Fostering electronics development through 3D printing (Authentise Weekly News-In-Review – #126)

The field of electronics has been particularly prone to evolution in the past, with the shrinking of the circuitry and increasing of computational powers. However, it’s always been an inherently multi-step production process which reduces the opportunities for exploration into new shapes, material, and properties. 3D printing is beginning to apply its features to electronics as part of the multi-material printing push. This not only enables innovators to experiment much more freely with their PCBs, but iterations can also happen much more frequently. For testing purposes, this is the perfect combination. New satellites are being developed (and sent to the ISS) as well as new eco-friendly electronics that dissolve into the environment. For many companies, this is the means to a faster product development cycle for items that had to be ordered from China, shipped, tested and ordered anew with a few tweaks. The ability to print electronics in the lab is a very powerful tool.

International Space Station Will Test 3D-Printed Materials In Orbit

Nano Dimension's 3D printing process in action.

New 3D-printed materials are going to space thanks to a recently funded partnership between Israel’s NanoDimension and Florida’s Harris Corp. The companies plan to create new materials to reduce the manufacturing of small satellites, an exceedingly popular market right now for applications ranging from weather observations to remote surveillance.

Read the rest at Forbes.

Collaboration sparks sustainable electronics manufacturing breakthrough

IMAGE

Simon Fraser University and Swiss researchers are developing an eco-friendly, 3D printable solution for producing wireless Internet-of-Things (IoT) sensors that can be used and disposed of without contaminating the environment. SFU professor Woo Soo Kim is leading the research team’s discovery involving the use of a wood-derived cellulose material to replace the plastics and polymeric materials currently used in electronics.

Read the full article at EurekAlert.

NanoDimensions and Hensoldt Partner to Develop 3D Printed Sensor Technologies

The 3D printed radio frequency (RF) circuit board. Photo via Nano Dimension.

Israeli 3D printed electronics manufacturer NanoDimension has partnered with Hensoldt, a German-headquartered sensor technology specialist. The two companies will use the DragonFly electronics 3D printer to develop applications for Hensoldt’s security and defense division. Thomas Stocker, Hensoldt’s Head of Engineering, said,

“Our focus is on providing our customers with the highest quality cutting-edge innovations […] By using the DragonFly, we’ve already accelerated our application development.”

Read the full article at 3D Printing Industry.

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Week in Review: September 19th to 26th – AM Materials’ Expansion

Hello, welcome to another week in review brought to you by Authentise.

This week got a lot of buzz going for breakthroughs and materials bringing excitement to the world of AM: we got 3D printed cemented carbide tools courtesy of Fraunhofer Institute for Ceramic Technologies’ (IKTS) new binderjetting technique, bioengineered plastic spitting bacteria to supply future space missions and a whopping AM breakthrough in flexible thermoelectric devices which promises plummeting prices for coming IoT clothing and more.

Let us begin.

 

Fraunhofer IKTS develops 3D printed carbide tools with adjustable mechanical properties

Fraunhofer IKTS will present 3D printed cemented carbide (hard metal) tools at the World PM2016 Congress & Exhibition… IKTS scientists used a binder jetting 3D printing method to produce the tools. According to the researchers, these 3D printed tools are of comparable quality to those produced using conventional methods, and can be made into more complex shapes.

Read the full article here.

 

Bioengineered bacteria could be used to 3D print food and tools on Mars

cosmocrops d printing best picture the martian

A Danish research team is working on a synthetic biology project called CosmoCrops, which hopes to use bacteria to make it possible to 3D print everything needed for a respectable space mission, using a cutting-edge co-culturing system. To this end, the team has designed a special kind of bioreactor and has bioengineered bacteria that can be used to produce the necessary 3D-printing materials.

Read more at Digital Trend.

 

Nano Dimension paves way for wearables by 3D printing conductive patterns onto fabric

Israeli PCB 3D printing pioneer Nano Dimension has just successfully 3D printed conductive patterns made from silver nanoparticles onto specially treated fabric. This achievement, realized in collaboration with an unnamed leading European functional textiles company, paves the way for sensors and electronics that are actually part of your clothing. It proves that even functional and ‘smart’ fabrics, packed with sensors, are realistic possibilities and do not need to be limited by movement, folding or wearing.

Read the full article here.

 

Research explores thermoelectric screen printing

In work led by professor Yanliang Zhang at Boise State University, high-performance and low-cost flexible thermoelectric films and devices were fabricated by an innovative screen-printing process that allows for direct conversion of nanocrystals into flexible thermoelectric devices. Based on initial cost analysis, the screen-printed films can realize thermoelectric devices at 2-3 cents per watt, an order of magnitude lower than current state-of-the-art commercial devices.

Read more about the breakthrough at ScienceDaily.

 

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