Perspectives on AI and the Industry of the future (Authentise Weekly News-In-Review – Week 72)

The field of AI is nowadays established as a core industrial drive in any advanced country. Its wide-ranging applications make it a valuable asset in almost any kind of operation, enabling businesses with unparalleled, yet constantly improving performance. Today, in an industrial setting, AI is being used for process monitoring, data analysis and predictive modeling. It is not surprising to hear of new partnerships in a field such as oil and gas prospecting, where these capabilities can help predict maintenance periods and better process noisy sensor data. The same approach can be used for example in agriculture, where troves of data from a constellation of devices can provide new insights into operational efficiency. The potential for revenue and economic growth is enormous and the international competition is fiercer than ever. Countries such as India are putting resources towards entering a market led by the US and China, but you can definitely expect the list getting longer. How Manufacturing will use AI beyond predictive maintenance is completely open. We have some ideas. What will you do?

Total and Google to develop AI solutions for oil and gas exploration

Total has signed an agreement with Google Cloud for the joint development of artificial intelligence (AI) solutions to accelerate oil and gas exploration and production. Total Group senior vice-president and chief technical officer Marie-Noëlle Semeria said:

“Total is convinced that applying AI in the oil and gas industry is a promising avenue to be explored for optimising our performance, particularly in subsurface data interpretation.”

Check the full article here.

How Industrial AI Can Maximize the Potential of Agriculture’s Planting Season

Industrial AI improves the grower life cycle by turning mountains of otherwise unused ag data into meaningful intelligence. It works at machine scale by synthesizing information from different ag data sources – assets, sensors, weather, satellites, and other systems – and surfacing insights, predictions and recommendations growers can act on. Growers can use new intelligence gained from industrial AI seamlessly and autonomously in the context of their daily workflow to make smarter decisions.

Read it all at PrecisionAG.

India wants to fire up its A.I. industry. Catching up to China and the US will be a challenge

A tech start-up at its office in Gurgaon, India.

India has ambitions to fire up its artificial intelligence capabilities — but experts say that it’s unlikely to catch up with the U.S. and China, which are fiercely competing to be the world leader in the field. An Indian government-appointed task force has released a comprehensive plan with recommendations to boost the AI sector in the country for at least the next five years — from developing AI technologies and infrastructure, to data usage and research.

Read the full article here.

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Manufacturing agility: on-demand printing through AM (Authentise Weekly News-In-Review – Week 57)

The manufacturing model that has characterized the last two centuries was one of irrepressible rush to satisfy the demands of the market. Factories constantly spewed products and parts, even when all orders were satisfied, trusting on times when these might be requested again. Needless to say, this model is very wasteful and contains surplus expenses for stocking and unneeded manufacturing, the infamous “bullwhip effect”, that partake in a feeling of gambling on the market’s ups and downs. Both customers and companies are left unsatisfied. Zara, which makes 50% of its inventory close to the point of use, only sells 10% of its inventory at a discount. Its competitors, 30%.

Additive manufacturing provides the means for a more agile manufacturing framework, one that is capable of flexibly addressing new, and sudden, needs without falling back on warehouse stock. The concept can be applied to every industry on the planet: pharma companies can 3D print drugs on the fly and locally to address an urgent outbreak, constructions can be tailored to local requirements without shipping prefabs. To realize the potential of AM in addressing these demands, the pipeline must be enabled by software capable to provide a holistic overview of operations to nimbly set about whatever request it might face. That’s what we’re focused on at Authentise. Talk to us if you want to know more.

New ‘Reactionware’ 3D Printing System Spits Out Pharmaceuticals On-Demand

Philip Kitson and colleagues at the University of Glasgow have developed a new framework for 3D printing drug manufacturing devices on-site on an as-needed basis. All it requires is a $2,000 3D printer and a drug specification (the manufacturing processes required to produce it). Given such a specification, software created by Kitson’s group dictates to the printer exactly what sort of manufacturing hardware it needs to print that is then capable of producing a particular drug.

Read the rest of the article on Motherboard.

World’s First 3D Printed Toilets Coming to India With Singapore’s Hamilton Labs

Hamilton Labs' 3D printed toilet design complete with energy genertaing solar panel roof. Image via Hamilton Labs

In a new agreement with India’s Center for Rural Information and Action (CRIA) Hamilton Labs will be providing a robot operated 3D printer to “build fast, beautiful and comfortable toilets,” for the Madhubani district in Bihar which sprawls Eastern and Northern India.

Read more about it here.

Mass Production – Is 3D Printing Up To The Supply-Chain Challenge?

Custom designs of 3D printable model cups, from One Coffee Cup a Day | 30 days, 30 cups challenge by Bernat Cuni of Cunicode Design Studio

The Bullwhip Effect describes a phenomenon in which manufacturers build a huge inventory of products based on a forecast of customer demand. From the assumed position high on the supply chain, a manufacturer can misinterpret consumer purchasing behavior at retail level – resulting in a mass of unsaleable stock. Mass customization, i.e. making products to exact customer specifications, low-labor demands and product consolidation, gives 3D printing the potential to break free of the Bullwhip Effect, therefore leading to the question:

“If the Bullwhip Effect is a critical problem in any supply chain, would 3D printing be a solution?”

Read the full article here.

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Bolstering, and Innovating, Local Manufacturing (Authentise Weekly News-In-Review – Week 08)

Hello everyone and welcome to another edition of the weekly News-In-Review, brought to you by Authentise!

There are quite a few factors that contribute to AM’s status as king of the hill of advanced manufacturing processes. By the very nature of AM, manufacturing is becoming decentralized, democratized and is opening doors to new industrial workflows, much more efficient and smart than before. This allows countries to diminish retain manufacturing (and the added value) locally, industrializing their economy (as IMTS’ development of India’s first jet engine). Integrating and developing new manufacturing paradigms like AM will create competitive advantages (as Russia is doing in 3D printed construction), jobs and invigorate the local industrial scene, and enable a greener and more material-efficient economic model (as the UK’s Green Alliance points out).

Here are just a few examples. Let’s take a look.

Intech DMLS developing “India’s first jet engine”

Intech DMLS, a metal additive manufacturing company from India, have announced the development of the country’s first jet engine series. […] the MJE20 engine starts small, powering unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) and remote-controlled aircraft. According to the Times of India, this will make them the first Asian country to develop an indigenous jet engine.

Read more here.

3D printing construction company Apis Cor prints 37 m2 house near Moscow, plans global expansion

Apis Cor, an additive manufacturing construction company based in San Francisco and the Russian cities of Moscow and Irkutsk, has used its own construction 3D printer to build a 3D printed house in Stupino, near Moscow. Construction of the 37m2 building took less than a day. “We are people,” Apis Cor says. “Engineers, managers, builders, and inventors sharing one common idea—to change the construction industry so that millions of people will have an opportunity to improve their living conditions.”

Read more about this ambitious project here.

3D Printing and the Green Economy

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3D printing may play a role in creating a more resource-efficient economy in the UK according to a new study conducted by Green Alliance, a British think tank.
The study, “Getting it Right from the Start: Developing a Circular Economy for Novel Materials,” posits that using new materials and designing for recycling could lower manufacturing costs in Great Britain. The study was conducted for Innovate UK, the High-Value Manufacturing Catapult and the Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council. The use of carbon fiber, bioplastics and 3D printing technologies can create parts and products that are even more durable than those that use plastics created from fossil fuels. These technologies could also enable new, more eco-friendly business models and product lifecycles.

 

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