Matches made in heaven: the crossroads of innovation (Authentise Weekly News-In-Review – Week 62)

Technologies have often found it beneficial to tap into innovations, sometimes from quite different fields, to find new potential directions to explore. Considering 3D printing’s flexibility, it’s only logical to see it being employed to uplift the possibilities of this or that application. For example, AM enables a new generation of implants to include sensors embedded in them, for a better fit and smarter monitoring respectively. Similarly, in a little validation for us: IIoT is making helping Enterprise Resource Planning (ERP) systems make most of its functions, feeding live, relevant and actionable data to businesses. The matrix of explorations is endless, and combining experimental technologies is showing us new ways to manufacture, design and ultimately, thing about innovation.

Renishaw Case Study: Benefits of Smart Implants with Sensor and 3D Printing Technologies

Renishaw and Western University previously set up the Additive Design in Surgical Solutions (ADEISS) Centre on the university’s campus, which brings together academics and clinicians to work on developing novel 3D printed medical devices. The institute is currently developing technology in the sensor implant field, and recently introduced its smart hip concept, which uses accelerometers and temperature sensors to collect patient data, which is later communicated to a remote device.

Read the full article here.

IIoT And ERP: Powerful Combination Fueled By Data

The IIoT bridges the shop floor and ERP software to allow for the creation and sharing of data in real time. With machine connections, such as programmable logic controllers (PLCs) and sensors, production data is linked to lot, serial and batch details for a seamless flow of information through the cloud. Utilizing data from sensors and other Big Data sources helps businesses analyze data quickly and make better informed decisions. Businesses can better monitor inventory replenishment, sales demands, parts replacement — they can improve virtually any business process to reduce operational and maintenance costs. This is exactly the approach Authentise is following with our data-driven MES.

Read more at Manufacturing Business Technology.

Combining augmented reality, 3D printing and a robotic arm to prototype in real time

Robotic Modeling Assistant (RoMA) is a joint project out of MIT and Cornell that brings together a variety of different emerging technologies in an attempt to build a better prototyping machine. Using an augmented reality headset and two controllers, the designer builds a 3D model using a CAD (computer-aided design) program. A robotic arm then goes to work constructing a skeletal model using a simple plastic depositing 3D printer mounted on its hand.

Read the full article at TechCrunch.

Follow us on Twitter to keep updated on AM & IIoT related news as well as updates to Authentise’s services!

Impact & Advance of Machine Vision (Authentise Weekly News-In-Review – Week 20)

The industrial world has gained, in the past years, thousands of new eyes and ears thanks to sensors and cameras capable of delivering useful data. The added information capacity allows automation to take hold on tasks with higher degrees of complexity. At the same time it is enabling procedures and operations which not only provide innovative ways to achieve certain objectives but also to save time and money in the process. Metrology instrumentation is becoming more accessible than ever, making custom prosthetics a more feasible prospective for medical institutions. Similarly, medical scans allow doctors to drastically cut pre-operation planning and surgical time, resulting in hefty savings. Lastly, machine vision and inspection is bringing a new era of food handling from farms, improving the process’ quality and ultimately the customer experience.

Nikon Metrology inspection technology and additive manufacturing advance patient-specific implants

A Lithuanian medical company has leveraged Nikon Metrology inspection equipment to advance the production of jaw implants. Ortho Baltic, is one of only three manufacturers of patient-specific temporomandibular joint endoprostheses in Europe. In 2012, Ortho Baltic made an investment into additive manufacturing technology, and more recently the company acquired computed tomography (CT) inspection equipment for quality control from Nikon Metrology. The temporomandibular joint (TMJ) is one of the most used joints in the human body, allowing humans to talk and chew. When this joint is damaged, whether it be by trauma or illness, and typical treatment methods have been ineffective, replacement surgery is required. Patient-specific implants are usually reserved for more severe cases, but Ortho Baltic wants to make the administering of tailored endoprostheses the norm.

Read more here.

3D printing helps Queen Elizabeth Hospital reduce surgical planning time by 93%

By using a Stratasys Objet Eden350V 3D Printer, Queen Elizabeth Hospital in Birmingham, UK are saving three to four hours in surgical time per surgery, and costs are reduced by up to £20,000 per operation. The hospital had previously outsourced its 3D printing requirements and have now installed an in-house 3D printer to facilitate life-changing maxillofacial surgeries. According to Stratasys 3D printing has, “revolutionized pre-surgical procedures across a number of departments. This includes the maxillofacial (face and jaw); burns and plastics; ear, nose and throat; and neurosurgery units.”

Read more here.

How Robotic Automation Will Benefit Food and Agriculture

Automation technology is now spilling out of industries such as automotive and electronics and into food and agriculture – and it couldn’t be too soon. Jack Uhl, sales manager – CPG (Consumer Products Group) for Yaskawa America, Inc.’s Motoman Robotics Division recently wrote a compelling blog post outlining how “food just got faster.” In the post, Uhl makes an analogy to the wheel that is the food industry and how automation must become the rim tying the spokes together.

Read the full article at Engineering.

 

As always, don’t forget to check out our Twitter profile for more news and come back next week for another edition of the News-In-Review!

Week in Review: Sept 5th to 11th – GE in the game!

Hello and welcome back to another Week in Review!

This has been a HUGE week for GE as it rocked the 3D printing market bidding $1.4 billion for the acquisition of SLM Solutions and Arcam. Its push into the AM market has been a driving force in the industry for years and now it’s looking to become the one actively pulling the strings. Here’s a good review of the deal. On the side we have exciting news coming from R&D around the world: telecommunications will soon get a major boost from 3D printed fiber optic tips and South Korea puts yet another 3D printed implant advancement in its wide ranging surgical arsenal.

Let’s get to it.

 

GE bidding $1.4B for Arcam and SLM, speeds up 3D printing push

The logo of General Electric is shown at their subsidiary company GE Aviation in Santa Ana, California April 13, 2016. REUTERS/Mike Blake - RTX2E4CJ

General Electric launched bids on Tuesday to buy two of the world’s top makers of machines for metal-based 3D printing – Sweden’s Arcam and Germany’s SLM Solutions – for a total $1.4 billion to bolster its position in the fast-growing technology. “Additive manufacturing will drive new levels of productivity for GE, our customers, including a wide array of additive manufacturing customers, and for the industrial world,” GE Chief Executive Jeff Immelt said in a statement.

Read more about the acquisition here.

 

Researchers devise method for 3D printing complex structures on micro optical fibers

A joint team of researchers have developed a new and innovative method for 3D printing minuscule but highly complex structures on tips of optical fibers, which have diameters as small as 125 micrometers. … “The development of this new technology offers many advantages in terms of reproducibility, flexibility in the design of optical structures, as well as cost” – Keiko Munechika, co-authore of the study.

Read the full article at 3ders.

 

Korea develops new 3D printed facial implants

image: nanjixiong

Professor Yoon Won-soo from Korea Polytechnic University  have developed a new biodegradable 3D printed implants’ material which will not only greatly avoid any complications but could also accelerate the regeneration of natural tissue. We’ve been using patients’ own bones to produce the implant for quite a long time, which could cause damage to the patient. This new material, however, could be made into satisfactory implants directly and is easier to implant with only two hours’ printing time compared to the original eight hours.

Read all about it here.

 

Authentise is sponsoring the Additive Manufacturing Conference 2016 this year. Check it out!

 

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