never been before,” Scheuermann says. “We can make rockets like our predecessors did . . . but it’s really important to infuse additive manufacturing so that the Space Launch System is affordable and sustainable for decades to come.”

Read the full article here.

Subtractive and additive manufacturing combined to craft world’s most advanced golf driver

KD-1 final result_courtesy of Krone tot-LORE

Race car manufacturer, CRP Group and golfing manufacturer, Krone Golf have combined additive manufacturing and subtractive manufacturing techniques to craft what they believe is the world’s most advanced golf driver. The KD-1 is the first Windform SP 3D-printed driver clubhead with CNC machined titanium hitting surface. It is a composite driver clubhead where the different materials have a specific function and structural competence.

Read more about the driver here.

 

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