MTC – Munich Technology Conference

Our CEO Andre Wegner will be present at the MTC – Munich Technology Conference. Contact us if you’d like to meet.

Where: Technical University of Munich, Germany

When: October 10 – 11, 2018

Does the Govt. know how to help advance AM? (Authentise Weekly News-In-Review – Week 69)

We see AM being the centrepiece of many govt. grants in recent years, and rightly so. The technology has the potential to boost the industrial capacity of a country, as well as draw the attention of research projects which would prefer the most favorable technological hotspot. So, are countries doing enough to spur innovation within their confines? What are the best practices to nourish the industry and its development? The key drivers are education, industry and resources. In this respect, finding ways to fill the current skill gap is crucial for the long-term establishment of AM within a country. For example, the UK has been developing wide-ranging curricula for AM through state-funded collaborations. At the same time, the industry needs time and resources to develop the know-how necessary, and this can come through government-backed research centers (see the US’s ORNL or UK’s NCAM) as well as distributing grants, like the Australian BioMedTech Horizons program.

UK’s First AM Apprenticeship Launching This September

The Manufacturing Technology Centre. Photo via MTC.
This September, the Manufacturing Technology Centre (MTC), based in the UK, will launch what are described as the UK’s first additive manufacturing apprenticeships, with the goal of addressing skills shortages within the industry.

The MTC houses the UK’s National Centre for Additive Manufacturing (NCAM). NCAM develops industry ready additive manufacturing processes. It also addresses barriers to the adoption of additive technologies, and legislative and standardisation issues facing the industry.

Read the full article here.

Russia’s $2.6B Jet Engine To Be Made Using AM

ODK-Saturn workshop. Photo via United Engine Corporation

The Aviadvigatel PD-35 is Russia’s next-generation airline jet engine. With a projected budget of 160 billion rubles ($2.6 billion) development of the engine is expected for completion in the next 5 years, and additive manufacturing (or additive technology) is tipped to be an important part of the plan.

For the engine’s development, Russian commercial aircraft developer and builder Aviadvigatel is working with gas turbine manufacturer ODK-Saturn – a company home to the state-funded Additive Technology Center.

Read the rest at 3D Printing Industry.

3D Printing BioPen Receives Investment from Australian Government

In 2016, researchers at the University of Wollongong partnered with orthopedic surgeons at St. Vincent’s Hospital Melbourne to develop the BioPen, a bioprinting pen that allows surgeons to draw new cartilage directly into a patient’s body during surgery. The BioPen project is one of 11 recipients of a $10 million grant announced by the Australian Federal Government. The grant is part of the government’s $35 million BioMedTech Horizons program, which aims to help move more Australian ideas and discoveries toward proof-of-concept and commercialization, as well as stimulating collaboration between the research, industry and technology sectors.

Read the full article here.

 

Follow us on Twitter to keep updated on AM & IIoT related news as well as updates to Authentise’s services!

We are going to be present at this year’s Rapid + TCT show from the 23rd to 26th of April in Fort Worth, Texasrapid-tct-logo.

 

Please don’t hesitate to reach us if you wish to meet!

Tackling Education in the World of Additive Manufacturing (Authentise Weekly News-In-Review – Week 63)

AM is here to stay but, for many, the technology is a valuable opportunity watched from afar. Why? A big skill-gap is plaguing the manufacturing industry, which has a hard time finding the right people to employ. How is education being updated to bring new engineers up to current standards? What is the role of industrial and public institutions in influencing education? How much knowledge can one attain with a get-dirty, DIY approach?

Countries around the globe are recognizing the impact AM is having on the manufacturing economy and, along with other advanced technologies, are redesigning curriculums to include these trends. Also, industrial conglomerates, who are the most afflicted by the skill gap issues, aren’t standing by: many are rising up to develop training centers and generate activities to turn the tide. Nonetheless, some students are taking matters into their own hands, not only applying themselves to learning but developing business ideas revolving around AM.

Singapore wants elementary schoolers learning 3D printing, robotics, more

Singapore’s Applied Learning Programme (ALP), which aims to deliver hands-on learning programs to primary schoolers, is being expanded. All schools will implement the program, which includes STEM activities like robotics, coding, and 3D printing, by the year 2023.

“Students learn by applying and by doing, and they learn beyond the classroom,” Ng explained. “They see for themselves how they can apply what they have learnt to the real world.” – Singapore’s Education Minister for Schools Ng Chee Meng

Read more about it here.

NCAM calls on industry to help plug additive manufacturing skills gap

MTC NCAM

Given the buzz around AM technologies, you would be forgiven for assuming the message has been received loud and clear but with the UK Government’s recent Industrial Strategy failing to highlight the importance of AM and around 62% of manufacturers planning to undertake some form of move to ‘Industry 4.0‘, the appeal for more education and relevant skills is extremely valid. Within the Manufacturing Technology Centre (MTC) in Coventry, the team at the UK’s National Centre for Additive Manufacture (NCAM) is currently seeking to answer that call by embarking on the task of addressing the AM skills gap.

Read more at TCT Mag.

3D Printing Entrepreneur Reveals Plan for 24h Sneaker Turnaround

A student entrepreneur who developed the idea, technology, and production of his own brand of custom 3D printed sneakers will see his “UnisBrands” products hit the market soon. Nick Unis, who is currently a final year accounting and finance student at Penn State University-Altoona, has been nurturing his idea for custom running shoes since high school. Having now joined the Happy Valley LaunchBox FastTrack Accelerator, Unis plans to ship the first UnisBrands shoes in Summer 2018, with the aim of averting 24 to 72 hours turnaround per pair.

Keep reading the article here.

 

Follow us on Twitter to keep updated on AM & IIoT related news as well as updates to Authentise’s services!

Building an Industry: AM Strategic Initiatives (Authentise Weekly News-In-Review – Week 45)

Additive manufacturing is becoming established in the industrial world and businesses are realizing its potential through integration and experimentation. Nonetheless, the road ahead is still to be delineated: the technology will advance, that’s almost a given. It’s the underlying framework of education and collaborations that will make for fertile ground in its development. It is apparent that the manufacturing world needs a solid foundation of standards and practices, something that has already been addressed by the AMTS (Additive Manufacturing Technology Standards), NIST (National Institute of Standards and Technology) and now the FAA is filing a strategic roadmap. Educational institutions around the world are starting to offer courses on AM technologies, even at MIT, to push the next generation of innovators into the fray. Just as important is the effort by businesses to offer opportunities to students and partnerships with research institutions, bridging the gap between skill and resources.

FAA To Launch Eight-Year Additive Manufacturing Road Map

GE Aviation's T901 Turboshaft engine for use inside the U.S. Army's Apache and Black Hawk helicopters. Image via GE Aviation

Filed for review in late September, the U.S. Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) has developed a draft Additive Manufacturing Strategic Roadmap, advising businesses of adequate practice surrounding the different technologies in the industry. The roadmap features key regulation information covering emerging considerations around part and process certification, machine and part maintenance, research and development and the demand for doubled-down efforts in additive education and training.

Read the full article here.

Additive Manufacturing, From Prototyping to Production

This 90-minute online learning session is a fast, effective way to learn from MIT faculty experts in additive and smart manufacturing about the cutting-edge of industrial 3D printing – from new materials and processes to the latest applications and technology trends. Join Professor John Hart as you discover how additive manufacturing is being used to transform business models and revolutionize manufacturing at scale.

Register for this free web course here.

New Center Introducing ESA Projects and Space Firms to 3D Printing

ESA is establishing a new ‘one-stop shop’ covering 3D printing for space in partnership with the Manufacturing Technology Centre. The MTC research organization, based in Coventry and home to the UK National Centre for Additive Manufacturing, will manage the new ESA Additive Manufacturing Benchmarking Centre (AMBC), which will provide a simple and easy way for ESA projects and hi-tech companies to investigate the potential of 3D printing for their work.

Check out the full article here.

 

If you wish to be kept updated on a daily basis on movements in the AM/IIoT world, as well as our service updates and events check out Twitter feed!

We’ll be at Formnext 2017 between the 14th-17th of November! Come check us out at booth Booth # 3.1-A33.

Security & Systematic issues in wake of IIoT (Authentise Weekly News-In-Review – Week 12)

Hello to our dear readers, welcome to the latest edition of News-In-Review!

IIoT is a term dense of meanings and implications. A lot of businesses see in its wake the possibility of unprecedented ROIs and some are already putting down the foundations to implement it in their proceedings. However, before obtaining the many benefits of data analytics, the proper system has to be put in place. One that needs to improve upon a pre-existing industrial network, fixing it’s outdated vulnerabilities, without the need for a complete overhaul. One that is able to withstand a growing risk of DDOS attacks from a growing number of sources thanks to the sensors riddled world we are constructing. And lastly, but not least, one that can assure quality processes and control of every step of the process chain.

If this is a topic you’re interested in, and want to dig in further, our CEO and CTO have written a chapter for Springer’s new “Cyberphysical Security for Industry 4.0” – due May 10.

Here’s this week news:

Forgotten factors that could take down IIoT

When it comes to IoT adoption in the industrial space, I’ve often found that operators worry about how they’re going to run before they can even walk. What this means is industrial operators let certain barriers to entry — primarily security and availability — keep them from even starting on their path to IIoT. In reality, there are certain key steps that industrial companies need to take well before they even attempt that transition.

Read more about these steps here.

Security Professionals Expect More Attacks On IIoT in 2017

Screen Shot 2017-03-18 at 12.28.16 AM

As technology vendors race to create more and more devices connected to the Internet of Things (IoT) the opportunity for hackers to get into these devices grows larger and larger, as these IoT devices are usually made with little to no regard for security. The fears of a large-scale attack waiting to happen were solidified this week when security firm Tripwire released the results of a study it performed about the rise of industrial IoT deployment in organizations, and to what extent it is expected to cause security problems in 2017.

Read the article and study at Onthewire.

Control is the key factor for implementing additive manufacturing in industry

According to the UK’s Manufacturing Technology Centre (MTC), control is the key factor for the implementation of additive manufacturing in an industrial setting. Speaking at today’s Additive World conference […] the MTC’s David Wimpenny explains the most important obstacles additive manufacturing needs to address. They created the National Centre for Additive Manufacturing two years ago, as a visualization of how they expect an additive manufacturing ‘factory of the future’ would look. However, Wimpenny is keen to stress it is not about the number of parts produced in the factory, but about control of the processes. Control of the quality and control of the data is the most important consideration for Wimpenny. As he says, “In a process chain, whatever you don’t control will be a problem”.

Read more here.

 

Don’t forget to follow us on Twitter and to come back in a week time to get a new glimpse at the future of AM, IIoT and all things in between!