The experimental, and unregulated, field of Bioprinting (Authentise Weekly News-In-Review – #120)

Bioprinting is a squishy topic. It sounds good in its sci-fi theory but when you nail down the practical aspects it becomes much more complicated. The research is being done to bring that vision to reality, making over-the-top announcements, from vascular tissues to entire patient-specific heart 3D printing, that mislead the reader into thinking we might already live in the future. However, there are ethical and legal conundrums to consider alongside the technical hurdles. The field is so new that legislators struggle to comprehend what’s being done in the present day, let alone what will be possible tomorrow. Bioprinting is a concoction of frontier fields like stem cells, gene editing, and biocompatible materials. Researchers are taking unorthodox approaches to the problems they face, even employing generative textile designers to design organic structures. There will need to be safety regulations, protocols, all angles still need to be figured out. After all, we’re talking about our bodies, and we don’t want defective software or printing processes to pose any kind of risk.

Nervous System Works with Rice University Researchers 3D Printing Vascular Networks

Nervous System has been heavily engaged in experimenting with 3D and 4D printing of textiles in the past years, and all their research is paying off now as they find themselves engaged in the realm of tissue engineering. Assistant professor Jordan Miller [from Rice University] invited the Nervous System team to join his researchers on an incredible journey to fabricate examples of possible vascular networks via bioprinting—harnessing their knowledge of software and materials to find a way to create soft hydrogels.

Read the article here.

Scientists Create World’s First 3D-Printed Heart Using Patient’s Own Cells

Researchers at Tel Aviv University have successfully printed the world’s first 3D heart using a patient’s own cells and biological materials to “completely match the immunological, cellular, biochemical, and anatomical properties of the patient.” Until now, researchers have only been able to 3D-print simple tissues lacking blood vessels.

“This heart is made from human cells and patient-specific biological materials. In our process these materials serve as the bioinks, substances made of sugars and proteins that can be used for 3D printing of complex tissue models,” said lead researcher Tal Dvir in a statement.

Read the article here.

Bioprinting: What are the Legal Implications of Defective Design Software?

3D printing has taken off at lightning speed, with innovations emerging around the world continually—and virtually unregulated. While there may be some serious discussions and expectations regarding ownership and common sense regarding designs, most of the legal angles are still in the embryonic stages.

“In the medical 3D bioprinting field, three theories are, in principle, relevant to the protection of the patient against injuries that are attributable to defective CAD software: (i) medical malpractice (a subset of negligence law), (ii) breach of warranty under the Uniform Commercial Code (UCC), and (iii) strict liability,” states researcher Jamil Ammar. “None of these theories, however, adequately address the range of injuries that could potentially arise due to use of defective CAD software.”

Read the full article at 3DPrint.com

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Week in Review: October 18th to 24th – Standardization

Here we go again, another week in review for our wonderful following (and newcomers!).

This week is all about standardization: AM standards, legal conundrums and a plea for IIoT to get over the myths that have held it back, such as the need for standardization. Airbus has made ULTEM™ 9085 the standard material for components of its A350 XWB aircraft, bolstering a $15 billion material supply contract with Hexcel Corp. In the mean time, 3D printing’s rising potential to disrupt industrial manufacturing is being analyzed with a series of questions that pose product liabilty under a new light.

Let’s have a deeper look.

$15 billion Boost to 3D Printing Companies from Airbus Contract

Airbus have just announced it is standardizing on ULTEM™ 9085 3D printing material for use in the A350 XWB. OPM partners Hexcel Corp were also included in the Airbus announcement with the news of an update to their $15 billion supply contract. Hexcel make a range of advanced materials including composites for aerospace. ULTEM™ 9085 is a high-performance thermoplastic, offering similar possibilities to PEKK.

Read more about it at 3D Printing Industry.

Products Liability in the Digital Age: Legal Issues Generated by Additive Manufacturing

Although products liability laws are slightly different from jurisdiction to jurisdiction, new legal questions are beginning to arise with the advent of additive manufacturing. In the AM context, for the first time courts will need to address the seemingly obvious threshold questions of “What is the Product?” and “Who is the Manufacturer?”. AM also raises interesting questions concerning what specific theories of liability may be available to plaintiffs alleging injury from 3D-printed products.

Read the full article at Inside Counsel.

Busting 3 Industrial Internet of Things myths

Image for Busting 3 Industrial Internet of Things myths

Unlike consumer markets where standardization, formal or by market dominance, is key to success, for IIoT standardization won’t be a concern for decades. For industries wishing to pursue IIoT it is just to accept that for the foreseeable future there won’t be any standards on how to connect up all their things.

Check out this and two other major IIoT myths at Information Age.

 

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