How AM can Boost Manufacturing Economies (Authentise Weekly News-In-Review – Week 52)

AM is one of the technologies that are contributing to economic growth of countries across the globe. The factors at play are many: research centers bring innovation and business opportunities, businesses offer new products and services based on considerable investments, and so on. A UK review has pinpointed AM as one of the technologies that will grow its manufacturing economy to £455B over the next decade. It’s no surprise that governments are keen to keep the ecosystem thriving under the best conditions possible. This comes into play in a variety of ways: huge funds are being made available to invest in AM-related activities, govt. funded regulations and standards are being drafted (like the FDA guidance on 3D printing of medical products) and defense agencies are incorporating AM within their innovation initiatives. The fertile soil for manufacturing innovation will reward every country with the farsight to make it happen.


Additive manufacturing to play key role in £455bn UK manufacturing potential


A government-commissioned review on industrial digitalisation in the UK, has pinpointed additive manufacturing (AM) as one of the major innovations that could catapult the UK manufacturing economy to £455 billion over the next decade. The ‘Made Smarter’ report, led by Juergen Maier, CEO of Siemens UK, identifies a number of Industrial Digital Technologies (IDTs) including robotics, virtual reality and Internet of Things, as key areas of opportunity for the UK to increase growth in the manufacturing sector. Bringing together expertise from over 200 small businesses, universities and organisations including Additive Manufacturing UK, the 246-page review suggests that the UK stands to benefit from an additional 175,000 jobs and between 1.5 and 3% growth per year by adopting these technologies.

Read the full article at TCT Mag.

Statement by FDA Commissioner Scott Gottlieb, M.D., on FDA ushering in new era of 3D printing of medical products; provides guidance to manufacturers of medical devices

Once considered a futuristic technology on the distant horizon, 3D printing of medical devices, medications and human tissue is quickly becoming a promising reality. Patients have already benefitted from 3D printed medical products through access to personalized devices and innovative drugs that have led to significant health improvements. But the FDA is now preparing for a significant wave of new technologies that are nearly certain to transform medical practice. We’re working to provide a more comprehensive regulatory pathway that keeps pace with those advances, and helps facilitate efficient access to safe and effective innovations that are based on these technologies.

Read the full statement on the FDA website.


Government and 3D Printing: A New Line of Innovation to Protect

After realizing the boost 3D printing could deliver to manufacturing, the U.S. government increased funding for institutions researching AM technologies. In 2012 the federally funded National Additive Manufacturing Innovation Institute (NAMII) was launched — a $30 million pilot institute aimed at boosting 3D printing’s use in manufacturing. Also referred to as America Makes, the institute works with brilliant minds from industry, academia, and government. It is expected that these collaborations will help reduce the period of development between a lab’s proof-of-concept and commercial product. With the U.S. government investing more in AM and 3D printing techniques, governmental organizations are now starting to integrate the technology into their own processes.

Keep reading here.


This being the last News In Review before the festivities, we at Authentise wanted to wish you all a Merry Christmas!

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Integrating the Future & the Present (Authentise Weekly 3D News Review – Week 51)

Hi all, welcome to another (festive!) edition of the weekly review by Authentise!

We hope you had a merry Christmas time! As we go back to our usual day-to-day, we gathered last week’s juiciest 3D news. Many companies are tackling the issues of integrating their work on new tech into present standards and workflows. Sounds like Organovo’s work on pre-clinical bioprinting is finally getting there, Oas are standards for AM enabled medical. Other times industrialization doesnt need to be so complicated: IIoT allows smaller, incremental steps to be taken to integrate new tech and practices to benefit businesses.

Let’s dig in.

Organovo 3D bioprinted liver tissue could make it to the FDA by 2019

Organovo demonstrate toxicity testing with ExVive liver product. Image via Organovo

Speculation on 3D printed tissue coming to humans sooner than we think is backed by new pre-clinical findings from 3D bioprinting company Organovo. Though it will still be 3–5 years before the U.S. based Organovo apply for clearance of their liver tissue, that is still sooner than perhaps even the FDA had in mind. Pre-clinical trial data shows that 3D bioprinted liver tissue has been successfully planted into lab-bred mice. The human liver-cell tissue shows regular functionality and, at this stage, is being explored as a suitable patch for the organ.

Read more at 3D Printing Industry.

3D Printing Production Medical Devices — Pitfalls And Best Practices

In May 2016, the FDA released a draft guidance titled Technical Considerations for Additive Manufactured Devices. Any manufacturer or organization considering 3D-printed components during the development of a medical device should refer to this document. The guidance goes into detail regarding risk and other considerations related to 3D printing, as well as how to employ 3D printing within device development.

Read the article here and the FDA guidance here.

Use Existing Data to Optimize IIoT Sensor Deployment

It is hard to know where to start [in IIoT], and whether the solution being designed will be palatable to the end customer in terms of function and price. Rather than ordering highly marketed solutions from outside the enterprise and “tipping” consultants with exorbitant fees, they can find ingredients that are already on hand, apply basic analytics, and come up with some surprisingly tasty ways to translate raw data into process information to improve maintenance or business decisions.

Read about the useful, and easy, ways IIoT can easily be integrated in your business here.


We hope to see you next week for another edition brought to you by Authentise!