How large companies are (or plan to) leverage AM (Authentise Weekly News-In-Review – Week 74)

Big companies are the first to experiment and get to know the features of new technologies. Their job is to stay on top of the competition and new manufacturing techniques like AM are bringing new possibilities. However, part of the process is recognizing where the technology would be most beneficial. Right now, AM is being actively employed for prototyping and iterating the design of entirely new types of parts. Ford, for example, is experimenting with large-format 3D printing to bring to its car manufacturing. For other companies, where the runs are small and often full of complex parts, AM is a real game-changer. Airbus has been 3D printing panels for its A350 XWB model airplane, saving weight and money. Even though the dream of bringing AM to mass manufacturing plants is still a ways off, progress is being made to make it a reality. Adidas is testing the fast, production-level 3D printer from Carbon to produce as many as 100’000 AM-enabled shoe pairs by the year’s end.

3D printing: Ford pilot project goes large

The automaker is running a project with Stratasys, a manufacturer of additive manufacturing systems based in Eden Prairie, Minn., that’s testing the production of big, single-piece units as prototypes, auto parts and components. Ford recognizes the Stratasys system as a potentially more efficient and affordable way to create tooling, prototype parts, make components for low-volume vehicles (such as performance cars) and produce personalized car parts.

Read more at Plant.ca

Airbus saves 15% in material weight due to 3D printing

The European aircraft manufacturer, Airbus, has been working with Materialise’s Certified Additive Manufacturing for two, creating plastic parts for aircraft through 3D printing. The manufacturer has noted the benefits of 3D printing for small batch production, enabling more customization whilst being time and cost-effective.

Read the full article here.

How Adidas Plans To Bring 3D Printing To The Masses

Adidas is not only planning to introduce by the end of this year 100,000 pairs of shoes with plastic midsoles made via a new 3D technology created by Silicon Valley startup Carbon; it’s also making moves to ramp up that production to millions in the coming years, said James Carnes, vice president of strategy creation for Adidas’s namesake brand.

“We have a really aggressive plan to scale this,” Carnes said in an interview. “We are scaling a production. The plan will put us as the (world’s) biggest producer of 3D-printed products.”

Read the rest of the article here.

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Fully Integrated Additive Manufacturing ➰ – October Newsletter

Those of you actually printing and building things; you know that making it happen isn’t just about one process or a single step.

That’s why one of our priorities has been integrating with other systems so we can support people getting stuff done rather than opening up many different programs for each stage. So we’re proud this month to have made real progress on that.

First, our integration with EOS printers went into production, further extending the reach of our Machine Analytics tools. That lets you monitor the status, utilization, failure rate and more of your entire production or prototyping facility, not specific to a single Machine Provider, as we told you last month. More transparency leads to better decisions, whether it’s in resource allocation or processes.

Authentise 3Diax Machine Analytics Schedule can tell you what is printing, where.

Integrating doesn’t stop with machines. We’ve just pushed our first integration with other software tools into production too: From now on, we can grab files from Materialise StreamicsTM, process them, and send information back to StreamicsTM. Our specific client wanted to benchmark internal vs. service provider costs without sharing IP. So we deployed our geometric search module, our internal quoting module, our external quoting module and our dashboarding module to give him a real-time benchmarking tool to help defend capital expense decisions and more. But now that this integration is live, you can take advantage of it too.

Of course, we’re integrating into large legacy systems. Those integrations come with significant security protocols attached, so every time we do another client integration we get more secure. Last month’s clients are all among the Global 2,000 top companies – so you can rest assured that our security has been tested, and tested again and that our engineers know exactly what it takes to integrate with your existing legacy systems, such as Single Sign-Ons.


Next up: Many more integrations! We’re thinking Zapier next, which would allow you to integrate our Machine Analytics into over 700 programs including ZohoCMS, Salesforce, Quickbooks and more. What do you want to integrate with? Tell us in reply!

Of course, there are new features coming out too, and next month we have a particularly big release ready to go out. You’ll hear all about it, but we’re also interested in the features you’d like to see more of. Recently our client conversations have revolved around 3 main interest areas, where process automation would be critical: Material Batch Control, Quality Assurance/Traceability Reporting, and Multi-site Print Management. Are they the ones that interest you too?

As always, contact us anytime! We’re going to be at FormNext in November – so if you are too, please let us know and we’ll make sure to meet. Just reply to this mail.

PS: Want to stay on top of weekly 3D printing news, try our weekly news-in-review straight to your inbox. Subscribe now.

Week in Review: 4th October to 10th – AM Put in Perspective

Here we go for another Week in Review.

Additive manufacturing is more than a production tool with advanced features and mouth-watering opportunities, it is a puzzle block of an international effort to realize the vision of the industry of the future, or Industry 4.0. As such, this week we saw further movements in international cohesion as AM standards become the focus of huge global collectives and more questions arise in the face of new financing and leasing unknowns.

Let’s dig in.

ISO & ASTM International Create Additive Manufacturing Standards Development Structure

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As questions arise and larger companies begin pumping out 3D printed components, the need has been obviously for cohesion. And both the International Organization for Standardization (ISO) and ASTM International have stepped in to take care of business, creating the Additive Manufacturing Standards Development Structure. This will offer a comprehensive and much-needed framework that those involved in both additive manufacturing and 3D printing can use for technical standards.

Read the full article here.

Financing the Fourth Industrial Revolution

Manufacturers are no longer restricted to traditional financing arrangements where they would pay for equipment over time and use their own personnel to monitor and service that equipment. Now a variety of purchase/service hybrid arrangements are available and, says Amos, financial executives are increasingly looking at a “fourth generation” of financing which looks “like a service contract by a service provider to a service user.”

Read more here.

New 3D printed titanium satellite inserts by Atos and Materialise are up to 70% lighter

The part in question is a highly loaded insert that is used as mounting point for big and heavy structures, including panels in satellites. As the companies revealed, a joint team performed a comprehensive study of currently used parts, and reduced their weight: in total, the weight was reduced from 1454 grams to 500 grams – a highly impressive 66 percent reduction. It currently costs about $20K to send a single Kg into orbit – so 3D printing more efficient components could save millions in the aerospace sector.

Read more about it at 3Ders.

 

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