Approaching the Modernization of Manufacturing (Authentise Weekly News-In-Review – Week 48)

Upgrading to better standards and technologies is becoming easier than ever thanks to their decentralized and scalable nature, giving the opportunity to improve by gradual implementation and testing. There are many avenues of experimentation to consider. IIoT applications can be implemented as small, self-contained units, providing their own power and relaying sensible information where the most valuable data is to be found with a very small investment. Incorporating AM capabilities allows businesses to underpin numerous steps of traditional part production and logistics, assessing ROI that is clear from the start. However, the right software can sometimes be enough to jumpstart operational efficiency immensely, by automating and analyzing machine data with little effort and investment. Authentise very recently started integration of SLM machines data into its 3Diax platform. The digital age of manufacturing enables future-oriented actions to be taken at any business leisure.

Powering The IIoT With Industrial Grade Solar/Li-Ion Hybrids

[Small photovoltaic (PV panels) in combination with Lithium-ion (Li-ion) batteries], two well-proven and synergistic technologies are providing highly cost-effective solutions for both consumer and industrial grade applications, including many connected to the IoT and the IIoT. All sorts of industrial applications are currently deploying PV/Li-ion battery hybrid technology, including GPS sensors and asset trackers, environmental monitoring systems, smart agriculture (monitoring moisture, temperature, and rainfall), marine buoys, and many other M2M and systems control and data automation (SCADA) applications.

Read the full article at Sensors Online.

Sembcorp Marine To Apply AM In Shipbuilding Revolution

A LAAM made part on display at the Sembcorp Marine MOU signing. Photo via A*STAR

Sembcorp Marine is seeking to revolutionize the offshore & marine (O&M) sector by adding cutting-edge technologies to its shipbuilding and repair efforts. In collaboration with three partners across industry and the Singapore government, the company will develop water-tight production applications with a Digital TwinAM and drone assistance.

Read the full article here.

SLM Solutions: Cooperation agreement signed with Authentise Inc.

SLM Solutions Group AG , a leading supplier of metal-based additive manufacturing technology, has recently signed a cooperation agreement with Authentise Inc. Software developed by Authentise helps SLM Solutions customers expand additive manufacturing capacities through greater efficiency, transparency and quality in deploying SLM machines.

Read the full press release here.

 

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SLM Solutions: Cooperation agreement signed with Authentise Inc.

  • Cooperation aims to integrate real-time production data from SLM Solutions machines into Authentise’s 3Diax software platform
  • Integration enables SLM Solutions customers to evaluate real-time production data to automate process flows
  • Capability to analyze real-time production data especially important in series manufacturing

 

Lübeck, 09 November 2017 – SLM Solutions Group AG (“SLM Solutions”), a leading supplier of metal-based additive manufacturing technology, has recently signed a cooperation agreement with Authentise Inc. (“Authentise”). Authentise is a leading US-based provider of software to automate additive manufacturing processes. Software developed by Authentise helps SLM Solutions customers expand additive manufacturing capacities through greater efficiency, transparency and quality in deploying SLM machines.

Henner Schöne4582_schoeneborn.0041born, member of the Management Board of SLM Solutions Group AG: “We’re very pleased with this partnership with Authentise, as it represents an expansion of our existing Industry 4.0 initiatives and solutions. This collaboration enables our customers to access real-time production data from SLM machines – a capability that’s enormously important especially for customers that deploy our machines for series manufacturing of components. With this partnership, we’re taking an important step towards the fully automated processing of orders on our machines. Authentise supplements our Additive Hub design software that we developed in-house.”

 

07c513d9-834b-4970-a537-59593dc316d7Andre Wegner, Authentise CEO, adds: “This partnership with SLM is an important step to completing the digital thread in additive manufacturing. The direct data access to SLM machines that has now been enabled can be combined with other functionalities of our 3Diax software modules to automate manual tasks. It is possible, for example, to automatically update an order status, or generate documentation that enables finished components to be traced back to source. Our 3Diax platform utilizes data in the sense of a self-learning system. The partnership also makes it easier to integrate SLM machines into SLM Solutions’ customers’ IT systems, and facilitates the transparent analysis of production data through the 3Diax Machine Analytics module. The partnership with SLM Solutions  – a leading supplier of metal-based additive manufacturing technology – is so important because  together can we expand the use of additive manufacturing machines in series production.”

About the companies:

SLM Solutions Group AG

Lübeck-based SLM Solutions Group AG is a leading provider of metal-based additive manufacturing technology. The company’s shares are traded in the Prime Standard of the Frankfurt Stock Exchange. The stock has been listed in the TecDAX index since March 21, 2016. SLM Solutions focuses on the development, assembly and sale of machines and integrated system solutions in the field of selective laser melting. SLM Solutions currently employs over 360 members of staff in Germany, the USA, Singapore, Russia, India and China. The products are utilised worldwide by customers in particular from the aerospace, energy, healthcare and automotive industries.  

Authentise Inc.

Authentise Inc. offers software solutions facilitating the deployment of additive manufacturing in production environments. The solutions it offers include the 3Diax Modular Platform as well as the Authentise Manufacturing Execution System (MES). The MES utilizes data from additive manufacturing machines to resolve automation challenges, creating a path to fully automated order processing and tracking. 3Diax modules also provide the flexibility to easily adapt such automation to existing work processes and integrate it into already existent IT systems. The software products enable total production costs to be reduced and customers’ product launch times to be accelerated. Authentise Inc. was founded in 2012 in Silicon Valley and is also represented in Europe.

 

Contact:

Georg Grießmann, cometis AG

Unter den Eichen 7, 65195 Wiesbaden

Telephone: +49 (0) 611-205855-61

E-Mail: griessmann@cometis.de

How the law can foster or hinder unprecedented industrial trends (Authentise Weekly News-In-Review – Week 42)

Uber’s current challenges in London and elsewhere show how governments and legislation can change the path of technology.

Industry 4.0 is no different. The technological trends that characterize the current industrial world have yet to be fully understood, both in terms of sheer research and in its spot within the law. Many issues are arising due to the intricately different nature of these technologies which pose new conundrums with regards to intellectual property (IP), operational and product safety standards and much more.

Nowhere this is more apparent than within the Industrial Internet of Things (IIoT) ecosystems, where its interconnected and decentralized nature makes it more susceptible to cyber-attacks and the new and overwhelming barrage of connected devices make the law-grounds much more difficult to thread. Is it all going too fast for legislators to keep up? It certainly seems so, as Southern China authorities have already issued the mandatory registration for all additive manufacturing industries citing “social security issues”. The trembling hand of these institutions, scrambling to grasp what they cannot entirely control, is starkly in contrast with many other countries where a race is on for the biggest slice of the innovation cake. They are putting together consortiums for the analysis and debugging of law-related issues and fostering the rise and gathering of activities which will, inevitably, spur consolidated operational standards, providing fertile grounds for them to grow.

How product safety will define the success of Industry 4.0/IIoT

Whilst safety protocols for IIoT equipment already exist within the Industrial Ethernet, from a product safety standardization perceptive, the challenges come when product advances outpace safety standards development. Then there’s the potential risk of fitting sensors to existing ‘redundant’ equipment to make these machines IIoT capable. In this scenario, the certified-design and safety parameters of the machine may be invalidated by making the device IIoT ready. Functional Safety for both hardware and software (to standard IEC 61508 and its associated standards) and Cybersecurity are also now defining factors when it comes to building in safety of an IIoT device. These aspects (and more) need to be carefully considered as early on in the design phase as possible.

Keep reading at Control Engineering Europe.

Chinese City Registers All Additive Manufacturing Industries To Ensure “Social Security”

Chongqing is an industrial and technological hub. Image via BASF.

Authorities in Chongqing, Southern China have announced that they will require all 3D printing companies based in the city to register with local police. Xinhua, China’s state news agency, reported that the objective of the measure is to both keep dangerous and illegal products from the public, whilst also controlling the production and sales of digital blueprints and data files for important specialist components.

Read the full article here.

The Industrial Internet Of Things (IIoT) And The Law

There has been surprisingly little attention given by the legal community to the issues and implications associated with the IIoT, either generally or within the utility industry. Discussion of the IIoT in the electric industry has been the province of operational and engineering experts. But IIoT operational and engineering challenges will inevitably present novel and difficult legal issues.

Read the full article at Mondaq.

If you wish to be kept updated on a daily basis on movements in the AM/IIoT world, as well as our service updates and events check out Twitter feed!

We’ll be at Formnext 2017 between the 14th-17th of November! Come check us out at booth Booth # 3.1-A33.

Automation, analyzing our hands-free future (Authentise Weekly News-In-Review – Week 26)

This week we are going to take a look at what automation is doing to our current socio-economical global landscape. It has pervaded the news with its most face-value effect of taking over manual human jobs, which it undoubtedly is: what the public is missing is a clear overview of the far-reaching effects. For example, automation will be able to provide a cushion for the ageing demographic of those countries who are dragging the economic growth. Presently, automation technologies and IIoT are bringing more to the table than raw workforce, exposing unconventional growth vectors to businesses. Automation is also hinting at a possible future in which jobs could be erased, urging a new definition of the individual’s social and economic contribution.

Robots May Help Defuse Demographic Time Bomb in Germany, Japan

robots welding at VW factory

Japan and Germany may be sitting on a ticking demographic time bomb where aging populations begin to drag down economic growth. Good thing they’re also prime candidates for robot revolutions. Increased automation and more use of robotic technology in these manufacturing powerhouses could help cushion the impact, according to Moody’s Investors Service.

Moody’s analysts wrote in the report this month:

“To the extent that robots can undertake activity that require labor, they will compensate for the negative impact that a slower growth in labor force would have otherwise had on growth.”

Read more about it on Industry Week.

Driving Unconventional Growth through the Industrial Internet of Things

Screen Shot 2017-06-17 at 10.17.26 PM

The IIoT has been heralded primarily as a way to improve operational efficiency. But in today’s environment, companies can also benefit greatly by seeing it as a tool for finding growth in unexpected opportunities.
In the future, successful companies will use the Industrial Internet of Things to capture new growth through three approaches: boost revenues by increasing production and creating new hybrid business models, exploit intelligent technologies to fuel innovation, and transform their workforce.

Read the report by Accenture.

Technology Will Erase Jobs—But Also Make Everything Cheap or Free

At Singularity University’s Exponential Finance Summit in New York this week, [Peter] Diamandis talked about the broad and specific trends he believes are leading to a demonetized world. […] The counterbalance to technological unemployment, Diamandis said, is the demonetization of living—in other words, pretty much everything we need and do in our day-to-day lives is becoming radically cheaper, if not free, and technology’s making it happen.

Read the whole article at SingularityHub.

 

Hope to see you again next week for another installment of the News-In-Review, don’t forget to follow us on Twitter and other social media for a more frequent flux of AM & IIoT news!

IIoT, stepping stones to a smarter manufacturing framework (Authentise Weekly News-In-Review – Week 23)

Every business, in manufacturing and otherwise, is coming face to face to the reality of present day interconnected capabilities. The Industrial Internet of Things is often described as the next logical step of the industrial world: after hardware automation comes smart, data-driven, connected way of doing things. The possibilities are astounding and, for many businesses, daunting to achieve, fearful as they are of investing time and money in systems and practices they don’t really understand. Fortunately, first steps are relatively easy to make: Sensors are becoming extremely cheap, making the hardware investment very feasible. “Digital twins” are an example of intuitive, data-driven interfaces for predictive enterprise management. We’re also lowering barriers by becoming more sophisticated: Edge computing lightens the network’s costs compared to trying to eat the cake whole.

PS: Check out what Authentise is doing with IIOT – connecting printers to drive automation and insight for additive manufacturing . 

Research proposes 3D printed sensors to work as warnings in extreme environmental conditions

Researchers at King Abdullah University of Science and Technology, have used 3D Printed sensors to test for levels indicative of forest fires and industrial leaks. This photo is of a controlled fire by Sustainable Resource Alberta, started to promote diversity and create a wall to future fires. Photo by Cameron Strandberg, 38449766@N03 on Flickr

A research team from King Abdullah University of Science and Technology (KAUST) in Saudi Arabia, has published a paper proposing 3D printed disposable and wireless sensors for monitoring large areas. The proof-of-concept study shows the potential of 3D printing as a low-cost method of making fully integrated wireless sensors, which can be utilized in extreme environmental conditions such as forest fires and industrial leaks.

Read the rest of the article here.

Seeing double–digital twins & the future of IIoT

DigitalTwin

Digital twin technology has been trending in the news for quite a while, yet it should be no surprise that it’s in the Industrial Internet of Things where the concept of a virtual representation of a physical product or system will be the most valuable. The digital twin paradigm enables manufacturers to do two things–operate factories efficiently and gain timely insights into the performance of the products manufactured in these factories.

Read more about “Digital Twins” on Smart Industry.

Three reasons why edge architectures are critical for IIoT

[IIoT] data is only valuable if it can be accessed and acted upon quickly, efficiently and safely. Effectively accessing data can be especially challenging when you have “things” — such as sensors, devices, flow computers and more — that live on remote areas of the network. […] The data from these remote sites has the potential to generate valuable business, but is often too far away, too expensive or too insecure to transmit for time-critical operations. Edge computing devices can solve the challenge of making this data available in real time.

Read more at IoT Agenda.

 

Keep following us on Twitter, where we share interesting news and updates to our services, and be sure to come back next week for another edition of the News-In-Review!

Automation and the role of the human (Authentise Weekly News-In-Review – Week 22)

Automation is an unstoppable force for change within pretty much every advanced human industry. It has already been reported that it’s having an impact on low-skilled jobs. Nonetheless, there are many other implications to automation are tremendous. The ability to gather data from distant, and often dangerous, environments without human intervention is no small feat, as is the uplifted capability to simulate and analyze factories’ digital twins in order to obtain predictive insights. A changing scenario brings about new opportunities for improvement: IIoT solutions need to be kept updated to new cyber security standards and much work can still be done to improve the benefits of such solutions. There’s clearly still a lot of work for humans to do. Researchers are needed now more than ever to create the building blocks of the automation future, one that is already here but has still a long way to go.

PS: Have you seen the chapter on Cyberphysical security for Industry 4.0  that our CTO and CEO co- wrote?

New Study Finds That Six Jobs Are Lost for Every Robot Added to the Workforce

Screen Shot 2017-05-20 at 3.34.38 PM

Now, a new paper released by the National Bureau of Economic Research (NBER) puts an actual number to the threat of automation: each industrial robot introduced in the workforce between 1990 and 2007 coincided with the elimination of 6.2 jobs within the commuting area. Wages also saw a slight drop of between .25-.50% per 1,000 employees when one or more robots was added to their workforce.

Read the full article at Futurism.

Seeing double — digital twins & the future of IIoT

DigitalTwin

Digital twin technology has been trending in the news for quite a while, yet it should be no surprise that it’s in IIoT where the concept of a virtual representation of a physical product or system will be the most valuable. The digital twin has a natural home in the IIoT. The components of a CAD model–the design parameters, the operating state, the environment–can all be elements of the digital twin representation. Think of the twin as a body where nerve endings live in the sensors deployed on the machines. The digital twin paradigm enables manufacturers to do two things: operate factories efficiently and gain timely insights into the performance of the products manufactured in these factories.

Read the full article at Smart Industry.

Researchers and defenders needed in IIoT

industrial refinery energy plant oil gas

The Internet of Things and IIoT are causing a lot of security headaches, mostly because these devices and the solutions used to secure them are still in the nascent stages of being developed and coming to market. Phil Neray, CyberX’s vice president of industrial cyber security, said even though the federal government has classified all of these as critical infrastructure, “The fact is that all of these devices were designed a long time ago.” With their age comes the issue that the protocols used to communicate were designed before anyone really understood the vulnerabilities in them. Neray said, “They lack many of the features we take for granted in cyber, and that leaves room for lots of zero days.”

Read more here.

 

That’s it for this week’s edition, don’t forget to check back next week for another News-In-Review. Also, our Twitter feed is filled with news on AM and IIoT so don’t forget to subscribe there as well!

Our Autonomous, Decentralized Future (Authentise Weekly News-In-Review – Week 19)

Ever since the first applications in the Ford automotive pipeline, industrial automation has taken giant steps in assuring a both voluminous and efficient production process. Nonetheless, the centralized framework on which it has thrived does no longer provide an optimal economy for today’s hyper-connected society and infrastructure. Highly automated systems are being put in place to intelligently tackle manufacturing issues, capable of addressing objectives in a decentralized manner. IIoT is a prime example of this, where edge computing combines data collection, analysis and action outside the realm of influence of a central authority. An open source framework, coupled with a mix of microservices is a sound answer to what the future of industrial automation might be. Similarly, AM’s flexible nature is making it possible to rethink manufacturing operations. Small, low-cost machines can work autonomously and in parallel in order to manage various production orders intelligently. Even more farsightedly, Siemens envisions swarms of 3D printing robots capable of subdividing bigger prints into smaller units, working in-situ.

The Move to a Common Open IoT Framework

Loosely-Coupled Microservice Platform Architecture. Source: EdgeX Foundry

In order for the [IIoT] to truly take off, connecting devices to the cloud—or on the edge of the network— needs to be fast, easy and affordable. It is also important that the suppliers of automation technology embrace open standards so that these “things” are interoperable. […] This week, Opto 22 takes its commitment to open standards a step further with the announcement that it has joined The Linux Foundation as a silver level member. According to Opto 22, this strategic move is the company doing its part to “spearhead the adoption of open-source technology in the industrial automation and process control industries, and accelerate the rollout of Industrial Internet of Things application.”

Read more at Automation World.

Markforged plans large-scale digital metal manufacturing with 3D print farms

Sintering multiple 17-4 Stainless Steel Sprockets. Image via Markforged.

The future of metal 3D printing is in print farms says Markforged CEO, Greg Mark. While a number of companies are attempting to create machinery capable of industrial metal 3D printing, Greg Mark believes these “large-format metal printers will be replaced by smaller, low-cost machines working in parallel – print-farms.”

3D metal print-farms will shorten development time, closing the gap between prototyping and production.

Markforged intends to develop a system that allows for rapid production of strong metal parts. For Markforged, farming is the solution for large scale metal 3D printing production. Currently, 3D printing farms are mainly working with plastics.

Read more of their AM farm plans here.

Siemens Contemplating “Swarm” 3D Printing?

Siemens’ experimental production robot.

A report on Forbes details work undertaken by Siemens to develop a “mobile robotic 3D printer” concept. The curious-looking small robot was developed last year and since then has served as an experimental platform for developing software for future production use.

[…] some day, the same software that is helping the robotic spiders crawl the floor while avoiding obstacles and keeping their printing parts in balance could enable whole new systems of factory work – on tasks much more complex than assembling handheld toys.

For example, a team of robots could work together on a new kind of fuselage cylinder for airplanes. If each robot could attack the job from a different angle, they might build complex shapes together that no single printer could create by itself.

Read more about Siemens undertaking here.

 

Don’t forget to come back in a week time to read another edition of the News-In-Review right here at Authentise. Also, come by our Twitter profile to get more, unreported news.

Go Big or Go Home (Authentise Weekly News-In-Review – Week 16)

AM has matured into a fully fledged industrial manufacturing technology. As its materials, processes and applications broaden the jump to full-scale implementation is getting more and more a feasible possibility. The potential to disrupt various industries is being recognized by nations all over the globe: South Korea is one such nation at the forefront of innovation and it has decided to invest 41.2 billion won (Approx. $37 million USD) to foster the development of AM as a key innovation technology. Adidas, on the other hand, seems ready to tackle the stagnating idea that 3D printing is “all hype”. It announced that its concept shoe Futurecraft 4D is ready to be mass-produced as early as 2018, proof that the technology is more than capable to sustain its reputation as a manufacturing game-changer. This is surely shaping up to be the year of the “Go Big or Go Home” mantra, for AM and other important trends. For example in IIoT, where  Ubicquia wants to apply its concept on a city-scale.

South Korea to develop nation’s 3D printing industry with investment of over 41 billion won

Central district district of South Korea's capital city Seoul, viewed from Mt. Namsan. Photo by zuk0 on Flickr

The Ministry of Science, ICT and Future Planning in South Korea has announced it will be spending 41.2 billion won (Approx. $37 million USD) of 2017’s annual budget to encourage the development of 3D printing across the nation. Kang Seong-joo, an official from the ministry, says: “The 3D printing industry is the core technology that will bring about innovation in the manufacturing realm and create a new market by changing the paradigm of the industry. It is important for ministries to cooperate to actively deal with the fast-changing global trend.”

Read more here.

Adidas Futurecraft 4D starts a new era of 3D-printed shoes

Capture

Adidas is back with another sneaker based on a 3D-printed midsole, but this time the company says it’s moving even closer to mass production. The Futurecraft 4D shoe will be the first one using Carbon‘s “Digital Light Synthesis” process. The Silicon Valley company’s tech creates 3D items by blasting liquid with light, which Adidas says will allow it to operate on “a completely different manufacturing scale.” […] its plan to scale up projects more than 100,000 pairs made with the Digital Light Synthesis method by the end of 2018.

Read the full article at Engadget.

Revolutionizing the IIoT Industry One Streetlight at a Time

Sao Paulo industrial IoT Kairo Ubicquia

When Zimmerman [co-founder and chief technology officer of Ubicquia, an Industrial Internet of Things (IIoT) provider] recognized that a light pole could potentially solve all three of those challenges [power, networking and cost], the idea for Kairo began to take form. Over several months, Ubicquia designed and built a wide range of microcontroller boards featuring a variety of sensors and actuators that could be housed in a form factor no larger than a soda can. Kairo empowered sensor and application data to be harnessed by myriad of smart-city applications, delivering improved operations and planning, as well as better decision-making by city government.

Read all about Kairo at Spectrum.

 

Check out our Twitter feed to get more interesting news that weren’t featured here in our selection!

Security & Systematic issues in wake of IIoT (Authentise Weekly News-In-Review – Week 12)

Hello to our dear readers, welcome to the latest edition of News-In-Review!

IIoT is a term dense of meanings and implications. A lot of businesses see in its wake the possibility of unprecedented ROIs and some are already putting down the foundations to implement it in their proceedings. However, before obtaining the many benefits of data analytics, the proper system has to be put in place. One that needs to improve upon a pre-existing industrial network, fixing it’s outdated vulnerabilities, without the need for a complete overhaul. One that is able to withstand a growing risk of DDOS attacks from a growing number of sources thanks to the sensors riddled world we are constructing. And lastly, but not least, one that can assure quality processes and control of every step of the process chain.

If this is a topic you’re interested in, and want to dig in further, our CEO and CTO have written a chapter for Springer’s new “Cyberphysical Security for Industry 4.0” – due May 10.

Here’s this week news:

Forgotten factors that could take down IIoT

When it comes to IoT adoption in the industrial space, I’ve often found that operators worry about how they’re going to run before they can even walk. What this means is industrial operators let certain barriers to entry — primarily security and availability — keep them from even starting on their path to IIoT. In reality, there are certain key steps that industrial companies need to take well before they even attempt that transition.

Read more about these steps here.

Security Professionals Expect More Attacks On IIoT in 2017

Screen Shot 2017-03-18 at 12.28.16 AM

As technology vendors race to create more and more devices connected to the Internet of Things (IoT) the opportunity for hackers to get into these devices grows larger and larger, as these IoT devices are usually made with little to no regard for security. The fears of a large-scale attack waiting to happen were solidified this week when security firm Tripwire released the results of a study it performed about the rise of industrial IoT deployment in organizations, and to what extent it is expected to cause security problems in 2017.

Read the article and study at Onthewire.

Control is the key factor for implementing additive manufacturing in industry

According to the UK’s Manufacturing Technology Centre (MTC), control is the key factor for the implementation of additive manufacturing in an industrial setting. Speaking at today’s Additive World conference […] the MTC’s David Wimpenny explains the most important obstacles additive manufacturing needs to address. They created the National Centre for Additive Manufacturing two years ago, as a visualization of how they expect an additive manufacturing ‘factory of the future’ would look. However, Wimpenny is keen to stress it is not about the number of parts produced in the factory, but about control of the processes. Control of the quality and control of the data is the most important consideration for Wimpenny. As he says, “In a process chain, whatever you don’t control will be a problem”.

Read more here.

 

Don’t forget to follow us on Twitter and to come back in a week time to get a new glimpse at the future of AM, IIoT and all things in between!

Industry of Things World USA

Industry of Things World USA is an international knowledge exchange platform bringing together more than 500 high-level executives who play an active role in the Industrial Internet of Things scene.