How Data is supercharging everything around us (Authentise Weekly News-In-Review – #127)

We are strong advocates of the power of data and the opportunities extend well beyond the industrial setting. Everything around us is being uplifted through the aggregation and analysis of data to get insights that would otherwise pass unnoticed or be difficult to grasp. And that is the key: making the data understandable and actionable. IIoT networks submerge businesses’ data centers with information and, to make it work to their advantage, new technologies like AR and VR are stepping in to make it all human-readable. Similarly, transposing medical scans into tangible, bleeding replicas for the doctors to practice on is all about bringing the data closer to the end user. In our eagerness to digitize everything we find ourselves often surprised by data we have gathered that, in hindsight, we never knew we needed. Reparations for the tragic fire at Notre Dame in Paris will be aided by 3D scans of the cathedral that were done in 2015.

Augmented reality: the new business tool driving industry 4.0

Augmented reality: the new business tool driving industry 4.0 image

How can organisations deploy augmented reality (AR) at scale, solve meaningful business problems with the technology and embrace industry 4.0, as a result, Four end-user organizations discussed these questions and their own AR journeys during a panel at LiveWorx 19. Howden […] emerged in the peak of the first industrial revolution but is now committed to embrace the fourth industrial revolution, or industry 4.0. It has done this, in one way, by looking to AR.

“AR has provided us with transformation and consistency,” said Maria Wilson PhD, global leader data driven advantage at Howden.

Read the full article at Information Age.

Prepping For Surgery With 3D-Printed Organs May Become Commonplace

Many doctors are using 3D-printed replicas of human organs to practice for complex surgeries like transplants. Technology is still expensive, but Knowable Magazine reports that as 3D printing gets cheaper, rehearsing a surgery on a 3D-printed replica of a specific patient’s organ could become the norm rather than the exception — a bizarre example of how emerging technology could make personalized medicine cheaper and safer for more patients.

Read more at Futurism.

Fortunately, There Are Incredible 3D Scans of Notre Dame

Thanks to the meticulous work of Vassar art historian Andrew Tallon, every exquisite detail and mysterious clue to [Notre Dame’s] construction was recorded in a digital archive in 2015 using laser imaging. These records have revolutionized our understanding of how the spectacular building was built — and could provide a template for how Paris could rebuild.

According to Wired, “architects now hope that Tallon’s scans may provide a map for keeping on track whatever rebuilding will have to take place.”

Keep reading here.

 

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3D Printing is a Biomedical Dream (Authentise Weekly News-In-Review – Week 101)

When it comes to the biomedical industry, there are key features of 3D printing which make it an ideal candidate for pushing it further. For starters, the complete customizability of its products, which is critical for anatomically unique physiques. Secondly, the technology’s accessibility helps bring these applications to a wider population, surpassing more cost-prohibitive options that may yet be less accurate. And thirdly, its ability to decentralize manufacturing for medical tools and resources is enabling us to provide for those locations far from traditional manufacturing infrastructure, from warzones to even space.

 

3D printed biosensor shows promise for glucose monitoring

WSU glucose monitoring biosensor

Researchers from Washington State University have developed a 3D printed biosensor for monitoring glucose. The innovative research could offer diabetes patients a more accessible and effective means of keeping track of their glucose levels.

Read more at 3D Printing Media Network.

 

Predicting Leaky Heart Valves with 3D Printing

Predicting Leaky Heart Valves with 3D Printing

Researchers at the Wyss Institute for Biologically Inspired Engineering at Harvard University have created a novel 3D printing workflow that allows cardiologists to evaluate how different valve sizes will interact with each patient’s unique anatomy before the medical procedure is actually performed.

Read more here.

 

Organs grown in space: Russian scientists 3D-print mouse’s thyroid on ISS in world first

Organs grown in space: Russian scientists 3D-print mouse’s thyroid on ISS in world first

Medical research has taken a leap into the future as Russian scientists have managed to grow a mouse’s thyroid in zero gravity using a 3D bioprinter on the International Space Station (ISS). And human organs may be next in line. Invitro says that maturation of printed organs and tissues in zero gravity occurs much faster and more efficiently than on Earth.

Read more here.

 

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