Bespoke solutions to today’s problems (Authentise Weekly News-In-Review – #133)

3D printing gives companies access to a variety of features previously extremely hard to get or even impossible. One of the most exciting ones comes from its intrinsic manufacturing agility. 3D printing not only enables custom-made product manufacturing, it opened Pandora’s box of possibilities in bespoke solutions to our present and future challenges. Scan-based 3D printed helmets are the tip of the iceberg of where we can push this concept. Patient-specific medical implants and bioprinting are already being developed to address and further reduce rejection and failure rates. The path ahead is brimming with possibilities, of AI-driven 3D printing robots, applying their smarts to repairing failing infrastructures or even coral reefs with bespoke 3D printing solutions. This and much more will make traditional manufacturing terribly limiting and singleminded.

Custom 3D Printed HEXR Cycling Helmets Are Now Shipping To Customers

3D printed Hexo helmets. Photo via Hexo Helmet.

HEXR helmets, the custom 3D printed bicycle helmets formerly known as HEXO, has now begun shipping to customers. […] The HEXR helmet features a 3D printed honeycomb core, produced using SLS 3D printing technology and Polyamide 11 from leading industrial 3D printer manufacturer EOS. Each helmet is 3D printed according to the measurements of the user, acquired through a 3D scanning app, in order to create a lightweight and protective headgear solution catered to the customer.

Read more on 3D Printing Industry.

 

3D printing could meet rising demand for heart valves

artificial heart valves

If Swiss researchers have their way, artificial heart valves could simply come out of 3D printers in future. Switzerland’s Federal Institute of Technology (ETHZ), along with South African company Straight Access Technologies (SAT) has developed a silicone replacement for the heart valves used today. However, it will take at least ten years before the custom-made artificial heart valves can be used. Experts expect that in the coming decades the demand for artificial heart valves will increase sharply in large parts of the world. This is due to aging, lack of exercise and poor nutrition. Replacement heart valves from the 3D printer could help meet this demand.

Read the full article at Swissinfo.

 

GXN proposes underwater 3D printers to repair the cracks in our planet

GXN proposes underwater 3D printers to repair the cracks in our planet

GXN innovation has unveiled research that suggests using autonomous, robotic 3D printers to fix the cracks in the infrastructure of our planet. its proposal ‘break the grid’ imagines a near future where global challenges such as damaged coral reefs and the thermal envelopes of high-rises are fixed with such devices.

‘freeing 3D printers to meet these challenges could be a revolution in the making,’ says Kasper Jensen, founder of GXN. ‘by enabling 3D printing robots to crawl, swim, and fly, we can address pressing environmental threats around the world at lower cost and with greater efficiency.’

Read more at Designboom.

 

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3D Printing is a Biomedical Dream (Authentise Weekly News-In-Review – Week 101)

When it comes to the biomedical industry, there are key features of 3D printing which make it an ideal candidate for pushing it further. For starters, the complete customizability of its products, which is critical for anatomically unique physiques. Secondly, the technology’s accessibility helps bring these applications to a wider population, surpassing more cost-prohibitive options that may yet be less accurate. And thirdly, its ability to decentralize manufacturing for medical tools and resources is enabling us to provide for those locations far from traditional manufacturing infrastructure, from warzones to even space.

 

3D printed biosensor shows promise for glucose monitoring

WSU glucose monitoring biosensor

Researchers from Washington State University have developed a 3D printed biosensor for monitoring glucose. The innovative research could offer diabetes patients a more accessible and effective means of keeping track of their glucose levels.

Read more at 3D Printing Media Network.

 

Predicting Leaky Heart Valves with 3D Printing

Predicting Leaky Heart Valves with 3D Printing

Researchers at the Wyss Institute for Biologically Inspired Engineering at Harvard University have created a novel 3D printing workflow that allows cardiologists to evaluate how different valve sizes will interact with each patient’s unique anatomy before the medical procedure is actually performed.

Read more here.

 

Organs grown in space: Russian scientists 3D-print mouse’s thyroid on ISS in world first

Organs grown in space: Russian scientists 3D-print mouse’s thyroid on ISS in world first

Medical research has taken a leap into the future as Russian scientists have managed to grow a mouse’s thyroid in zero gravity using a 3D bioprinter on the International Space Station (ISS). And human organs may be next in line. Invitro says that maturation of printed organs and tissues in zero gravity occurs much faster and more efficiently than on Earth.

Read more here.

 

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