The Scalability of IIoT Systems (Authentise Weekly News-In-Review – Week 56)

The IIoT is an acronym that’s being touted around industrial settings for years now. As it stands for Industrial Internet of Things, its goal is similar to what common household IoT devices try to achieve: smart control and monitoring of operations, at any scale and complexity. Approaching the subject can look daunting and many companies think the technical effort is out of reach without any practical benefit. That’s because we’re not making benefits clear enough to the operators. Our current deployments are expensive one-off customs and those that go beyond that are often simple dashboards or at best predicitive maintenance tools – both deliver none or very little ROI by themselves.

While we’re trying to build scalable process efficiency systems using IIOT data at Authentise the key steps to make IIoT really scalable are flexible platforms that can process all kinds of data for different outcomes and are very easy for untrained operators to program. The devices required to obtain, elaborate data and to generate insights are now very cheap and the market is sprouting solutions tailored to every occasion. Now the software interfaces needed to manage the system need to becoming friendlier, cheaper or even open source, enabling the full spectrum of applications to talk to each other frictionlessly. All of this makes for a framework that can scale from a single piping temperature sensor to the entire production pipeline. It’s been reported that 86% of industrial orgs are already adopting IIoT solutions, and it doesn’t pertain only to big corporations. Breweries can leverage data from their distilling operation just as much as Lockheed Martin does from its F-35 factory floor. While we only currently unlock 5% of available data, it’s easy to see the promise going forward.

Shipyard 4.0 Concept Features 3D Printing, Digital Twins, Advanced Technologies for Shipbuilding in Spain and Australia

In order to reduce business costs and increase productivity in line with Industry 4.0, Navantia has implemented the Shipyard 4.0 model, which will apply and optimize these technologies for applications in shipbuilding. The model has been implemented in Navantia Spain’s Ferrol shipyard in order to build next-generation F110 frigates for the Spanish Navy […] The Shipyard 4.0 model will enhance the outcomes of Navantia Australia’s SEA 5000 and Continuous Build Program by helping to develop a sustainable shipbuilding industry for the Navy, creating a new skilled workforce and modern facilities for both the shipyard and the supply chain, and setting up a modern ICT infrastructure that will support the digital twin (ship zero) of the shipyard, as well as for the ship.

Read more about Navantia Shipyard 4.0 here.

New study reveals rise of IIoT adoption in manufacturing

According to the 2017 study [by Bsquare], 86% of industrial organizations are currently adopting IoT solutions and 84% believe those solutions are very or extremely effective. In addition, 95% believe that IoT has a significant or tremendous impact on their industry. However, the study also shows that most IIoT investments are focused on connectivity (78%) and data visualization (83%). In addition, only 48% are doing advanced analytics on that data and only a small number (28%) are automating the application of insights derived from analytics.

Read more stats at Modern Materials Handling.

Breweries Tapping the IIoT to Produce Your Favorite Brew

By creating that virtual environment and installing IIoT sensors throughout the production and packaging environments, breweries that have adopted advanced analytics to process the collected data can help predict equipment lag or failure before they disrupt production. At the very least, the sensors can help to provide critical insights to identify the root of the problem to minimize downtime.

Read the full article here.


Follow us on Twitter to keep updated on AM & IIoT related news as well as updates to Authentise’s services!

How AM can Boost Manufacturing Economies (Authentise Weekly News-In-Review – Week 52)

AM is one of the technologies that are contributing to economic growth of countries across the globe. The factors at play are many: research centers bring innovation and business opportunities, businesses offer new products and services based on considerable investments, and so on. A UK review has pinpointed AM as one of the technologies that will grow its manufacturing economy to £455B over the next decade. It’s no surprise that governments are keen to keep the ecosystem thriving under the best conditions possible. This comes into play in a variety of ways: huge funds are being made available to invest in AM-related activities, govt. funded regulations and standards are being drafted (like the FDA guidance on 3D printing of medical products) and defense agencies are incorporating AM within their innovation initiatives. The fertile soil for manufacturing innovation will reward every country with the farsight to make it happen.


Additive manufacturing to play key role in £455bn UK manufacturing potential


A government-commissioned review on industrial digitalisation in the UK, has pinpointed additive manufacturing (AM) as one of the major innovations that could catapult the UK manufacturing economy to £455 billion over the next decade. The ‘Made Smarter’ report, led by Juergen Maier, CEO of Siemens UK, identifies a number of Industrial Digital Technologies (IDTs) including robotics, virtual reality and Internet of Things, as key areas of opportunity for the UK to increase growth in the manufacturing sector. Bringing together expertise from over 200 small businesses, universities and organisations including Additive Manufacturing UK, the 246-page review suggests that the UK stands to benefit from an additional 175,000 jobs and between 1.5 and 3% growth per year by adopting these technologies.

Read the full article at TCT Mag.

Statement by FDA Commissioner Scott Gottlieb, M.D., on FDA ushering in new era of 3D printing of medical products; provides guidance to manufacturers of medical devices

Once considered a futuristic technology on the distant horizon, 3D printing of medical devices, medications and human tissue is quickly becoming a promising reality. Patients have already benefitted from 3D printed medical products through access to personalized devices and innovative drugs that have led to significant health improvements. But the FDA is now preparing for a significant wave of new technologies that are nearly certain to transform medical practice. We’re working to provide a more comprehensive regulatory pathway that keeps pace with those advances, and helps facilitate efficient access to safe and effective innovations that are based on these technologies.

Read the full statement on the FDA website.


Government and 3D Printing: A New Line of Innovation to Protect

After realizing the boost 3D printing could deliver to manufacturing, the U.S. government increased funding for institutions researching AM technologies. In 2012 the federally funded National Additive Manufacturing Innovation Institute (NAMII) was launched — a $30 million pilot institute aimed at boosting 3D printing’s use in manufacturing. Also referred to as America Makes, the institute works with brilliant minds from industry, academia, and government. It is expected that these collaborations will help reduce the period of development between a lab’s proof-of-concept and commercial product. With the U.S. government investing more in AM and 3D printing techniques, governmental organizations are now starting to integrate the technology into their own processes.

Keep reading here.


This being the last News In Review before the festivities, we at Authentise wanted to wish you all a Merry Christmas!

Visit our Twitter feed to get daily news on IIoT/AM and updates to our services!

Approaching the Modernization of Manufacturing (Authentise Weekly News-In-Review – Week 48)

Upgrading to better standards and technologies is becoming easier than ever thanks to their decentralized and scalable nature, giving the opportunity to improve by gradual implementation and testing. There are many avenues of experimentation to consider. IIoT applications can be implemented as small, self-contained units, providing their own power and relaying sensible information where the most valuable data is to be found with a very small investment. Incorporating AM capabilities allows businesses to underpin numerous steps of traditional part production and logistics, assessing ROI that is clear from the start. However, the right software can sometimes be enough to jumpstart operational efficiency immensely, by automating and analyzing machine data with little effort and investment. Authentise very recently started integration of SLM machines data into its 3Diax platform. The digital age of manufacturing enables future-oriented actions to be taken at any business leisure.

Powering The IIoT With Industrial Grade Solar/Li-Ion Hybrids

[Small photovoltaic (PV panels) in combination with Lithium-ion (Li-ion) batteries], two well-proven and synergistic technologies are providing highly cost-effective solutions for both consumer and industrial grade applications, including many connected to the IoT and the IIoT. All sorts of industrial applications are currently deploying PV/Li-ion battery hybrid technology, including GPS sensors and asset trackers, environmental monitoring systems, smart agriculture (monitoring moisture, temperature, and rainfall), marine buoys, and many other M2M and systems control and data automation (SCADA) applications.

Read the full article at Sensors Online.

Sembcorp Marine To Apply AM In Shipbuilding Revolution

A LAAM made part on display at the Sembcorp Marine MOU signing. Photo via A*STAR

Sembcorp Marine is seeking to revolutionize the offshore & marine (O&M) sector by adding cutting-edge technologies to its shipbuilding and repair efforts. In collaboration with three partners across industry and the Singapore government, the company will develop water-tight production applications with a Digital TwinAM and drone assistance.

Read the full article here.

SLM Solutions: Cooperation agreement signed with Authentise Inc.

SLM Solutions Group AG , a leading supplier of metal-based additive manufacturing technology, has recently signed a cooperation agreement with Authentise Inc. Software developed by Authentise helps SLM Solutions customers expand additive manufacturing capacities through greater efficiency, transparency and quality in deploying SLM machines.

Read the full press release here.


If you wish to be kept updated on a daily basis on movements in the AM/IIoT world, as well as our service updates and events check out Twitter feed!

Automation and the role of the human (Authentise Weekly News-In-Review – Week 22)

Automation is an unstoppable force for change within pretty much every advanced human industry. It has already been reported that it’s having an impact on low-skilled jobs. Nonetheless, there are many other implications to automation are tremendous. The ability to gather data from distant, and often dangerous, environments without human intervention is no small feat, as is the uplifted capability to simulate and analyze factories’ digital twins in order to obtain predictive insights. A changing scenario brings about new opportunities for improvement: IIoT solutions need to be kept updated to new cyber security standards and much work can still be done to improve the benefits of such solutions. There’s clearly still a lot of work for humans to do. Researchers are needed now more than ever to create the building blocks of the automation future, one that is already here but has still a long way to go.

PS: Have you seen the chapter on Cyberphysical security for Industry 4.0  that our CTO and CEO co- wrote?

New Study Finds That Six Jobs Are Lost for Every Robot Added to the Workforce

Screen Shot 2017-05-20 at 3.34.38 PM

Now, a new paper released by the National Bureau of Economic Research (NBER) puts an actual number to the threat of automation: each industrial robot introduced in the workforce between 1990 and 2007 coincided with the elimination of 6.2 jobs within the commuting area. Wages also saw a slight drop of between .25-.50% per 1,000 employees when one or more robots was added to their workforce.

Read the full article at Futurism.

Seeing double — digital twins & the future of IIoT


Digital twin technology has been trending in the news for quite a while, yet it should be no surprise that it’s in IIoT where the concept of a virtual representation of a physical product or system will be the most valuable. The digital twin has a natural home in the IIoT. The components of a CAD model–the design parameters, the operating state, the environment–can all be elements of the digital twin representation. Think of the twin as a body where nerve endings live in the sensors deployed on the machines. The digital twin paradigm enables manufacturers to do two things: operate factories efficiently and gain timely insights into the performance of the products manufactured in these factories.

Read the full article at Smart Industry.

Researchers and defenders needed in IIoT

industrial refinery energy plant oil gas

The Internet of Things and IIoT are causing a lot of security headaches, mostly because these devices and the solutions used to secure them are still in the nascent stages of being developed and coming to market. Phil Neray, CyberX’s vice president of industrial cyber security, said even though the federal government has classified all of these as critical infrastructure, “The fact is that all of these devices were designed a long time ago.” With their age comes the issue that the protocols used to communicate were designed before anyone really understood the vulnerabilities in them. Neray said, “They lack many of the features we take for granted in cyber, and that leaves room for lots of zero days.”

Read more here.


That’s it for this week’s edition, don’t forget to check back next week for another News-In-Review. Also, our Twitter feed is filled with news on AM and IIoT so don’t forget to subscribe there as well!

Security & Systematic issues in wake of IIoT (Authentise Weekly News-In-Review – Week 12)

Hello to our dear readers, welcome to the latest edition of News-In-Review!

IIoT is a term dense of meanings and implications. A lot of businesses see in its wake the possibility of unprecedented ROIs and some are already putting down the foundations to implement it in their proceedings. However, before obtaining the many benefits of data analytics, the proper system has to be put in place. One that needs to improve upon a pre-existing industrial network, fixing it’s outdated vulnerabilities, without the need for a complete overhaul. One that is able to withstand a growing risk of DDOS attacks from a growing number of sources thanks to the sensors riddled world we are constructing. And lastly, but not least, one that can assure quality processes and control of every step of the process chain.

If this is a topic you’re interested in, and want to dig in further, our CEO and CTO have written a chapter for Springer’s new “Cyberphysical Security for Industry 4.0” – due May 10.

Here’s this week news:

Forgotten factors that could take down IIoT

When it comes to IoT adoption in the industrial space, I’ve often found that operators worry about how they’re going to run before they can even walk. What this means is industrial operators let certain barriers to entry — primarily security and availability — keep them from even starting on their path to IIoT. In reality, there are certain key steps that industrial companies need to take well before they even attempt that transition.

Read more about these steps here.

Security Professionals Expect More Attacks On IIoT in 2017

Screen Shot 2017-03-18 at 12.28.16 AM

As technology vendors race to create more and more devices connected to the Internet of Things (IoT) the opportunity for hackers to get into these devices grows larger and larger, as these IoT devices are usually made with little to no regard for security. The fears of a large-scale attack waiting to happen were solidified this week when security firm Tripwire released the results of a study it performed about the rise of industrial IoT deployment in organizations, and to what extent it is expected to cause security problems in 2017.

Read the article and study at Onthewire.

Control is the key factor for implementing additive manufacturing in industry

According to the UK’s Manufacturing Technology Centre (MTC), control is the key factor for the implementation of additive manufacturing in an industrial setting. Speaking at today’s Additive World conference […] the MTC’s David Wimpenny explains the most important obstacles additive manufacturing needs to address. They created the National Centre for Additive Manufacturing two years ago, as a visualization of how they expect an additive manufacturing ‘factory of the future’ would look. However, Wimpenny is keen to stress it is not about the number of parts produced in the factory, but about control of the processes. Control of the quality and control of the data is the most important consideration for Wimpenny. As he says, “In a process chain, whatever you don’t control will be a problem”.

Read more here.


Don’t forget to follow us on Twitter and to come back in a week time to get a new glimpse at the future of AM, IIoT and all things in between!

Week in Review: October 25th to 31st – IIoT Prospects

We’ve got Industrial IOT (IIOT) in our crosshair since the launch of Machine Analytics, so maybe that’s the reason we focused on it this week. Or maybe not. Either way, here it is: As digital environments and tools become the norm, businesses that don’t conform to new standards will have staffing issues. A neat infographic shows the concrete way IIoT is helping oil and gas companies boost productivity up to 20% and we also get a deeper look at what cellular networks have to offer to interconnected sensors across sites.

Got your attention? Here we go.

Industry Could Struggle to Attract, Retain Staff Without IIOT

The oil and gas industry could find it hard to attract and retain staff if it doesn’t adopt the industrial internet of things (IIOT), Andrew Hird, vice president and general manager of Digital Transformation at Honeywell Process Solutions, told Rigzone. Speaking at the EMEA HUG conference held in The Hague, Hird stated that IIOT will drive new technologies and outlined that if the upstream oil and gas sector does not allow these new technologies to be deployed, it may lead to staffing issues within the industry.

Read more at Rigzone.

How the Energy Industry Can Use the Industrial IoT to Innovate

As they hunt for more sources of energy, companies are turning to the industrial Internet of Things (IIoT) to achieve these efficiencies and expand operations. Research firm Gartner estimates that 56% of businesses in asset-intensive “heavy” industries like oil and gas will have deployed IoT solutions by the end of 2016. By using wireless connectivity and sensors, energy firms can monitor their assets in the field and achieve higher utilization rates.

Read the whole article at Biztech.

Cellular networks in the IIoT

Typical IIoT applications present cellular networks with additional challenges compared to managing voice calls and high-bandwidth Internet traffic.

Cellular networks have emerged as key components of today’s Industrial IoT (IIoT) networks, especially when it comes to long-distance communication with IIoT endpoints that are installed at field sites. Cellular wide-area networks can provide coverage over several miles, and sometimes across countries, as opposed to the limited coverage provided by Wi-Fi networks. However, the typical IIoT application presents cellular networks with additional challenges compared to managing voice calls and high-bandwidth Internet traffic.

Keep reading here.


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Week in Review: September 19th to 26th – AM Materials’ Expansion

Hello, welcome to another week in review brought to you by Authentise.

This week got a lot of buzz going for breakthroughs and materials bringing excitement to the world of AM: we got 3D printed cemented carbide tools courtesy of Fraunhofer Institute for Ceramic Technologies’ (IKTS) new binderjetting technique, bioengineered plastic spitting bacteria to supply future space missions and a whopping AM breakthrough in flexible thermoelectric devices which promises plummeting prices for coming IoT clothing and more.

Let us begin.


Fraunhofer IKTS develops 3D printed carbide tools with adjustable mechanical properties

Fraunhofer IKTS will present 3D printed cemented carbide (hard metal) tools at the World PM2016 Congress & Exhibition… IKTS scientists used a binder jetting 3D printing method to produce the tools. According to the researchers, these 3D printed tools are of comparable quality to those produced using conventional methods, and can be made into more complex shapes.

Read the full article here.


Bioengineered bacteria could be used to 3D print food and tools on Mars

cosmocrops d printing best picture the martian

A Danish research team is working on a synthetic biology project called CosmoCrops, which hopes to use bacteria to make it possible to 3D print everything needed for a respectable space mission, using a cutting-edge co-culturing system. To this end, the team has designed a special kind of bioreactor and has bioengineered bacteria that can be used to produce the necessary 3D-printing materials.

Read more at Digital Trend.


Nano Dimension paves way for wearables by 3D printing conductive patterns onto fabric

Israeli PCB 3D printing pioneer Nano Dimension has just successfully 3D printed conductive patterns made from silver nanoparticles onto specially treated fabric. This achievement, realized in collaboration with an unnamed leading European functional textiles company, paves the way for sensors and electronics that are actually part of your clothing. It proves that even functional and ‘smart’ fabrics, packed with sensors, are realistic possibilities and do not need to be limited by movement, folding or wearing.

Read the full article here.


Research explores thermoelectric screen printing

In work led by professor Yanliang Zhang at Boise State University, high-performance and low-cost flexible thermoelectric films and devices were fabricated by an innovative screen-printing process that allows for direct conversion of nanocrystals into flexible thermoelectric devices. Based on initial cost analysis, the screen-printed films can realize thermoelectric devices at 2-3 cents per watt, an order of magnitude lower than current state-of-the-art commercial devices.

Read more about the breakthrough at ScienceDaily.


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