How Data is supercharging everything around us (Authentise Weekly News-In-Review – #127)

We are strong advocates of the power of data and the opportunities extend well beyond the industrial setting. Everything around us is being uplifted through the aggregation and analysis of data to get insights that would otherwise pass unnoticed or be difficult to grasp. And that is the key: making the data understandable and actionable. IIoT networks submerge businesses’ data centers with information and, to make it work to their advantage, new technologies like AR and VR are stepping in to make it all human-readable. Similarly, transposing medical scans into tangible, bleeding replicas for the doctors to practice on is all about bringing the data closer to the end user. In our eagerness to digitize everything we find ourselves often surprised by data we have gathered that, in hindsight, we never knew we needed. Reparations for the tragic fire at Notre Dame in Paris will be aided by 3D scans of the cathedral that were done in 2015.

Augmented reality: the new business tool driving industry 4.0

Augmented reality: the new business tool driving industry 4.0 image

How can organisations deploy augmented reality (AR) at scale, solve meaningful business problems with the technology and embrace industry 4.0, as a result, Four end-user organizations discussed these questions and their own AR journeys during a panel at LiveWorx 19. Howden […] emerged in the peak of the first industrial revolution but is now committed to embrace the fourth industrial revolution, or industry 4.0. It has done this, in one way, by looking to AR.

“AR has provided us with transformation and consistency,” said Maria Wilson PhD, global leader data driven advantage at Howden.

Read the full article at Information Age.

Prepping For Surgery With 3D-Printed Organs May Become Commonplace

Many doctors are using 3D-printed replicas of human organs to practice for complex surgeries like transplants. Technology is still expensive, but Knowable Magazine reports that as 3D printing gets cheaper, rehearsing a surgery on a 3D-printed replica of a specific patient’s organ could become the norm rather than the exception — a bizarre example of how emerging technology could make personalized medicine cheaper and safer for more patients.

Read more at Futurism.

Fortunately, There Are Incredible 3D Scans of Notre Dame

Thanks to the meticulous work of Vassar art historian Andrew Tallon, every exquisite detail and mysterious clue to [Notre Dame’s] construction was recorded in a digital archive in 2015 using laser imaging. These records have revolutionized our understanding of how the spectacular building was built — and could provide a template for how Paris could rebuild.

According to Wired, “architects now hope that Tallon’s scans may provide a map for keeping on track whatever rebuilding will have to take place.”

Keep reading here.

 

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IIoT is the future of workplace safety (Authentise Weekly News-In-Review – #118)

The increasingly connected systems in place at the factory floors are enabling safer workplaces. The most straightforward approach here is to don workers with sensors that can detect hazardous environment parameters like air quality and temperature or even automatically alert someone if they are injured. In most cases, however, it’s about bypassing the need for human workers to do dangerous tasks. Technologies like predictive analytics can do tremendous work in alerting supervisors before parts get broken and become hazards. Similar smart systems need to be put in place when cooperative robotics start working alongside human counterparts. Using machine learning and computer vision, safety can be guaranteed as robots can have comprehensive knowledge of their surroundings and predict human actions, as well as maximizing the robot’s effectiveness.

Using IIoT-Connected Devices for Worker Health & Safety

IBM announced collaborations with Garmin, Guardhat, Mitsufuji and SmartCone to help organizations monitor their workers’ safety with Watson IoT. Source: IBM

Workplace safety is important in any field. For example, in my line of work, I’m always vigilant of dangers from hot coffee, eye strain, or paper cuts. But in industrial environments such as the manufacturing, petrochemical, or mining industries, the potential dangers are more severe. That’s why researchers and engineers are exploring new ways to use industry 4.0 technology to protect the health and safety of industrial workers.

Read the full article here.

How IoT and Computer Vision Can Enhance Industrial Safety

Welder's safety is protected by IoT

Using IoT sensors can feed the algorithm with real-time data and allow it to make decisions on the spot. For example, if sensors detect gas leakage, increased temperatures or unwanted humidity, work can stop at once or at the very least inform the floor manager. These type of decisions are deterministic and don’t provide much insight into the future. Another way of creating a safer environment is to use the power of computers and machine learning. By creating different scenarios, the algorithm can sense the difference between what is safe and what is not.

Read the rest here.

Collaborative Robots Learn to Collaborate

An automated mobile robot (AMR) uses 3d vision and machine learning to navigate in a more natural manner past a person moving a cart in a warehouse aisle.

To be truly collaborative, robots must be capable of more than working safely alongside human beings. Russell Toris, director of robotics at Fetch Robotics, says robots also need to act (and “think”) more like people. This is particularly true of autonomous mobile robots (AMRs) like those manufactured by Fetch. Typically employed for material transport and data collection (such as counting inventory), these wheeled systems use vision sensors and navigation software to dynamically adapt to new environments and situations. Increasingly common in warehouses and distribution centers, this technology is likely to spread to other applications and industries, including our own.

Read the full article here.

 

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Tackling Education in the World of Additive Manufacturing (Authentise Weekly News-In-Review – Week 63)

AM is here to stay but, for many, the technology is a valuable opportunity watched from afar. Why? A big skill-gap is plaguing the manufacturing industry, which has a hard time finding the right people to employ. How is education being updated to bring new engineers up to current standards? What is the role of industrial and public institutions in influencing education? How much knowledge can one attain with a get-dirty, DIY approach?

Countries around the globe are recognizing the impact AM is having on the manufacturing economy and, along with other advanced technologies, are redesigning curriculums to include these trends. Also, industrial conglomerates, who are the most afflicted by the skill gap issues, aren’t standing by: many are rising up to develop training centers and generate activities to turn the tide. Nonetheless, some students are taking matters into their own hands, not only applying themselves to learning but developing business ideas revolving around AM.

Singapore wants elementary schoolers learning 3D printing, robotics, more

Singapore’s Applied Learning Programme (ALP), which aims to deliver hands-on learning programs to primary schoolers, is being expanded. All schools will implement the program, which includes STEM activities like robotics, coding, and 3D printing, by the year 2023.

“Students learn by applying and by doing, and they learn beyond the classroom,” Ng explained. “They see for themselves how they can apply what they have learnt to the real world.” – Singapore’s Education Minister for Schools Ng Chee Meng

Read more about it here.

NCAM calls on industry to help plug additive manufacturing skills gap

MTC NCAM

Given the buzz around AM technologies, you would be forgiven for assuming the message has been received loud and clear but with the UK Government’s recent Industrial Strategy failing to highlight the importance of AM and around 62% of manufacturers planning to undertake some form of move to ‘Industry 4.0‘, the appeal for more education and relevant skills is extremely valid. Within the Manufacturing Technology Centre (MTC) in Coventry, the team at the UK’s National Centre for Additive Manufacture (NCAM) is currently seeking to answer that call by embarking on the task of addressing the AM skills gap.

Read more at TCT Mag.

3D Printing Entrepreneur Reveals Plan for 24h Sneaker Turnaround

A student entrepreneur who developed the idea, technology, and production of his own brand of custom 3D printed sneakers will see his “UnisBrands” products hit the market soon. Nick Unis, who is currently a final year accounting and finance student at Penn State University-Altoona, has been nurturing his idea for custom running shoes since high school. Having now joined the Happy Valley LaunchBox FastTrack Accelerator, Unis plans to ship the first UnisBrands shoes in Summer 2018, with the aim of averting 24 to 72 hours turnaround per pair.

Keep reading the article here.

 

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SLM Solutions: Cooperation agreement signed with Authentise Inc.

  • Cooperation aims to integrate real-time production data from SLM Solutions machines into Authentise’s 3Diax software platform
  • Integration enables SLM Solutions customers to evaluate real-time production data to automate process flows
  • Capability to analyze real-time production data especially important in series manufacturing

 

Lübeck, 09 November 2017 – SLM Solutions Group AG (“SLM Solutions”), a leading supplier of metal-based additive manufacturing technology, has recently signed a cooperation agreement with Authentise Inc. (“Authentise”). Authentise is a leading US-based provider of software to automate additive manufacturing processes. Software developed by Authentise helps SLM Solutions customers expand additive manufacturing capacities through greater efficiency, transparency and quality in deploying SLM machines.

Henner Schöne4582_schoeneborn.0041born, member of the Management Board of SLM Solutions Group AG: “We’re very pleased with this partnership with Authentise, as it represents an expansion of our existing Industry 4.0 initiatives and solutions. This collaboration enables our customers to access real-time production data from SLM machines – a capability that’s enormously important especially for customers that deploy our machines for series manufacturing of components. With this partnership, we’re taking an important step towards the fully automated processing of orders on our machines. Authentise supplements our Additive Hub design software that we developed in-house.”

 

07c513d9-834b-4970-a537-59593dc316d7Andre Wegner, Authentise CEO, adds: “This partnership with SLM is an important step to completing the digital thread in additive manufacturing. The direct data access to SLM machines that has now been enabled can be combined with other functionalities of our 3Diax software modules to automate manual tasks. It is possible, for example, to automatically update an order status, or generate documentation that enables finished components to be traced back to source. Our 3Diax platform utilizes data in the sense of a self-learning system. The partnership also makes it easier to integrate SLM machines into SLM Solutions’ customers’ IT systems, and facilitates the transparent analysis of production data through the 3Diax Machine Analytics module. The partnership with SLM Solutions  – a leading supplier of metal-based additive manufacturing technology – is so important because  together can we expand the use of additive manufacturing machines in series production.”

About the companies:

SLM Solutions Group AG

Lübeck-based SLM Solutions Group AG is a leading provider of metal-based additive manufacturing technology. The company’s shares are traded in the Prime Standard of the Frankfurt Stock Exchange. The stock has been listed in the TecDAX index since March 21, 2016. SLM Solutions focuses on the development, assembly and sale of machines and integrated system solutions in the field of selective laser melting. SLM Solutions currently employs over 360 members of staff in Germany, the USA, Singapore, Russia, India and China. The products are utilised worldwide by customers in particular from the aerospace, energy, healthcare and automotive industries.  

Authentise Inc.

Authentise Inc. offers software solutions facilitating the deployment of additive manufacturing in production environments. The solutions it offers include the 3Diax Modular Platform as well as the Authentise Manufacturing Execution System (MES). The MES utilizes data from additive manufacturing machines to resolve automation challenges, creating a path to fully automated order processing and tracking. 3Diax modules also provide the flexibility to easily adapt such automation to existing work processes and integrate it into already existent IT systems. The software products enable total production costs to be reduced and customers’ product launch times to be accelerated. Authentise Inc. was founded in 2012 in Silicon Valley and is also represented in Europe.

 

Contact:

Georg Grießmann, cometis AG

Unter den Eichen 7, 65195 Wiesbaden

Telephone: +49 (0) 611-205855-61

E-Mail: griessmann@cometis.de

How the law can foster or hinder unprecedented industrial trends (Authentise Weekly News-In-Review – Week 42)

Uber’s current challenges in London and elsewhere show how governments and legislation can change the path of technology.

Industry 4.0 is no different. The technological trends that characterize the current industrial world have yet to be fully understood, both in terms of sheer research and in its spot within the law. Many issues are arising due to the intricately different nature of these technologies which pose new conundrums with regards to intellectual property (IP), operational and product safety standards and much more.

Nowhere this is more apparent than within the Industrial Internet of Things (IIoT) ecosystems, where its interconnected and decentralized nature makes it more susceptible to cyber-attacks and the new and overwhelming barrage of connected devices make the law-grounds much more difficult to thread. Is it all going too fast for legislators to keep up? It certainly seems so, as Southern China authorities have already issued the mandatory registration for all additive manufacturing industries citing “social security issues”. The trembling hand of these institutions, scrambling to grasp what they cannot entirely control, is starkly in contrast with many other countries where a race is on for the biggest slice of the innovation cake. They are putting together consortiums for the analysis and debugging of law-related issues and fostering the rise and gathering of activities which will, inevitably, spur consolidated operational standards, providing fertile grounds for them to grow.

How product safety will define the success of Industry 4.0/IIoT

Whilst safety protocols for IIoT equipment already exist within the Industrial Ethernet, from a product safety standardization perceptive, the challenges come when product advances outpace safety standards development. Then there’s the potential risk of fitting sensors to existing ‘redundant’ equipment to make these machines IIoT capable. In this scenario, the certified-design and safety parameters of the machine may be invalidated by making the device IIoT ready. Functional Safety for both hardware and software (to standard IEC 61508 and its associated standards) and Cybersecurity are also now defining factors when it comes to building in safety of an IIoT device. These aspects (and more) need to be carefully considered as early on in the design phase as possible.

Keep reading at Control Engineering Europe.

Chinese City Registers All Additive Manufacturing Industries To Ensure “Social Security”

Chongqing is an industrial and technological hub. Image via BASF.

Authorities in Chongqing, Southern China have announced that they will require all 3D printing companies based in the city to register with local police. Xinhua, China’s state news agency, reported that the objective of the measure is to both keep dangerous and illegal products from the public, whilst also controlling the production and sales of digital blueprints and data files for important specialist components.

Read the full article here.

The Industrial Internet Of Things (IIoT) And The Law

There has been surprisingly little attention given by the legal community to the issues and implications associated with the IIoT, either generally or within the utility industry. Discussion of the IIoT in the electric industry has been the province of operational and engineering experts. But IIoT operational and engineering challenges will inevitably present novel and difficult legal issues.

Read the full article at Mondaq.

If you wish to be kept updated on a daily basis on movements in the AM/IIoT world, as well as our service updates and events check out Twitter feed!

We’ll be at Formnext 2017 between the 14th-17th of November! Come check us out at booth Booth # 3.1-A33.

IIoT engulfs the world, is the world ready? (Authentise Weekly News-In-Review – Week 04)

Hi everyone and welcome to this new edition of your weekly News-In-Review by Authentise!

We are switching the release date to Sunday from now on so tune in every weekend to get your curated news report.

This week we filled our feeds with news coming from the IIoT world. More & more resources are poured by industrial players to get ahead in the race to ride the sensor-empowered wave of IIoT but there is more to do hiding in the avalanche of data that is coming out of it. While Frankfurt showcases industry 4.0 in its privileged spot as Europe’s main internet hub and key players’ collaborations take the IIoT ecosystem up a notch, the data shows early adopters can’t seem to create actionable insights out of it all. As IIoT engulfs the industrial world in data, smart process development driven by analytics is key to make use of the incredible information capacity in our hands.

Frankfurt factory showcases Industry 4.0

Screen Shot 2017-01-21 at 12.37.28 AM

Frankfurt is the world’s largest internet hub – and with volume doubling every year, companies are turning to the latest technology. That was the starting point for one German company – which has built a factory to show what’s possible.

Click here to see the article and video.

Honeywell and Aeron collaborate

Honeywell has announced that it will collaborate with Aereon on solutions to help industrial customers boost the safety, efficiency and reliability of their operations by leveraging Honeywell’s Industrial Internet of Things (IIoT) ecosystem. The INspire™ ecosystem is a part of Honeywell’s Connected Plant initiative, which helps manufacturers leverage the IIoT to improve the safety, efficiency and reliability of operations across a single plant or several plants within an enterprise. Honeywell and its ecosystem partners are developing infrastructure that offers customers secure methods to capture and aggregate data, and apply advanced analytics. Customers can then use this information to determine methods to reduce or eliminate manufacturing upsets and inefficiencies.

Click here to read more about the collaboration.

Making Sense of IIoT Analytics

Screen Shot 2017-01-21 at 12.48.05 AM

As the Industrial Internet of Things (IIoT) picks up steam, attention is pivoting from connectivity to analytics, flooding manufacturers with a wave of new offerings that all promise to facilitate real business change. […] “It’s really easy to capture data, but to then make that data actionable is where companies are really struggling,” notes Ryan Lester, director of IoT strategy for Xively, an IoT platform provider. “Companies don’t have the right analytics tools to parse through the data and they don’t have access to good algorithms to get insights.” In fact, according to research by Forrester and Xively, 51% of companies are collecting data from connected products, but only 33% are leveraging the intelligence to create actionable insights.

Click here to know more of IIoT analytics.

 

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Week in Review: 4th October to 10th – AM Put in Perspective

Here we go for another Week in Review.

Additive manufacturing is more than a production tool with advanced features and mouth-watering opportunities, it is a puzzle block of an international effort to realize the vision of the industry of the future, or Industry 4.0. As such, this week we saw further movements in international cohesion as AM standards become the focus of huge global collectives and more questions arise in the face of new financing and leasing unknowns.

Let’s dig in.

ISO & ASTM International Create Additive Manufacturing Standards Development Structure

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As questions arise and larger companies begin pumping out 3D printed components, the need has been obviously for cohesion. And both the International Organization for Standardization (ISO) and ASTM International have stepped in to take care of business, creating the Additive Manufacturing Standards Development Structure. This will offer a comprehensive and much-needed framework that those involved in both additive manufacturing and 3D printing can use for technical standards.

Read the full article here.

Financing the Fourth Industrial Revolution

Manufacturers are no longer restricted to traditional financing arrangements where they would pay for equipment over time and use their own personnel to monitor and service that equipment. Now a variety of purchase/service hybrid arrangements are available and, says Amos, financial executives are increasingly looking at a “fourth generation” of financing which looks “like a service contract by a service provider to a service user.”

Read more here.

New 3D printed titanium satellite inserts by Atos and Materialise are up to 70% lighter

The part in question is a highly loaded insert that is used as mounting point for big and heavy structures, including panels in satellites. As the companies revealed, a joint team performed a comprehensive study of currently used parts, and reduced their weight: in total, the weight was reduced from 1454 grams to 500 grams – a highly impressive 66 percent reduction. It currently costs about $20K to send a single Kg into orbit – so 3D printing more efficient components could save millions in the aerospace sector.

Read more about it at 3Ders.

 

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