Maybe now Manufacturers will take Cyber-security seriously? (Authentise Weekly News-In-Review – Week 84)

A bunch of manufacturing related cybersecurity stories hit the news in the last week. We hold little hope that it will change things.

First, over 150 GB of raw manufacturing data was released into the wild, then a customised virus hit the manufacturing operations of iPhone semiconductor supplier TCMS in a hit that was reminiscent of the Stuxnet attack on Iran’s centrifuges, and nobody noticed when an Israeli company suggested a way to get around the intercept problem uncovered by Chris Williams @Virginia a few years ago.

Truth is, despite representing 16% of GDP in the US, manufacturing is still seriously flummoxed by cybersecrutiy.  The gut reaction of many in the industry is simply to say: let’s not connect our devices then. That is increasingly impossible and dangerous to growth. Continued resilience to solutions will hamper our ability to bring manufacturing into the 21st century. We’ve presented solutions (both technological and theoretical) but await a more dynamic response from the industry. Maybe we’ll see more at IMTS this year? Join us there!

More Than 150 Gigabytes of Manufacturing Data Found Exposed on Web

A misconfigured data transfer server left sensitive data from big name car makers and their employees wide open to the Internet earlier this month, a security vendor has revealed. Itnews.com reports that documents belonging to more than 100 manufacturing companies were exposed on a publicly accessible server belonging to Level One Robotics, …

Read the full article on Assembly Magazine.

iPhone Chipmaker Races to Recover After Crippling Computer Virus

Taiwan Semiconductor Manufacturing Co., which makes chips for the iPhone and other devices, is recovering from a debilitating computer virus but warned of delayed shipments and reduced revenue because of the impact on its factories.

TSMC said that 80 percent of the fabrication tools affected by a virus outbreak Friday evening had been restored and that it expects full recovery on Monday. …

Read the full article on Bloomberg.

Researchers Develop Audio-Based Method to Detect 3D Printing Cyber-Attacks

Ben-Gurion University of the Negev in Israel researchers has published a study titled “Digital Audio Signature for 3D Printing Integrity”, examining the use of “audio fingerprints” to help detect cyber-attacks on 3D printers.
Screen-Shot-2018-07-24-at-23.39.58
Read the full article on All3DP.

Automation is cause for unemployment, or is it? (Authentise Weekly News-In-Review – Week 43)

There’s been massive outcry recently regarding the shift in automation employment in various industries, threatening nearly 40% of jobs by 2030. Factories are quickly implementing new automated systems for warehouse management, manufacturing and most menial tasks. Taking away manual jobs from the market, many are complaining it’s eroding the economy as a whole in the process. In fact, some countries are relying on industries that are seeing a massive shift to automation, effectively truncating and undermining their workforce. This is most dangerous to those regions struggling to rise above the poverty line, where traditional factories are being replaced by automated performance power-houses. Nonetheless, the data is showing automation is not characterizing unemployment as we feared. This is all the more pronounced in those countries where institutions have been put in place to enable the pursuit of more future-oriented occupations. If we look back at ATMs in the ’70s, we will see a decline in the number of employees per branch but the new system encouraged companies to build more and more branches, mitigating the effect. All in all, while automation is having an impact on unemployment per se, new possibilities are being created to make a smarter, more efficient system possible while keeping the economy machine churning.

 

This Economic Model Organized Asia for Decades. Now It’s Broken

Today, Bangladesh, Cambodia, and Myanmar are in the early stages of climbing that ladder—but automation threatens to block their ascent. Instead of opening well-staffed factories in these countries, Chinese companies that need to expand are building robot-heavy facilities at home. “The window is closing on emerging nations,” says Cai Fang, a demographer in Beijing who advises the Chinese government on labor policy. “They will not have the opportunity that China had in the past.”

Keep reading at Bloomberg.

 

The rise of robots in the German labour market

Although robots do not affect total employment, they do have strongly negative impacts on manufacturing employment in Germany. We calculate that one additional robot replaces two manufacturing jobs on average. This implies that roughly 275,000 full-time manufacturing jobs have been destroyed by robots in the period 1994-2014. But, those sizable losses are fully offset by job gains outside manufacturing. In other words, robots have strongly changed the composition of employment by driving the decline of manufacturing jobs illustrated in Figure 1. Robots were responsible for almost 23% of this decline. But they have not been major killers so far when it comes to the total number of jobs in the German economy.

Read the full article here.

 

Chill: Robot-related job loss won’t be that bad (probably)

Chill: Robot-related job loss won’t be that bad (probably)

[…] the ATM was highly disruptive. You’d be tempted to equate this disruption with job loss, as fewer employees at bank branches meant thousands were suddenly without jobs.

But you’d be wrong.

Since ATMs made it much cheaper for banks to operate, it led to a boom, of sorts, in building new branches. From 1989 to 2004, banks opened 43% more physical locations than it did in the period before ATMs — leading to more jobs in banking, consequently.And that’s not even considering the additional skilled laborers needed to install, configure, and maintain over 400,000 ATMs installed nationwide since the 70s. Or, there’s the drivers and guards needed to fill them. There’s those who work in customer service, laborers who man the assembly lines, parts companies responsible for the pieces within them, ISPs (and their employees) who keep them online, security experts who lock down the network from hackers, and so on.

 

Read the full article at The Next Web.

 

If you wish to be kept updated on a daily basis on movements in the AM/IIoT world, as well as our service updates and events check out Twitter feed!

We’ll be at Formnext 2017 between the 14th-17th of November! Come check us out at booth Booth # 3.1-A33.