How pioneer projects have laid the foundation for the true AM revolution (Authentise Weekly News-In-Review – Week 96)

In the beginning of the AM craze, everyone thought that the future of manufacturing was right around the corner. Once the storm had subsided and everyone was back to reality, most of the projects that had sparked at that moment were gone, but some endured. What was the difference between those which never made it past the news and those that are now solid industrial realities? For Nike, it was a matter of testing the market’s appetite and iterate on a product (and a production line) that worked. Its new line of 3D printed shoes is the heir of a project that’s year in the making and is eyeing mass production only after making sure that the path was true. Others saw in AM an opportunity to disrupt the established manufacturing infrastructure, and gradually implemented a new system, tried and tested to now enable to approach things differently. GE is one such case, one of the first to adopt AM and now it boasts one of the most extensive portfolios of applications in the field. However, sometimes a project needs the right fertile ground of established research to start growing. As NASA and Lockheed Martin constantly bring new aerospace parts to the testing grounds, proving the liability of AM in such a high-stake industry, new companies like Relativity Space hope to push the endeavor even further, by printing entire rockets. We are very grateful to those entrepreneurs who had the courage to jump into uncertainty, some to success some to failure, and make the world of AM what it is today.

Nike’s 3D Printed Elite Shoe Preparing For A Wider Release

The Zoom VaporFly Elite Flyprint 3D. Image via Nike
Nike’s 3D printed shoe Zoom VaporFly Elite Flyprint 3D will soon get a wider release. The Flyprint 3D is the updated version of the famous 3D printed Nike Zoom Vaporfly 4%, designed with the help of Eliud Kipchoge, winner Berlin marathon 2018. The Beaverton-based footwear giant has worked to perfect the Vaporfly 4% since last year. For this purpose, the company once again recruited the help of Kipchoge. The Zoom Vaporfly is called “4%” because an independent research found that Vaporfly wearing runners can gain 4% of the lead time on their competitors.

Read the full article here.

GE Transportation To Introduce 250 3D Printed Locomotive Parts By 2025

According to reports in UK rail industry authority the Railway Gazette GE is looking to apply additive manufacturing to components for its locomotives. If all goes according to plan, this could mean that in the next seven years GE Transportation will have an inventory of up to 250 3D printed train components. A pilot initiative for 3D printing at GE Transport is underway as part of its Brilliant Factory model, combined with analytics and lean manufacturing in a Digital Thread.

Read more here.

Relativity Space’s Quest To 3D Print Entire Rockets

Even NASA has been dipping their proverbial toe in the additive manufacturing waters, testing printed parts for the Space Launch System’s RS-25 engine. It would be safe to say that from this point forward, most of our exploits off of the planet’s surface will involve additive manufacturing in some capacity. But one of the latest players to enter the commercial spaceflight industry, Relativity Space, thinks we can take the concept even farther. Not content to just 3D print rocket components, founders Tim Ellis and Jordan Noone believe the entire rocket can be printed. Minus electrical components and a few parts which operate in extremely high stress environments such as inside the pump turbines, Relativity Space claims up to 95% of their rocket could eventually be produced with additive manufacturing.

Read the full article here.

 

We’ll be at Formnext in Frankfurt from the 13th to 16th November. Come see us at booth #B30J.

Follow us on Twitter to keep updated on AM & IIoT related news as well as updates to Authentise’s services!

Key Reasons AM is Headed to Manufacturing: Price, Tools & Pilots (Authentise Weekly News-In-Review – Week 91)

AM has moved from a technology limited to prototyping to a full-fledged game changer in manufacturing. This change didn’t happen overnight and we can trace its recent success on a few key advances that enabled it to become more approachable and employable. First, metal AM machines are coming down in price drastically, making the technology more affordable to businesses at a sub $500K price tag. Hybrid manufacturing equipment is incorporating AM to leverage its potential while compensating its shortcoming with traditional tools to finish the job, making the jump into AM less restrictive. Ultimately, but not less important, companies are finally coming out of their pilot projects with positive results and are keen to delve deeper into their investments and scale their operations.

HP’s Metal Jet 3D printer may build your next car’s innards

DmxNkvRW0AAU5Tj

A number of companies offer metal 3D printing, which creates products and components layer by layer with a computer-controlled system tracing its lineage to ordinary inkjet printers. But on Monday, printing giant HP announced it’s entered the market with the ambition to dramatically lower prices, courtesy of a $400,000 product called the Metal Jet.

“We’re really going to enable mass production for mainstream metals, in particular steels,” said Tim Weber, head of 3D metal printing for HP.

Read more at CNET.

Hybrid Manufacturing & The Future of 3D Printing for Production

[…] much like 3D printing, the potential benefits of hybrid manufacturing have made some early adopters very optimistic about the technology’s future prospects. Michael Sealy, assistant professor of mechanical and materials engineering at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln is one of them.

“Additive really opens up the doors in terms of being able to print your own mechanical properties layer-by-layer or zone-by-zone,” he said. “That’s one of the big advantages, so I see hybrid AM exploding in the next few years just because of all that potential.”

Read more here.

GE Transportation To Introduce 250 3D Printed Locomotive Parts By 2025DoSo6x6XkAAgjqC

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

According to reports in UK rail industry authority the Railway Gazette GE is looking to apply additive manufacturing to components for its locomotives. If all goes according to plan, this could mean that in the next seven years GE Transportation will have an inventory of up to 250 3D printed train components.

A pilot initiative for 3D printing at GE Transport is underway as part of its Brilliant Factory model, combined with analytics and lean manufacturing in a Digital Thread.

 

We’ll be at Formnext in Frankfurt from the 13th to 16th November. Come see us at booth #B30J.

Follow us on Twitter to keep updated on AM & IIoT related news as well as updates to Authentise’s services!

Quality assurance will guarantee AM’s future (Authentise Weekly News-In-Review – Week 25)

AM is transforming the way engineers approach a design problem with enhanced manufacturing possibilities. Nonetheless, there are some crucial steps that need to be taken in order to make AM safe and reliable enough to meet industry standards. Already the scene is making giant strides in its effort to assure quality and the main areas to consider are three: CAD models preparation, AM material inspection and in-print monitoring. Better hardware and dedicated software by Nvidia is making dealing with complex designs much more efficient, unconstrained by performance issues and with new tools to approach AM-specific design issues. Powder micro-structure needs to be within certain parameters for optimal sintering: Carnegie Mellon developed a machine-vision system to classify AM metal powders. For in-print monitoring, GE published new patents to determine the quality of a print from acoustic signatures during the process.

Authentise has developed platforms that take advantage of every major monitoring device. Companies like Nike and Ricoh are using this data-enriched perspective to make smarter decisions on their manufacturing operations.

Read more about it here!

How GPUs Can Kick 3D Printing Industry Into High Gear

GVDB Voxels printed a 3D statue (L) of a complex image (R) with minimal materials and structural support.

At last month’s GPU Technology Conference, HP Labs and NVIDIA described how they’ve worked together to overcome these challenges using NVIDIA’s new GVDB Voxel open source software development kit. […] Hoetzlein said the SDK is designed for simple efficient computation, simulation and rendering, even when there’s sparse volumetric data. It includes a compute API that generates high-resolution data and requires minimal memory footprint, and a rendering API that supports development of CUDA and NVIDIA OptiX pathways, allowing users to write custom rendering kernels.

Read more on NVIDIA’s blog.

Carnegie Mellon develops machine vision autonomous system for metal 3D printing

Assessing the powders at the CMU lab. Photo via CMU College of Engineering.

Research from Carnegie Mellon University’s (CMU) College of Engineering has developed an autonomous system for classifying the metal powders used for 3D printing. Using machine vision technology, the system can identify specific microstructures in the additive manufacturing metal powders with an accuracy of greater than 95%. Metal powders are used in powder bed fusion 3D printers. Understanding the quality of the material is essential to the integrity of the resulting parts. The CMU engineers expect their system to be applied by the 3D printing industry within the next five years as part of the Carnegie Mellon University’s NextManufacturing Center aims.

Read the full article here.

GE publishes patents for powder bed fusion acoustic monitoring processes to qualify metal 3D printed parts

Direct Metal Laser Melting solution from GE Additive. Photo via GE Reports/Chris New

GE has published two patents for additive manufacturing acoustic monitoring processes. Referring specifically to powder-bed fusion techniques, GE hopes to simplify the qualification of printed parts with an in-situ monitoring method using acoustic waves. In turn, the company intends to improve the workflow of 3D printing functional metal parts. […] According to the patent, the acoustic monitoring process may take place upon completion of the build or it, “may take place in real time.” It uses a “known good” (fig. 4)workpiece as comparison, which means the acoustic profile generated by the sensors is compared to the profile of the already qualified part.

Read more about the patent here.

 

Don’t forget to come back next week for another News-In-Review and to check our Twitter feed for more AM and IIoT related news and Authentise service updates!

Week in Review: November 15th to 21st – Industry 4.0 is HERE, Let’s Not Ignore It

Hey everyone, welcome to another Week in Review brought to you by Authentise.

Within the manufacturing industry it’s not always easy to spot the next transformative trend. Within the industry 4.0 we still have lot of ground to cover but the direction is clear: less human employment, higher throughput and much smarter management and upkeep. Nonetheless there are many who sweep the news under the rug and foresee more jobs coming in the near future or dismiss entirely the possibility of such a scenario to be of import to them.

We make the case that industry 4.0 is not only coming, it’s already here. What we once achieved with 25 employees we now do faster with 5. The sheer volume of data that we gather from our manufacturing operations is making it impossible to address it any other way. Let’s embrace the new technologies that will make our business perform better and faster and prepare the next generations to think of manufacturing in terms of interconnectedness and data.

Here are some news to pique your interest.

Manufacturing Jobs Aren’t Coming Back

Screen Shot 2016-11-22 at 10.12.11 AM

Pundits will debate the wellsprings of Donald Trump’s election triumph for years. The decades-long decline of U.S. manufacturing employment and the highly automated nature of the sector’s recent revitalization should also be high on the list of explanations. The former is a source of the working-class rage that helped get Trump elected. The latter is the main reason Trump won’t be able to “make America great again” by bringing back production jobs. Employment in the sector plunged from 18.9 million jobs to 12.2 million [in the last 30y]… More generally, the “job intensity” of America’s manufacturing industries—and especially its best-paying advanced ones—is only going to decline. In 1980 it took 25 jobs to generate $1 million in manufacturing output in the U.S. Today it takes five jobs.

Read the full article at MIT Technology Review.

 

IIoT: From Chaos to Order

Beth Comstock, vice chair at GE, recalled a time not so long ago when corporate executives smirked at the concept of the business value of streaming media. They laughed at the idea of exchanging “analog dollars for digital pennies”. But that’s exactly what happened in television as the industry reshaped itself around the streaming concept and, as a result, digital pennies became digital dollars. This same shift is coming to industry, Comstock said.

Keep reading here.

 

GE Additive to invest $10 million in two educational programmes

GE Additive have today announced a $10 million investment across five years in two educational programmes aimed at developing future talent in additive manufacturing. The additive specialists believe enabling educational institutions to provide access to 3D printers will help accelerate the adoption of additive manufacturing worldwide. “We want to build an ecosystem that drives additive manufacturing across multiple industries,” said Mohammad Ehteshami, Vice President of GE Additive. “GE is committed to this space for the long-term. A new world is coming and we want future generations to have exposure to it from an early age.”

Read more at TCT Magazine.

 

Also, check out the HUGE 3Diax Manufacturing Execution System announcement we made this week!

Subscribe to our mailing list

* indicates required


Also receive our weekly News-in-Review?

Week in Review: November 8th to 14th – Incoming Data Tsunami

Hello, this week we got to witness the power of data on present businesses and good look at what our future has in hold. Information is not only increasing, it’s coming from more devices, in various formats and in very high bandwidths. Every business has to consider how to manage this complex and messy data tsunami. The prize is lucrative: GE foresees that IIoT will increase global GDP by $10-$15 trillion over the next 20 years. At the same time plug & play IoT solutions are making it easier to reap the benefits of networks of sensors and new ways to create and interact with information, digitalizing the world around us, are lowering the bar to enter this world.

There’s a lot to cover in this week’s edition, so let’s get to it.

IIoT could boost GDP by $15 trillion, though data barriers remain

GE research predicts [IIoT] will help generate a $10-$15 trillion boost in global GDP over the next 20 years. Bit Stew Systems commissioned a survey of top IT executives on their readiness for the IIoT revolution. 80% saw the top benefits of IIoT technology as enhanced operating efficiency and uptime. Despite these benefits, 70% are only in the planning phase of integrating IIoT technology. 70% of those surveyed said that proven data modeling and mapping capabilities were the most important aspect of an IIoT platform. However, 64% said that the biggest IIoT challenge stems from difficulties integrating data from a variety of formats and sources, as well as problems extracting business value.

Read the data rich article at ReadWrite.

Plug and play mesh IoT sensor system unveiled

Vicotee AS, part of the Virinco Group of Norway, released at the show a plug-and-play IoT sensor system based on the Smartmesh IP from Linear Technology. The Vicotee system includes Njord sensor modules, the Bifrost gateway, and cloud services for collecting data and managing devices, and operates out of the box collecting temperature, ambient light, humidity, and accelerometer data. The system may well help ease industry’s path to the IIoT.

Read more here.

Microsoft’s 3D Plans and How They May Affect Everyone Else

A 3D scanning concept from Microsoft

In their most recent OS, Windows 10, the company has just provided a series of interesting 3D software tools. The first and most important [effect] is that a great deal more people will be directly exposed to 3D technology. By including this stuff with their software, many more people will bump into it. Secondly, those using the 3D tools will become accustomed to the idea of 3D. The result will be many more 3D-enabled people on the streets of the future. Finally, Those who created systems for providing simple 3D modeling or scanning may suddenly find themselves short customers, because some folks simply found what they needed with Microsoft.

Keep reading at Fabbaloo.

 

This week we will be roaming Formnext‘s booths, see you there!

Remember to sign up to our newsletter to get more juicy news on Authentise services.

Subscribe to our mailing list

* indicates required


Also receive our weekly News-in-Review?

Week in Review: November 1st to 7th – Performance through Innovation

Hello everyone, here we go with another Week in Review.

This week we had a clear view at what AM can provide in terms of performance. Through new technologies and collaborations, we are seeing a future in which certain tasks simply couldn’t be accomplished in any other way. GE is testing a prototype engine with 35% AM parts, from 855 to just 12 with improved performance, Lockheed Martin explains how the company incorporated 3D printing to become world’s largest defense contractor and a collaboration between SSL and TUI will see a demonstration of kilometric structures in space through AM satellites. Additive solutions are driving performance parts in every industry:

GE unveils 35% 3D printed ATP engine: ‘more additive parts than any engine in aviation history’

General Electric (GE) has tested a demonstrator engine with 35% additive manufactured parts. The engine was made to validate 3D printed parts for the clean-sheet design Advanced Turboprop (ATP) engine … The all-new lightweight components for the ATP will contribute to a 5% weight reduction, as well as a 1% improvement in specific fuel consumption (SFC). 855 subtractive manufactured parts will be reduced to 12 additive parts, with those 12 making up 35% of the total part count.

Read more here.

Lockheed Martin Looks to Catch Up in 3D Printing

Lockheed Martin is making titanium propellant tanks for satellites using a Chicago company’s electron beam additive manufacturing technology.

Robert Ghobrial, additive manufacturing lead for the company’s training and simulation location in Orlando, FL, spoke at SME’s “Additive Manufacturing Applications: Innovations for Growth” seminar in October, at advanced energy technology accelerator NextEnergy, in Detroit. He traced his work with 3D printing back to 2012, when his team received some MakerBot printers that largely went unused. Along the way, Ghobrial coined the phrase, “The 5Ps of Additive Manufacturing™,” a manufacturing model that describes how AM can help aerospace, defense and other businesses.

Read more about it at Advanced Manufacturing.

“Trusselator” puts additive manufacturing into orbit

Tethers Unlimited Inc’s (TUI) Firmamentum division have announced a collaboration with Space Systems Loral (SSL) that will allow them to demonstrate their on-orbit manufacturing technology, specifically for building kilometer scale space systems. According to TUI, the primary benefit of this on-orbit fabrication is the improved packing efficiency and system mass, which basically means that [companies] can save trips to space by launching highly concentrated fabrication material instead of built on earth structures that have to be deployed in space.

Read more about the collaboration here.

 

As always, remember to keep updated with our latest Week in Review by signing up to our newsletter!

Subscribe to our mailing list

* indicates required


Also receive our weekly News-in-Review?

Week in Review: Sept 5th to 11th – GE in the game!

Hello and welcome back to another Week in Review!

This has been a HUGE week for GE as it rocked the 3D printing market bidding $1.4 billion for the acquisition of SLM Solutions and Arcam. Its push into the AM market has been a driving force in the industry for years and now it’s looking to become the one actively pulling the strings. Here’s a good review of the deal. On the side we have exciting news coming from R&D around the world: telecommunications will soon get a major boost from 3D printed fiber optic tips and South Korea puts yet another 3D printed implant advancement in its wide ranging surgical arsenal.

Let’s get to it.

 

GE bidding $1.4B for Arcam and SLM, speeds up 3D printing push

The logo of General Electric is shown at their subsidiary company GE Aviation in Santa Ana, California April 13, 2016. REUTERS/Mike Blake - RTX2E4CJ

General Electric launched bids on Tuesday to buy two of the world’s top makers of machines for metal-based 3D printing – Sweden’s Arcam and Germany’s SLM Solutions – for a total $1.4 billion to bolster its position in the fast-growing technology. “Additive manufacturing will drive new levels of productivity for GE, our customers, including a wide array of additive manufacturing customers, and for the industrial world,” GE Chief Executive Jeff Immelt said in a statement.

Read more about the acquisition here.

 

Researchers devise method for 3D printing complex structures on micro optical fibers

A joint team of researchers have developed a new and innovative method for 3D printing minuscule but highly complex structures on tips of optical fibers, which have diameters as small as 125 micrometers. … “The development of this new technology offers many advantages in terms of reproducibility, flexibility in the design of optical structures, as well as cost” – Keiko Munechika, co-authore of the study.

Read the full article at 3ders.

 

Korea develops new 3D printed facial implants

image: nanjixiong

Professor Yoon Won-soo from Korea Polytechnic University  have developed a new biodegradable 3D printed implants’ material which will not only greatly avoid any complications but could also accelerate the regeneration of natural tissue. We’ve been using patients’ own bones to produce the implant for quite a long time, which could cause damage to the patient. This new material, however, could be made into satisfactory implants directly and is easier to implant with only two hours’ printing time compared to the original eight hours.

Read all about it here.

 

Authentise is sponsoring the Additive Manufacturing Conference 2016 this year. Check it out!

 

Subscribe to our mailing list

* indicates required


Also receive our weekly News-in-Review?