Monitoring 3D prints – more than just a business boost (Authentise Weekly News-In-Review – Week 94)

We at Authentise are champions of the idea that 3D printing data must be exploited anywhere it is to be found. This often times comes from the printers themselves, offering KPIs on successful print rates and more. Yet even more information can come from external monitoring systems, which that can provide you with data from within the process itself. The benefits of running a monitoring system are numerous, from helping you identify, and potentially correct, issues from within the process, to giving an unprecedented look at still little-known physical phenomenons. Metal printing, for example, is still grounds of research, as we try to understand the dynamics of precise powder melting and the behavior of very hot particles. Another example would be to track 3D printed objects, based on the unique printing “signature” of each printer (like vibrational micro-defects), and thus being able to tell which printer produced it.

High-Speed Cameras Used to Monitor 3D Printing Process

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In a thesis entitled “Process Monitoring for Temporal-Spatial Modeling of Laser Powder Bed Fusion,” a student named Animek Shaurya studies the use of high-speed video cameras for in-situ monitoring of the 3D printing process of nickel alloy 625 to detect meltpool, splatter, and over melting regions to improve the quality of the print.

Read more at 3DPrint.com

New NIST method measures 3D polymer processing precisely

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Researchers at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) have demonstrated a novel light-based atomic force microscopy (AFM) technique–sample-coupled-resonance photorheology (SCRPR)–that measures how and where a material’s properties change in real time at the smallest scales during the curing process. […] Surprising the researchers, interest in the NIST technique has extended well beyond the initial 3D printing applications. Companies in the coatings, optics and additive manufacturing fields have reached out, and some are pursuing formal collaborations, NIST researchers say.

Read the rest here.

This is how researchers can now track 3D printed guns, weapons

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According to academics from the University of Buffalo, there is a way to use the ‘fingerprint’ of 3D printers to accurately trace items printed through the machinery, which may include counterfeit goods, guns, and other weaponry.  No in-fill patterns are the same, and this is the key to tracking down a specific printer.

“3D printers are built to be the same. But there are slight variations in their hardware created during the manufacturing process that leads to unique, inevitable and unchangeable patterns in every object they print,” says Wenyao Xu, Ph.D., associate professor of computer science and engineering in UB’s School of Engineering and Applied Sciences and lead author of the study.

Read the full article here.

 

Senvol Developing Machine Learning for US Navy for Additive Manufacturing

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Senvol has publicly announced that it is developing data-driven machine learning AM software for the U.S. Navy’s Office of Naval Research (ONR). Senvol’s software analyzes the relationships between AM process parameters and material performance. ONR’s goal is to use Senvol’s software to assist in developing statistically substantiated material properties in hopes of reducing conventional material characterization and testing that is needed to develop design allowables.

Read more here.

 

We’ll be at Formnext in Frankfurt from the 13th to 16th November. Come see us at booth #B30J.

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Space, the final frontier will need 3D printing to make it happen (Authentise Weekly News-In-Review – Week 83)

The space industry finds itself in the sweet spot of many advanced technologies, hoping to improve mission success by looking at its problems from all sides. 3D printing has already proved to be a powerful tool for these purposes, with its fast iterative cycles and outside-the-box manufacturing paradigm. What Airbus has been doing for its airplanes, Lockheed Martin is pushing beyond with 3D printed parts that can reach sizes just under 4ft, halving production time, costs and reducing weight. Still, it will be extremely expensive to launch humans to Mars or even the Moon in the near future. For that, we’ll have to rely on robots (with much lower maintenance requirements). By sending autonomous robots to another planet, they can be tasked to 3D print sustainable habitats for us in-situ, by sourcing local materials. Empowered by the digital thread, the designs for these habs can be experimented upon and reiterated, and contests are being created periodically to further improve those that, in a not too distant tomorrow, we could call homes.

 

Lockheed Martin 3D printed an impressive titanium dome for satellite fuel tanks

Lockheed Martin has just taken 3D printing to new heights, printing an enormous titanium dome meant for satellite fuel tanks. It’s the largest space part the company has 3D printed to date and measures 46inch  in diameter — just under 4ft.

“Our largest 3D printed parts to date show we’re committed to a future where we produce satellites twice as fast and at half the cost,” said Rick Ambrose, Lockheed Martin Space executive vice president. “And we’re pushing forward for even better results. For example, we shaved off 87% of the schedule to build the domes, reducing the total delivery timeline from two years to three months.”

Read the full article on Digital Trends.

 

Here’s What We Know About The Robots That Might Build Our First Homes on the Moon

Rovers may soon traverse the surface of the Moon yet again. This time, though, they’ll have one noble mission: to build shelter the first human colonizers will inhabit. A team of Japanese scientists is working to make this a reality. They started a company called ispace with the intention of launching a private space mission to the Moon. ispace envisions an entire colony, called “Moon Valley”, constructed not by human astronauts, but by robots instead. And they want to get started on it soon: the team is planning its first mission for late 2019, and a second in 2020.

Read the full article on Futurism.

 

NASA announces winners of competition to design 3D-printed habitat for Mars

NASA announces winners of competition to design 3D-printed habitat for Mars

NASA has selected the five winning designs in the latest stage of its 3D-printed Habitat competition, which include a community of modular pods made from the Martian surface, and a vertical egg-like container. The On-Site Habitat Competition invited groups to design a sustainable shelter for a crew of four astronauts on a mission to Mars, using construction techniques enabled by 3D printing technology.

Read the rest here.

 

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