3D printing scalability: more than a hardware problem (Authentise Weekly News-In-Review – #114)

One of the major hindrances to 3D printing’s expansion right now is scalability. How can a process tailored and designed for customization also be an ideal candidate for the highly systematized environment of a production facility? How can it be employed to retain its features like agility and flexibility while providing the level of performance required to make a business profitable? The answer is multifaceted, and it has to do with the technology itself as well as the infrastructure that we build around it. Researchers are working towards designing printing techniques that are both reliable and efficient at various scales, and significant strides have been made in that regard. In parallel, one must consider the surrounding pieces of this puzzle, such as an automated pipeline and a smart, data-driven decision-making platform. It just cannot work if you couple 3D printing technologies with the old way of making factories work. In many respects, we must rely on AIs and robotic systems to make informed decisions. We are already starting to make this vision come to life, with IIoT networks feeding into simulations and triggering automated processes. Authentise is the leader in data-driven automation for production scale 3D printing: we already use machine learning algorithms to drive our estimation processes and thorough automation features throughout our 3Diax platform, and are excited to show you more of what we are working on very soon!

Israeli company announces tiny triumph in micron-level 3D printing

Nanofabrica micron-level 3D-printed part

Startup Nanofabrica (Tel Aviv) announced that it has developed an AM platform that provides an end-to-end bespoke process for manufacturers seeking micron and sub-micron levels of resolution and surface finish. Nanofabrica’s AM process is based on digital light processing (DLP), which is combined with adaptive optics to achieve repeatable micron levels of resolution. This tool in conjunction with an array of sensors allows for a closed feedback loop.

Read the full article on Plastic Today.

Scalable platform 3D prints bone

3D printed construct

Researchers from Syracuse University have achieved significant progress towards the engineering of large-scale bone tissue scaffolds. Stephen Sawyer and colleagues have designed, built and tested a scalable platform for the structured growth of bone mineral using only a commercially available 3D printer and inexpensive materials. The design surpassed previous difficulties associated with the supply of oxygen to bone growing cells. Traditional designs relied on oxygen diffusion through the cell containing structure, which had, until now, limited the size of bone structures that could be built.

Read the rest here.

Brain code can now be copied for AI, robots, say researchers

Modeling robotics on the human brain

Researchers at the Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology (KAIST), the University of Cambridge, Japan’s National Institute for Information and Communications Technology (NICT), and Google DeepMind have argued that our understanding of how humans make intelligent decisions has now reached a critical point. Robot intelligence can be significantly enhanced by mimicking strategies that the human brain uses when we make decisions in our everyday lives, they said.

Read the full article here.

We are going to exhibit at AMUG! Come visit us at booth #37 from March 31st – April 4th.

AMUG_2019_Booth_Map

Follow us on Twitter to keep updated on AM & IIoT related news as well as updates to Authentise’s services!

Week in Review: Sept 5th to 11th – GE in the game!

Hello and welcome back to another Week in Review!

This has been a HUGE week for GE as it rocked the 3D printing market bidding $1.4 billion for the acquisition of SLM Solutions and Arcam. Its push into the AM market has been a driving force in the industry for years and now it’s looking to become the one actively pulling the strings. Here’s a good review of the deal. On the side we have exciting news coming from R&D around the world: telecommunications will soon get a major boost from 3D printed fiber optic tips and South Korea puts yet another 3D printed implant advancement in its wide ranging surgical arsenal.

Let’s get to it.

 

GE bidding $1.4B for Arcam and SLM, speeds up 3D printing push

The logo of General Electric is shown at their subsidiary company GE Aviation in Santa Ana, California April 13, 2016. REUTERS/Mike Blake - RTX2E4CJ

General Electric launched bids on Tuesday to buy two of the world’s top makers of machines for metal-based 3D printing – Sweden’s Arcam and Germany’s SLM Solutions – for a total $1.4 billion to bolster its position in the fast-growing technology. “Additive manufacturing will drive new levels of productivity for GE, our customers, including a wide array of additive manufacturing customers, and for the industrial world,” GE Chief Executive Jeff Immelt said in a statement.

Read more about the acquisition here.

 

Researchers devise method for 3D printing complex structures on micro optical fibers

A joint team of researchers have developed a new and innovative method for 3D printing minuscule but highly complex structures on tips of optical fibers, which have diameters as small as 125 micrometers. … “The development of this new technology offers many advantages in terms of reproducibility, flexibility in the design of optical structures, as well as cost” – Keiko Munechika, co-authore of the study.

Read the full article at 3ders.

 

Korea develops new 3D printed facial implants

image: nanjixiong

Professor Yoon Won-soo from Korea Polytechnic University  have developed a new biodegradable 3D printed implants’ material which will not only greatly avoid any complications but could also accelerate the regeneration of natural tissue. We’ve been using patients’ own bones to produce the implant for quite a long time, which could cause damage to the patient. This new material, however, could be made into satisfactory implants directly and is easier to implant with only two hours’ printing time compared to the original eight hours.

Read all about it here.

 

Authentise is sponsoring the Additive Manufacturing Conference 2016 this year. Check it out!

 

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