Self-healing and other smart properties of the products of tomorrow (Authentise Weekly News-In-Review – #108)

Material sciences is one of the greatest contributors for the awe-inspiring new papers that are being released in recent times. Not only are we discovering fundamental new properties of established materials, but new meta-materials are also shining a new light on the possibilities ahead. Coatings that are capable of self-repair after scratches or cracks, textiles that change the knitting density based on humidity and more. 3D printing is also playing an interesting part here because it is both player and beneficiary of these discoveries: in some applications, the materials are born out of 3D printing’s ability to combine different materials in one new compound, in others these materials solve some of the technology’s major hurdles, like overhand printing or structural performance.

 

Fluid-inspired material self-heals before your eyes

Engineers have developed a new coating strategy for metal that self-heals within seconds when scratched, scraped or cracked. The novel material could prevent these tiny defects from turning into localized corrosion, which can cause major structures to fail.

Read more about it here.

 

Using 3D Printing, Researchers Combine Graphene Oxide, Seaweed- Derived Material to Create Smart Hydrogel

Researchers from Brown University are utilizing graphene oxide to strengthen alginate—a natural material derived from seaweed—and create a unique hydrogel that will become stiffer and softer in response to different chemical treatments. This innovation could be used in several applications, including to make more robust smart materials that react to their surroundings in real time.

Read the full article here.

 

Smart fabric changes thermal properties based on environment

The new fabric being developed by University of Maryland scientists. Credit: Faye Levine, University of Maryland.

For the first time, scientists have devised a fabric that can dynamically alter its thermal properties in response to the environment. The automatic thermal regulation means people would no longer have to take off clothes when it’s hot or put clothes on when it’s too cold. The breakthrough lies in cleverly engineering the fabric with two different types of synthetic yarn — one absorbs water, while the other repels it.

Read more on ZME Science.

 

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