Security & Systematic issues in wake of IIoT (Authentise Weekly News-In-Review – Week 12)

Hello to our dear readers, welcome to the latest edition of News-In-Review!

IIoT is a term dense of meanings and implications. A lot of businesses see in its wake the possibility of unprecedented ROIs and some are already putting down the foundations to implement it in their proceedings. However, before obtaining the many benefits of data analytics, the proper system has to be put in place. One that needs to improve upon a pre-existing industrial network, fixing it’s outdated vulnerabilities, without the need for a complete overhaul. One that is able to withstand a growing risk of DDOS attacks from a growing number of sources thanks to the sensors riddled world we are constructing. And lastly, but not least, one that can assure quality processes and control of every step of the process chain.

If this is a topic you’re interested in, and want to dig in further, our CEO and CTO have written a chapter for Springer’s new “Cyberphysical Security for Industry 4.0” – due May 10.

Here’s this week news:

Forgotten factors that could take down IIoT

When it comes to IoT adoption in the industrial space, I’ve often found that operators worry about how they’re going to run before they can even walk. What this means is industrial operators let certain barriers to entry — primarily security and availability — keep them from even starting on their path to IIoT. In reality, there are certain key steps that industrial companies need to take well before they even attempt that transition.

Read more about these steps here.

Security Professionals Expect More Attacks On IIoT in 2017

Screen Shot 2017-03-18 at 12.28.16 AM

As technology vendors race to create more and more devices connected to the Internet of Things (IoT) the opportunity for hackers to get into these devices grows larger and larger, as these IoT devices are usually made with little to no regard for security. The fears of a large-scale attack waiting to happen were solidified this week when security firm Tripwire released the results of a study it performed about the rise of industrial IoT deployment in organizations, and to what extent it is expected to cause security problems in 2017.

Read the article and study at Onthewire.

Control is the key factor for implementing additive manufacturing in industry

According to the UK’s Manufacturing Technology Centre (MTC), control is the key factor for the implementation of additive manufacturing in an industrial setting. Speaking at today’s Additive World conference […] the MTC’s David Wimpenny explains the most important obstacles additive manufacturing needs to address. They created the National Centre for Additive Manufacturing two years ago, as a visualization of how they expect an additive manufacturing ‘factory of the future’ would look. However, Wimpenny is keen to stress it is not about the number of parts produced in the factory, but about control of the processes. Control of the quality and control of the data is the most important consideration for Wimpenny. As he says, “In a process chain, whatever you don’t control will be a problem”.

Read more here.

 

Don’t forget to follow us on Twitter and to come back in a week time to get a new glimpse at the future of AM, IIoT and all things in between!

Industry of Things World USA

Industry of Things World USA is an international knowledge exchange platform bringing together more than 500 high-level executives who play an active role in the Industrial Internet of Things scene.

IIoT engulfs the world, is the world ready? (Authentise Weekly News-In-Review – Week 04)

Hi everyone and welcome to this new edition of your weekly News-In-Review by Authentise!

We are switching the release date to Sunday from now on so tune in every weekend to get your curated news report.

This week we filled our feeds with news coming from the IIoT world. More & more resources are poured by industrial players to get ahead in the race to ride the sensor-empowered wave of IIoT but there is more to do hiding in the avalanche of data that is coming out of it. While Frankfurt showcases industry 4.0 in its privileged spot as Europe’s main internet hub and key players’ collaborations take the IIoT ecosystem up a notch, the data shows early adopters can’t seem to create actionable insights out of it all. As IIoT engulfs the industrial world in data, smart process development driven by analytics is key to make use of the incredible information capacity in our hands.

Frankfurt factory showcases Industry 4.0

Screen Shot 2017-01-21 at 12.37.28 AM

Frankfurt is the world’s largest internet hub – and with volume doubling every year, companies are turning to the latest technology. That was the starting point for one German company – which has built a factory to show what’s possible.

Click here to see the article and video.

Honeywell and Aeron collaborate

Honeywell has announced that it will collaborate with Aereon on solutions to help industrial customers boost the safety, efficiency and reliability of their operations by leveraging Honeywell’s Industrial Internet of Things (IIoT) ecosystem. The INspire™ ecosystem is a part of Honeywell’s Connected Plant initiative, which helps manufacturers leverage the IIoT to improve the safety, efficiency and reliability of operations across a single plant or several plants within an enterprise. Honeywell and its ecosystem partners are developing infrastructure that offers customers secure methods to capture and aggregate data, and apply advanced analytics. Customers can then use this information to determine methods to reduce or eliminate manufacturing upsets and inefficiencies.

Click here to read more about the collaboration.

Making Sense of IIoT Analytics

Screen Shot 2017-01-21 at 12.48.05 AM

As the Industrial Internet of Things (IIoT) picks up steam, attention is pivoting from connectivity to analytics, flooding manufacturers with a wave of new offerings that all promise to facilitate real business change. […] “It’s really easy to capture data, but to then make that data actionable is where companies are really struggling,” notes Ryan Lester, director of IoT strategy for Xively, an IoT platform provider. “Companies don’t have the right analytics tools to parse through the data and they don’t have access to good algorithms to get insights.” In fact, according to research by Forrester and Xively, 51% of companies are collecting data from connected products, but only 33% are leveraging the intelligence to create actionable insights.

Click here to know more of IIoT analytics.

 

Don’t forget to follow us on Twitter, Facebook and G+!

Facing New Dynamics With Technology (Authentise Weekly News-In-Review – Week 03)

Hi and welcome to another edition of the News-In-Review!

On the eve of President-elect Trump’s inauguration, dozens of companies are announcing that they are keeping manufacturing jobs in the US, creating them, or bringing it back: Ford, Alibaba, and Amazon among them. In fact, this is a long term trend: We highlighted a FastCompany article that revealed that apparel manufacturing in the US went up by 35% since 2009. But why? It’s not because customers are expecting improved personalization options (they’re not really), and it doesn’t seem to be about taking advantage of new technologies such as 3D printing. Instead, we think it’s the need to stay agile to consumer needs, and that’s best done by empowering your operators with the new opportunities cloud+data provide. Read our CEO’s latest LinkedIn post below and find out more.

The Uneasy Truth Behind Amazon’s Hiring Blitz And What Startups Are Doing To Fix It

Today, Amazon announced that it will create 100,000 full-time, full-benefit jobs in the United States over the next 18 months. The jobs, Amazon says, will range from entry-level positions to software development roles. The announcement is designed to play nicely into President-elect Trump’s rhetoric about bringing more jobs back to our shores, but it’s important to remember that Amazon’s business model is premised on increasing automation wherever possible, which means replacing more and more humans with machines.

Read the full article at FastCompany.

The dream of Ara: Inside the rise and fall of the world’s most revolutionary phone

In a very personal and thorough recollection of the bold project of modular phone Ara we get a glimpse into how AM was scrapped from the manufacturing plans. “[Paul] Eremenko cut ties with one of Ara’s earliest supporters, 3DSystems, scrapping the project’s dependence on rapid 3D printing for a dye sublimation process. 3DSystems’ printers were too slow, and the new system could adorn modules with selfies and pets.”

Read the full story here.

Trust your People.

People who run manufacturing, sales, logistics or many other core functions in supply chain know how important their team members are: How much they know, how many ideas they have to drive more efficient operations – yet how they have long been stifled by rules, ignored by managers and brushed aside by support staff. No wonder people become demoralised. Modern software tools should be providing relief. Alas, the most recent industrial IoT examples such as GE’s Predix show that this trend looks set to continue. Data Scientists lead IoT projects that get the data to tell them where the problems are rather than asking the people on the front line what stops them from being better at their job. Their findings are enshrined in IT systems as rules not to be tampered with. IIoT is the buzzword, but we are not sure that people are looking at it the right way.

Read the full article on LinkedIn.

 

Don’t forget to follow us on Twitter to get all the share-worthy news related to the 3D printing world!

Integrating the Future & the Present (Authentise Weekly 3D News Review – Week 51)

Hi all, welcome to another (festive!) edition of the weekly review by Authentise!

We hope you had a merry Christmas time! As we go back to our usual day-to-day, we gathered last week’s juiciest 3D news. Many companies are tackling the issues of integrating their work on new tech into present standards and workflows. Sounds like Organovo’s work on pre-clinical bioprinting is finally getting there, Oas are standards for AM enabled medical. Other times industrialization doesnt need to be so complicated: IIoT allows smaller, incremental steps to be taken to integrate new tech and practices to benefit businesses.

Let’s dig in.

Organovo 3D bioprinted liver tissue could make it to the FDA by 2019

Organovo demonstrate toxicity testing with ExVive liver product. Image via Organovo

Speculation on 3D printed tissue coming to humans sooner than we think is backed by new pre-clinical findings from 3D bioprinting company Organovo. Though it will still be 3–5 years before the U.S. based Organovo apply for clearance of their liver tissue, that is still sooner than perhaps even the FDA had in mind. Pre-clinical trial data shows that 3D bioprinted liver tissue has been successfully planted into lab-bred mice. The human liver-cell tissue shows regular functionality and, at this stage, is being explored as a suitable patch for the organ.

Read more at 3D Printing Industry.

3D Printing Production Medical Devices — Pitfalls And Best Practices

In May 2016, the FDA released a draft guidance titled Technical Considerations for Additive Manufactured Devices. Any manufacturer or organization considering 3D-printed components during the development of a medical device should refer to this document. The guidance goes into detail regarding risk and other considerations related to 3D printing, as well as how to employ 3D printing within device development.

Read the article here and the FDA guidance here.

Use Existing Data to Optimize IIoT Sensor Deployment

It is hard to know where to start [in IIoT], and whether the solution being designed will be palatable to the end customer in terms of function and price. Rather than ordering highly marketed solutions from outside the enterprise and “tipping” consultants with exorbitant fees, they can find ingredients that are already on hand, apply basic analytics, and come up with some surprisingly tasty ways to translate raw data into process information to improve maintenance or business decisions.

Read about the useful, and easy, ways IIoT can easily be integrated in your business here.

 

We hope to see you next week for another edition brought to you by Authentise!

Week in Review: November 15th to 21st – Industry 4.0 is HERE, Let’s Not Ignore It

Hey everyone, welcome to another Week in Review brought to you by Authentise.

Within the manufacturing industry it’s not always easy to spot the next transformative trend. Within the industry 4.0 we still have lot of ground to cover but the direction is clear: less human employment, higher throughput and much smarter management and upkeep. Nonetheless there are many who sweep the news under the rug and foresee more jobs coming in the near future or dismiss entirely the possibility of such a scenario to be of import to them.

We make the case that industry 4.0 is not only coming, it’s already here. What we once achieved with 25 employees we now do faster with 5. The sheer volume of data that we gather from our manufacturing operations is making it impossible to address it any other way. Let’s embrace the new technologies that will make our business perform better and faster and prepare the next generations to think of manufacturing in terms of interconnectedness and data.

Here are some news to pique your interest.

Manufacturing Jobs Aren’t Coming Back

Screen Shot 2016-11-22 at 10.12.11 AM

Pundits will debate the wellsprings of Donald Trump’s election triumph for years. The decades-long decline of U.S. manufacturing employment and the highly automated nature of the sector’s recent revitalization should also be high on the list of explanations. The former is a source of the working-class rage that helped get Trump elected. The latter is the main reason Trump won’t be able to “make America great again” by bringing back production jobs. Employment in the sector plunged from 18.9 million jobs to 12.2 million [in the last 30y]… More generally, the “job intensity” of America’s manufacturing industries—and especially its best-paying advanced ones—is only going to decline. In 1980 it took 25 jobs to generate $1 million in manufacturing output in the U.S. Today it takes five jobs.

Read the full article at MIT Technology Review.

 

IIoT: From Chaos to Order

Beth Comstock, vice chair at GE, recalled a time not so long ago when corporate executives smirked at the concept of the business value of streaming media. They laughed at the idea of exchanging “analog dollars for digital pennies”. But that’s exactly what happened in television as the industry reshaped itself around the streaming concept and, as a result, digital pennies became digital dollars. This same shift is coming to industry, Comstock said.

Keep reading here.

 

GE Additive to invest $10 million in two educational programmes

GE Additive have today announced a $10 million investment across five years in two educational programmes aimed at developing future talent in additive manufacturing. The additive specialists believe enabling educational institutions to provide access to 3D printers will help accelerate the adoption of additive manufacturing worldwide. “We want to build an ecosystem that drives additive manufacturing across multiple industries,” said Mohammad Ehteshami, Vice President of GE Additive. “GE is committed to this space for the long-term. A new world is coming and we want future generations to have exposure to it from an early age.”

Read more at TCT Magazine.

 

Also, check out the HUGE 3Diax Manufacturing Execution System announcement we made this week!

Subscribe to our mailing list

* indicates required


Also receive our weekly News-in-Review?

Week in Review: November 8th to 14th – Incoming Data Tsunami

Hello, this week we got to witness the power of data on present businesses and good look at what our future has in hold. Information is not only increasing, it’s coming from more devices, in various formats and in very high bandwidths. Every business has to consider how to manage this complex and messy data tsunami. The prize is lucrative: GE foresees that IIoT will increase global GDP by $10-$15 trillion over the next 20 years. At the same time plug & play IoT solutions are making it easier to reap the benefits of networks of sensors and new ways to create and interact with information, digitalizing the world around us, are lowering the bar to enter this world.

There’s a lot to cover in this week’s edition, so let’s get to it.

IIoT could boost GDP by $15 trillion, though data barriers remain

GE research predicts [IIoT] will help generate a $10-$15 trillion boost in global GDP over the next 20 years. Bit Stew Systems commissioned a survey of top IT executives on their readiness for the IIoT revolution. 80% saw the top benefits of IIoT technology as enhanced operating efficiency and uptime. Despite these benefits, 70% are only in the planning phase of integrating IIoT technology. 70% of those surveyed said that proven data modeling and mapping capabilities were the most important aspect of an IIoT platform. However, 64% said that the biggest IIoT challenge stems from difficulties integrating data from a variety of formats and sources, as well as problems extracting business value.

Read the data rich article at ReadWrite.

Plug and play mesh IoT sensor system unveiled

Vicotee AS, part of the Virinco Group of Norway, released at the show a plug-and-play IoT sensor system based on the Smartmesh IP from Linear Technology. The Vicotee system includes Njord sensor modules, the Bifrost gateway, and cloud services for collecting data and managing devices, and operates out of the box collecting temperature, ambient light, humidity, and accelerometer data. The system may well help ease industry’s path to the IIoT.

Read more here.

Microsoft’s 3D Plans and How They May Affect Everyone Else

A 3D scanning concept from Microsoft

In their most recent OS, Windows 10, the company has just provided a series of interesting 3D software tools. The first and most important [effect] is that a great deal more people will be directly exposed to 3D technology. By including this stuff with their software, many more people will bump into it. Secondly, those using the 3D tools will become accustomed to the idea of 3D. The result will be many more 3D-enabled people on the streets of the future. Finally, Those who created systems for providing simple 3D modeling or scanning may suddenly find themselves short customers, because some folks simply found what they needed with Microsoft.

Keep reading at Fabbaloo.

 

This week we will be roaming Formnext‘s booths, see you there!

Remember to sign up to our newsletter to get more juicy news on Authentise services.

Subscribe to our mailing list

* indicates required


Also receive our weekly News-in-Review?

Week in Review: October 25th to 31st – IIoT Prospects

We’ve got Industrial IOT (IIOT) in our crosshair since the launch of Machine Analytics, so maybe that’s the reason we focused on it this week. Or maybe not. Either way, here it is: As digital environments and tools become the norm, businesses that don’t conform to new standards will have staffing issues. A neat infographic shows the concrete way IIoT is helping oil and gas companies boost productivity up to 20% and we also get a deeper look at what cellular networks have to offer to interconnected sensors across sites.

Got your attention? Here we go.

Industry Could Struggle to Attract, Retain Staff Without IIOT

The oil and gas industry could find it hard to attract and retain staff if it doesn’t adopt the industrial internet of things (IIOT), Andrew Hird, vice president and general manager of Digital Transformation at Honeywell Process Solutions, told Rigzone. Speaking at the EMEA HUG conference held in The Hague, Hird stated that IIOT will drive new technologies and outlined that if the upstream oil and gas sector does not allow these new technologies to be deployed, it may lead to staffing issues within the industry.

Read more at Rigzone.

How the Energy Industry Can Use the Industrial IoT to Innovate

As they hunt for more sources of energy, companies are turning to the industrial Internet of Things (IIoT) to achieve these efficiencies and expand operations. Research firm Gartner estimates that 56% of businesses in asset-intensive “heavy” industries like oil and gas will have deployed IoT solutions by the end of 2016. By using wireless connectivity and sensors, energy firms can monitor their assets in the field and achieve higher utilization rates.

Read the whole article at Biztech.

Cellular networks in the IIoT

Typical IIoT applications present cellular networks with additional challenges compared to managing voice calls and high-bandwidth Internet traffic.

Cellular networks have emerged as key components of today’s Industrial IoT (IIoT) networks, especially when it comes to long-distance communication with IIoT endpoints that are installed at field sites. Cellular wide-area networks can provide coverage over several miles, and sometimes across countries, as opposed to the limited coverage provided by Wi-Fi networks. However, the typical IIoT application presents cellular networks with additional challenges compared to managing voice calls and high-bandwidth Internet traffic.

Keep reading here.

 

Subscribe to our mailing list

* indicates required


Also receive our weekly News-in-Review?

Week in Review: October 18th to 24th – Standardization

Here we go again, another week in review for our wonderful following (and newcomers!).

This week is all about standardization: AM standards, legal conundrums and a plea for IIoT to get over the myths that have held it back, such as the need for standardization. Airbus has made ULTEM™ 9085 the standard material for components of its A350 XWB aircraft, bolstering a $15 billion material supply contract with Hexcel Corp. In the mean time, 3D printing’s rising potential to disrupt industrial manufacturing is being analyzed with a series of questions that pose product liabilty under a new light.

Let’s have a deeper look.

$15 billion Boost to 3D Printing Companies from Airbus Contract

Airbus have just announced it is standardizing on ULTEM™ 9085 3D printing material for use in the A350 XWB. OPM partners Hexcel Corp were also included in the Airbus announcement with the news of an update to their $15 billion supply contract. Hexcel make a range of advanced materials including composites for aerospace. ULTEM™ 9085 is a high-performance thermoplastic, offering similar possibilities to PEKK.

Read more about it at 3D Printing Industry.

Products Liability in the Digital Age: Legal Issues Generated by Additive Manufacturing

Although products liability laws are slightly different from jurisdiction to jurisdiction, new legal questions are beginning to arise with the advent of additive manufacturing. In the AM context, for the first time courts will need to address the seemingly obvious threshold questions of “What is the Product?” and “Who is the Manufacturer?”. AM also raises interesting questions concerning what specific theories of liability may be available to plaintiffs alleging injury from 3D-printed products.

Read the full article at Inside Counsel.

Busting 3 Industrial Internet of Things myths

Image for Busting 3 Industrial Internet of Things myths

Unlike consumer markets where standardization, formal or by market dominance, is key to success, for IIoT standardization won’t be a concern for decades. For industries wishing to pursue IIoT it is just to accept that for the foreseeable future there won’t be any standards on how to connect up all their things.

Check out this and two other major IIoT myths at Information Age.

 

Remember to follow us on Twitter as we share more news worthy stories on AM, IIoTIndustry 4.0 and more!

Subscribe to our mailing list

* indicates required


Also receive our weekly News-in-Review?