Want disruptive? I’ll give you disruptive (Authentise Weekly News-In-Review – Week 18)

We are all starting to realize that AM is becoming the game changer it promised to be. This week there are mind-blowing examples of the technology being used to radically change the game economically and logistically all across the board. What do you think will be the impact on the manufacturing industry now that players realize that AM can bring shave costs in the millions of dollars like Boeing had on its Dreamliner production in collaboration with Norsk Titanium? Or when serialized production turnaround happens in days instead of months like Oracle managed to achieve with Carbon technology? On a wider note, AM will radically transform planning for operations where in-situ manufacturing is possible, making it much more economically viable to make use of local resources, especially in space activities.

3D Printing Titanium Parts Could Save Boeing Millions on Dreamliner Production

A 3D printed structural titanium component made with Norsk’s proprietary Rapid Plasma Deposition (RPD) process.

Boeing hired Norsk Titanium to print the first structural titanium parts for its 787 Dreamliner, a shift that the Norwegian 3D printing company said would eventually shave $2M to $3M off the cost of each plane. Strong, lightweight titanium alloy is 7 times more costly than aluminum, and accounts for about $17 million of the cost of a $265 million Dreamliner, industry sources say.
Boeing has been trying to reduce titanium costs on the 787, which requires more of the metal than other models because of its carbon-fiber fuselage and wings.

“This means $2M to $3M in savings for each Dreamliner, at least,” starting in 2018 when many more parts are being printed, Chip Yates, Norsk Titanium’s vice president of marketing, said in a telephone interview.

Read more about the collaboration here.

Carbon 3D print series of 10,000 parts for Oracle Labs servers

The 3D model (left) and a 3D printed branch (right) of the brackets stacked one on top of the other. Image & photo via Carbon

Oracle Labs, the R&D branch of multinational computer technology corporation Oracle, has used Carbon CLIP technology to 3D print a series of end-use brackets for use in its micro servers. 10,000 of the parts were needed to align circuit boards in the systems, and production was turned around within days instead of months. At first, Oracle planned on a component design reliant upon injection molding to hold the circuit boards. This method proved to be ineffective at producing such small parts within the required time frame, and the method didn’t support multiple design iterations.

“Instead of printing parts by inch CLIP let us print parts by hour. That’s game changing” – Craig Stephen, Senior Vice President Research & Development at Oracle Labs.

Read the full article at 3DPI.

Mining Materials for 3D Printing in Space

The first part 3D-printed from metal harvested from a meteorite. (Courtesy of Planetary Resources)

“Everything has a finite amount of resources. Everything has a cost and benefit”.

With limited resources, how can we populate multiple planets with only one livable environment? Fortunate for us, all of our resources originated in space. Planetary Resources made a point at the CES 2016 that mining asteroids was the future. It did this by using 3D printing and metal from a meteorite to produce a part. In addition, 3D printing may be the process of how things are built in space. Scientists have already 3D printed plastic objects in space, and they believe we can 3D-print metals. However, it might be simpler than this. If water freezes on the surface of the planets we are looking to build on, and there is hydrogen and water as a resource on these bodies, 3D printing ice in the shape of buildings might provide a robust housing. Sound nuts? NASA didn’t think so and awarded $25,000 to a team that designed a Mars Ice House for NASA’s 3D printed habitat challenge.

Read more about our space-faring possibilities at Machine Design.

 

Come back next week for another edition of News-In-Review and touch base at our Twitter feed where we share more AM and IIoT related news!

Enabling Research Through AM (Authentise Weekly News-In-Review – Week 01)

Hi everyone, welcome back to the new year with a more weekly 3D printing news from Authentise!

Through AM scientists are able to go where traditional manufacturing simply couldn’t take them. NASA is keeping up the pace for the entirely 3D printed rocket by testing more and more components up for the challenge, ROSCOSMOS is planning to add a bioprinter to the ISS’s arsenal and test it at microgravity and, while we’re at it, stem cell research is getting a boost from 3D printing’s ability to create cartilage’s structures.

Are you aching for your daily fix of science with a side of AM? Let’s dig in.

NASA Engineers Test Combustion Chamber to Advance 3-D Printed Rocket Engine Design

Recent tests of a developmental rocket engine at NASA‘s Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Alabama, produced all the performance data engineers were hoping for, along with the traditional fire and roar. But this engine is anything but traditional. Marshall engineers are designing each of the components from scratch to ultimately be made entirely by AM methods …The series of 12 test firings in late fall brought them a big step closer to that goal, said Andrew Hanks, test lead for the project. The fuel turbopump, fuel injector, valves and other major engine components used in the tests were 3D printed, with the exception of the main combustion chamber.

Read more of these test firings at NASA.

 

Russian space agency Roscosmos to 3D print living tissue on ISS

Russian scientists are planning to install and operate a 3D bioprinter aboard the ISS, according to an official source. They believe that microgravity conditions could actually improve the bioprinting process. […] They believe that significant progress in bioprinting can be achieved by placing equipment in microgravity conditions, since the lack of gravity could potentially help to keep deposited cells in place.

Read the full article here.

Scientists Are Creating New Ears With 3D-Printing and Human Stem Cells

BNWM3H.jpg

Inspired by the earmouse, doctors at the University of California at Los Angeles and the University of Edinburgh’s Centre for Regenerative Medicine have perfected a new technique to grow a fully formed human ear, using patients’ own stem cells. They begin with a 3D printed polymer mold of an ear, which is then implanted with stem cells drawn from fat. As these stem cells differentiate into cartilage, the polymer scaffold degrades, leaving a full “ear” made of mature cartilage cells. The new approach could “change all aspects of surgical care,” says Dr. Ken Stewart, one of the researchers and a plastic surgeon at the Royal Hospital for Sick Children.

Read the whole article at Smithsonian.

 

More next week

Week in Review: November 22nd to 27th – Collaborations Driving 3D

Hi and welcome to another Week-in-Review!

This week there is a treasure trove of evidence that partnerships and collaborations really do make a difference and show a rapidly maturing industry. This week’s examples go full spectrum: Renishaw and Dassault bang brains together trying to solve AM design and optimization issues, a collaboration between Auburn U and Nasa seeks to push the limits of space exploration even further through AM creating and another collaboration has designed and printed the best golf driver in the world.

Want to hear more? Here you go.

Renishaw and Dassault Systèmes pool expertise for the integrated AM experience

Screen Shot 2016-11-27 at 11.11.32 AM

Renishaw is collaborating with Dassault Systèmes, a world leading 3D modelling, simulation and industrial operations software provider, as part of its commitment to provide and enhance software for metal additive manufacturing (AM). “The 3DExperience platform coupled with QuantAM enables parts to be produced accurately from the outset, which is of tangible time and cost benefit to users. It marks the beginning of many enhancements we have in the pipeline to improve the AM user experience and streamline the front-end of the manufacturing process” explained Stephen Anderson, Renishaw’s Director of Group Software.

Read more here.

Auburn University and NASA sign Space Act Agreement on additive manufacturing

Lab

John Mason, Auburn’s vice president for research and economic development, recently signed a Space Act Agreement with Patrick Scheuermann, director of NASA’s Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville to explore additive manufacturing applications using metals, polymers and ceramics. “Great partnerships like this will help us get to places where we’ve never been before,” Scheuermann says. “We can make rockets like our predecessors did . . . but it’s really important to infuse additive manufacturing so that the Space Launch System is affordable and sustainable for decades to come.”

Read the full article here.

Subtractive and additive manufacturing combined to craft world’s most advanced golf driver

KD-1 final result_courtesy of Krone tot-LORE

Race car manufacturer, CRP Group and golfing manufacturer, Krone Golf have combined additive manufacturing and subtractive manufacturing techniques to craft what they believe is the world’s most advanced golf driver. The KD-1 is the first Windform SP 3D-printed driver clubhead with CNC machined titanium hitting surface. It is a composite driver clubhead where the different materials have a specific function and structural competence.

Read more about the driver here.

 

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