How digitizing the supply chain could save it, and the world (Authentise Weekly News-In-Review – #132)

The world of today is ripe with opportunities as well as problems to solve. Fortunately, we are now more equipped than ever before to address them, thanks to new technological tools that are changing the face of the supply chain. In the current state of political tensions and rising tariffs, digitized IPs and on-demand manufacturing through 3D printing could offer interesting new pathways to dealing with commerce. Similarly, IIoT technologies are being employed massively throughout the supply chain to tackle inefficiencies and operational awareness, where the food industry is already losing more than $150B to waste. Speaking of awareness, digital frameworks like the blockchain could give complete and transparent traceability to everything in our world, including where our products come from and their sources.

Want Relief From Tariffs And Trade Disruptions? It’s 3D Printing To The Rescue

USA and China trade war concept, cargo freight containers with flag.

The U.S.-China trade war drags on, with painful tariffs taking a chunk out of profits. Brexit promises more uncertainty in all regards, not only for the U.K. but for all of its trading partners—in essence, the whole world. One huge answer looks to be coming from the world of 3D printing, a.k.a. additive manufacturing (AM). […] it presents the possibility of shipping not parts or even finished goods across the world, but instead digital files. The results of that revolution could be even more staggering than those promised by the new production methods.

Read the full article at Forbes.

How the IIoT will make the cold chain smarter, safer and more efficient

Related image

Refrigeration-equipment malfunctions, long wait times in hot locations like loading docks, and a lack of cold-chain resources in developing agricultural markets all contribute to the problem. Analysts estimate that solving these cold chain problems could save the food industry $150 billion a year in waste alone. Wireless sensors can help by providing visibility at every point from farm to retailer. These sensors are small, inexpensive, and easy to use in packaging, shipping containers, trucks, and warehouses to measure temperature, humidity and other conditions that affect product quality.

Keep reading at Smart Industry.

Climate in the Digital Age

This age of innovation is marked by a 50% increase in greenhouse gases and carbon dioxide levels in our atmosphere since 1990.

This age of innovation is marked by a 50% increase in greenhouse gases and carbon dioxide levels in our atmosphere since 1990. We’ve seen a rise in the global surface temperature of approximately 1-degree Celsius above pre-industrial levels. One of the greatest benefits of blockchain is that it empowers communities to create its own solutions and incentivization systems, rather than looking toward a higher centralized power. The World Economic Forum provides a framework of potential solutions that could be born from blockchain technology.

Read more at Forbes.

Follow us on Twitter to keep updated on AM & IIoT related news as well as updates to Authentise’s services!

The Stock is Stuck in the Past: tech is changing the warehouse (Authentise Weekly News-In-Review – #129)

The entire supply chain is being redefined by transformative technologies, turning on their heads old notions of manufacturing and shipping. Change is coming from multiple angles, all aimed towards a single, common goal: making the warehouse obsolete. The main reason is to address a greater need for production agility, being locked down by large inventories of items that are expensive to maintain and risk getting surpassed before even being used. The future is geared towards high customization and rapid delivery. By inching additive manufacturing closer to being a production technology, items can be produced on-demand and in-situ, jumping over a large chunk of a logistical nightmare. Speaking of which, IIoT networks are making it easier than ever to analyze the data necessary to maintain a high operational awareness, enabling pro-active planning instead of reactive.

The Rise of the On-Demand Warehouse

In China the expectations are even more demanding [than Amazon’s] — JD.com (a huge Chinese online retailer) makes 90% of its deliveries within 24 hours, with 57% arriving within 12 hours. Experiences like this are delightful for the customer and fascinating for the investor. What allows such a supercharged supply chain to exist? What hurdles have to be overcome? And, more importantly, what are potential future opportunities and what would it take to get there?

Read the full article at Medium.

3D Printing Is Finally Ready For Its Close-Up

Selective laser melting, direct metal laser sintering, 3d printing, industry 4.0

Zero inventory” has been mostly unobtainable for manufacturers. But cutting-edge 3D printing technology is giving managers renewed hope. Carbon announced Tuesday it raised $260 million in growth funding. This San Francisco company is developing a platform executives claim will bring 3D printing to high-volume production. This would mean the end of inventories, and the beginning of new business models.

Keep reading at Forbes.

Why logistics scenarios matter for the future of the industrial IoT

A tanker at sea.

We will see faster speeds throughout the chain, which will become more efficient, convenient and sustainable by orders of magnitude. That’s because 5G will power the Industrial Internet of Things (IIoT), enabling large-scale, real-time connectivity all the time. What if all of these devices could interact with one another without human intervention? What would this type of constant connectivity look like at scale, in complex logistics operations, for example?

Read the full article at World Economic Forum.

 

 

Follow us on Twitter to keep updated on AM & IIoT related news as well as updates to Authentise’s services!

How AM can help fight climate change (Authentise Weekly News-In-Review – Week 34)

Climate change is caused by a great many aspects of human activity and one of the most impactful is manufacturing. In 2015, 21% of total greenhouse gasses emissions by the US was due to the industry sector. The manufacturing economy needs to be drastically reshaped in order to hamper the effects of climate change. Thankfully, technologies like AM are providing new avenues of production to do that. 3D printing enables production lines to be more flexible, reducing manufacturing to its most essential. Nonetheless, studies report that the energy consumption of some 3D printing methods are not up to their reputation, still needing some development in order to deal with material and energy usage. All the while, biopolymers are taking a hold in AM, proposing improved mechanical properties with the much needed value of being biodegradable.

 

Who Needs The Paris Climate Accords When You Have 3D Printing?

At the center of [digital manufacturing] technologies is 3D printing, which uses digital files to drive smaller, more flexible production lines than are economical with conventional manufacturing. 3D printing is still developing and is only now spreading to mass production. But in the next five to 10 years it should account for a sizable share of industry. As it matures, it will improve companies’ environmental performance in multiple ways.

Read the full article at Forbes.

 

Discovering Opportunities For Biopolymers In 3D Printing

[…] the few printable thermoplastics made from biological materials have limited applications, leading to concerns over environmental issues similar to those faced in conventional manufacturing. New biopolymers currently in development for conventional manufacturing can provide interesting opportunities for expanding biopolymer use in 3D printing applications.

Read the full article here.

 

3D Printing: A Boon Or A Bane?

Good prints require a ratio of 20– 50% virgin material to previously used powder to avoid problems, so a significant amount of waste is generated with each build. Another common claim is that 3-D printers are more energy-efficient than other manufacturing technologies. This claim is highly questionable because 3-D printers vary so dramatically in their energy use. A 2011 study measured the electricity use per kilogram of material deposited using several different 3-D printing methods and found that some printers used up to 80 times more energy than others.

Read the full report here.

 

Come back next week for another edition of the News In Review. Plus, keep an eye on our Twitter feed where we’ll share with you updates to our services as well as interesting AM / IIoT insights.

Our Autonomous, Decentralized Future (Authentise Weekly News-In-Review – Week 19)

Ever since the first applications in the Ford automotive pipeline, industrial automation has taken giant steps in assuring a both voluminous and efficient production process. Nonetheless, the centralized framework on which it has thrived does no longer provide an optimal economy for today’s hyper-connected society and infrastructure. Highly automated systems are being put in place to intelligently tackle manufacturing issues, capable of addressing objectives in a decentralized manner. IIoT is a prime example of this, where edge computing combines data collection, analysis and action outside the realm of influence of a central authority. An open source framework, coupled with a mix of microservices is a sound answer to what the future of industrial automation might be. Similarly, AM’s flexible nature is making it possible to rethink manufacturing operations. Small, low-cost machines can work autonomously and in parallel in order to manage various production orders intelligently. Even more farsightedly, Siemens envisions swarms of 3D printing robots capable of subdividing bigger prints into smaller units, working in-situ.

The Move to a Common Open IoT Framework

Loosely-Coupled Microservice Platform Architecture. Source: EdgeX Foundry

In order for the [IIoT] to truly take off, connecting devices to the cloud—or on the edge of the network— needs to be fast, easy and affordable. It is also important that the suppliers of automation technology embrace open standards so that these “things” are interoperable. […] This week, Opto 22 takes its commitment to open standards a step further with the announcement that it has joined The Linux Foundation as a silver level member. According to Opto 22, this strategic move is the company doing its part to “spearhead the adoption of open-source technology in the industrial automation and process control industries, and accelerate the rollout of Industrial Internet of Things application.”

Read more at Automation World.

Markforged plans large-scale digital metal manufacturing with 3D print farms

Sintering multiple 17-4 Stainless Steel Sprockets. Image via Markforged.

The future of metal 3D printing is in print farms says Markforged CEO, Greg Mark. While a number of companies are attempting to create machinery capable of industrial metal 3D printing, Greg Mark believes these “large-format metal printers will be replaced by smaller, low-cost machines working in parallel – print-farms.”

3D metal print-farms will shorten development time, closing the gap between prototyping and production.

Markforged intends to develop a system that allows for rapid production of strong metal parts. For Markforged, farming is the solution for large scale metal 3D printing production. Currently, 3D printing farms are mainly working with plastics.

Read more of their AM farm plans here.

Siemens Contemplating “Swarm” 3D Printing?

Siemens’ experimental production robot.

A report on Forbes details work undertaken by Siemens to develop a “mobile robotic 3D printer” concept. The curious-looking small robot was developed last year and since then has served as an experimental platform for developing software for future production use.

[…] some day, the same software that is helping the robotic spiders crawl the floor while avoiding obstacles and keeping their printing parts in balance could enable whole new systems of factory work – on tasks much more complex than assembling handheld toys.

For example, a team of robots could work together on a new kind of fuselage cylinder for airplanes. If each robot could attack the job from a different angle, they might build complex shapes together that no single printer could create by itself.

Read more about Siemens undertaking here.

 

Don’t forget to come back in a week time to read another edition of the News-In-Review right here at Authentise. Also, come by our Twitter profile to get more, unreported news.