IMTS: the present and future of manufacturing (Authentise Weekly News-In-Review – Week 89)

IMTS is now behind us! So much excitement that it’s hard to roundup. Our presence at the America Makes booth gave us an enhanced perspective of what the new manufacturing customer is looking for and the various exhibitors delivered a barrage of announcements and products. From the amazingly large INGERSOLL 140′ wide extrusion 3D printer to HP’s new Metal Jet productivity beast. IIoT was represented strongly as a means to automate operations, as was robotics and so much more.  Tough time choosing so below is also a video of a cool robot 😉

What was your favourite part of IMTS?

HP Metal Jet launches at IMTS 2018

Multinational information technology company HP has released HP Metal Jet 3D printing technology. Working on the same basis as its Multi Jet Fusion (MJF) binder jetting 3D printers, the new system marks HP’s first foray into the metal additive manufacturing sector.

Dion Weisler, CEO and President of HP Inc., comments, “We are in the midst of a digital industrial revolution that is transforming the $12 trillion manufacturing industry,”

Read more about it here.

Ingersoll showcases 3D printed winglet layup tool at IMTS

large 3D printer

Ingersoll Machine Tools Inc. showcased at this week’s International Manufacturing Technology Show (IMTS) Master Print, the company’s new large-format 3D printing technology with automatic attachment change to 5-axis CNC for aerospace-grade milling. The technology was developed in collaboration with Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). The part, says Ingersoll, weighs 430 lb/195kg and was printed in 6.5 hours. It was machined in 4.3 hours using the machine’s 5-axis technology. The material is ABS with 20% chopped carbon fiber reinforcement.

Check out the full article at CompositesWorld.

FANUC Display

 

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How large companies are (or plan to) leverage AM (Authentise Weekly News-In-Review – Week 74)

Big companies are the first to experiment and get to know the features of new technologies. Their job is to stay on top of the competition and new manufacturing techniques like AM are bringing new possibilities. However, part of the process is recognizing where the technology would be most beneficial. Right now, AM is being actively employed for prototyping and iterating the design of entirely new types of parts. Ford, for example, is experimenting with large-format 3D printing to bring to its car manufacturing. For other companies, where the runs are small and often full of complex parts, AM is a real game-changer. Airbus has been 3D printing panels for its A350 XWB model airplane, saving weight and money. Even though the dream of bringing AM to mass manufacturing plants is still a ways off, progress is being made to make it a reality. Adidas is testing the fast, production-level 3D printer from Carbon to produce as many as 100’000 AM-enabled shoe pairs by the year’s end.

3D printing: Ford pilot project goes large

The automaker is running a project with Stratasys, a manufacturer of additive manufacturing systems based in Eden Prairie, Minn., that’s testing the production of big, single-piece units as prototypes, auto parts and components. Ford recognizes the Stratasys system as a potentially more efficient and affordable way to create tooling, prototype parts, make components for low-volume vehicles (such as performance cars) and produce personalized car parts.

Read more at Plant.ca

Airbus saves 15% in material weight due to 3D printing

The European aircraft manufacturer, Airbus, has been working with Materialise’s Certified Additive Manufacturing for two, creating plastic parts for aircraft through 3D printing. The manufacturer has noted the benefits of 3D printing for small batch production, enabling more customization whilst being time and cost-effective.

Read the full article here.

How Adidas Plans To Bring 3D Printing To The Masses

Adidas is not only planning to introduce by the end of this year 100,000 pairs of shoes with plastic midsoles made via a new 3D technology created by Silicon Valley startup Carbon; it’s also making moves to ramp up that production to millions in the coming years, said James Carnes, vice president of strategy creation for Adidas’s namesake brand.

“We have a really aggressive plan to scale this,” Carnes said in an interview. “We are scaling a production. The plan will put us as the (world’s) biggest producer of 3D-printed products.”

Read the rest of the article here.

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