The problems, and solutions, to the IIoT (Authentise Weekly News-In-Review – #110)

The Industrial Internet of Things (IIoT) is taking hold on many industrial settings, and yet we are still far from reaping its true benefits. There are multiple reasons for this, and they have to do with the technical limitations of dealing with a large number of sensors and data, how to interpret it correctly and efficiently and how to create a reliable mesh network to tie it all together. AI may look promising for data handling and predictive systems. However, there are many angles to iron out before these make feasible solutions. AI’s prowess on self-teaching may fall short when, to be useful, it would have to learn and predict countless possibilities of a complex industrial setting. Established technologies, or novel combinations of them, can bring exciting opportunities to the table. RFID tagging for warehouse traceability is a dream come true for spoiling inventories while merging long-range connectivity with cloud services can satisfy a large portion of IIoT applications.

How IIoT and RFID deal with perishable inventory

Screen Shot 2019-02-25 at 11.17.42 AM

In North America alone, billions of dollars of food spoil before reaching customers each year. In the pharmaceutical industry, temperature-sensitive products are regularly damaged due to inappropriate shipping and storing conditions. To gain better visibility into the location and the condition of perishable inventory items, businesses can turn to RFID and IIoT technologies.

Read the full article at Smart Industry.

Is Artificial Intelligence the Answer for IIoT?

Many AI methods are self-taught, so they avoid the need for process mapping and other tedious analytical processes, making it seem to be the right fit for IIoT. Yet, only a few methods will apply. The most useful methods are not greedy for impossible amounts of data. They focus machine learning in explainable ways. The rest will fail badly.

Read more here.

Using LoRa and Google Cloud for IIoT Applications

Image of a gateway communicating with the cloud on LoRa

Pairing LoRa connectivity with the Google Cloud Platform (GCP) can serve a wide range of industrial IoT (IIoT) use cases. The longevity and resilience of LoRa paired with GCP’s robust architecture and commitment to scalable innovation provides industrial operators with the tools they need to build the world of tomorrow.

Read more here.

 

Follow us on Twitter to keep updated on AM & IIoT related news as well as updates to Authentise’s services!

Key Reasons AM is Headed to Manufacturing: Price, Tools & Pilots (Authentise Weekly News-In-Review – Week 91)

AM has moved from a technology limited to prototyping to a full-fledged game changer in manufacturing. This change didn’t happen overnight and we can trace its recent success on a few key advances that enabled it to become more approachable and employable. First, metal AM machines are coming down in price drastically, making the technology more affordable to businesses at a sub $500K price tag. Hybrid manufacturing equipment is incorporating AM to leverage its potential while compensating its shortcoming with traditional tools to finish the job, making the jump into AM less restrictive. Ultimately, but not less important, companies are finally coming out of their pilot projects with positive results and are keen to delve deeper into their investments and scale their operations.

HP’s Metal Jet 3D printer may build your next car’s innards

DmxNkvRW0AAU5Tj

A number of companies offer metal 3D printing, which creates products and components layer by layer with a computer-controlled system tracing its lineage to ordinary inkjet printers. But on Monday, printing giant HP announced it’s entered the market with the ambition to dramatically lower prices, courtesy of a $400,000 product called the Metal Jet.

“We’re really going to enable mass production for mainstream metals, in particular steels,” said Tim Weber, head of 3D metal printing for HP.

Read more at CNET.

Hybrid Manufacturing & The Future of 3D Printing for Production

[…] much like 3D printing, the potential benefits of hybrid manufacturing have made some early adopters very optimistic about the technology’s future prospects. Michael Sealy, assistant professor of mechanical and materials engineering at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln is one of them.

“Additive really opens up the doors in terms of being able to print your own mechanical properties layer-by-layer or zone-by-zone,” he said. “That’s one of the big advantages, so I see hybrid AM exploding in the next few years just because of all that potential.”

Read more here.

GE Transportation To Introduce 250 3D Printed Locomotive Parts By 2025DoSo6x6XkAAgjqC

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

According to reports in UK rail industry authority the Railway Gazette GE is looking to apply additive manufacturing to components for its locomotives. If all goes according to plan, this could mean that in the next seven years GE Transportation will have an inventory of up to 250 3D printed train components.

A pilot initiative for 3D printing at GE Transport is underway as part of its Brilliant Factory model, combined with analytics and lean manufacturing in a Digital Thread.

 

We’ll be at Formnext in Frankfurt from the 13th to 16th November. Come see us at booth #B30J.

Follow us on Twitter to keep updated on AM & IIoT related news as well as updates to Authentise’s services!

How Small/Medium Businesses Will Drive the AM Wave (Authentise Weekly News-In-Review – Week 90)

Small and medium businesses (SMBs) have advantages that big corporations don’t have. One of them is agility, to make business decisions and to move into new markets. This agility is being augmented by technologies like additive manufacturing, laying the groundwork for them to become the next giants of the manufacturing industry. For starters, the barriers to entry in the industry have drastically lowered as startups no longer need to invest on expensive, specialized machinery. However, data shows that SMBs are already readily investing in AM, which puts them in the optimal position of focusing on new, maybe niche markets and grow unaffected by big, established companies. Furthermore, AM gives them the ability to nimbly change their production planning and strategy based on the whims of the market, better gearing their products and services to what is selling the most.

How 3D Printing Is Empowering SMBs in Manufacturing’s Digital Transformation

Traditional manufacturing requires companies to invest in expensive molds before a single product can be produced. And once the mold is developed, large order commitments are required to achieve enough scale for products to be priced competitively in the market. This poses a challenge for any company; but for startups and small companies it’s often completely cost-prohibitive. 3D printing eliminates such costly barriers to entry by not requiring physical prerequisites like molds for production. In fact, products can be custom-produced directly from digital files, with 3D printing software able to identify potential design flaws or inconsistencies before the manufacturing process even starts. And the ability of service bureaus to print products on-demand eliminates the need for large manufacturing runs or the potential for excess inventory.

Keep reading here.

3D printing to be utilised by three quarters of Europe’s SMB’s by 2020

Following new research by Ricoh Europe, it has been revealed that almost three quarters of Europe’s small and medium sized businesses (SMB) believe that 3D printing technology is vital to reduce costs and improve agility. The research found that 44% of the 2,370 SMB leaders surveyed from 23 different countries have already invested in 3D printing with a further 30% planning to invest within the next two years. From the businesses that were surveyed, it was revealed that 70% of businesses are aiming to utilise 3D printing to introduce new manufacturing strategies and techniques.

Read the full article here.

How “Speed Factories” Help Companies Adapt to Capricious Consumers

Speed factories are a growing trend among consumer-goods businesses, and one Jan Van Mieghem, professor of managerial economics and operations at Kellogg, has been researching. “More companies are focused on localization now, with custom-made products for very small local markets,” Van Mieghem says. Speed factories offer fast turnaround to meet demand in such markets, but they often have higher production costs.

Read the full article here.

 

Follow us on Twitter to keep updated on AM & IIoT related news as well as updates to Authentise’s services!