IMTS: the present and future of manufacturing (Authentise Weekly News-In-Review – Week 89)

IMTS is now behind us! So much excitement that it’s hard to roundup. Our presence at the America Makes booth gave us an enhanced perspective of what the new manufacturing customer is looking for and the various exhibitors delivered a barrage of announcements and products. From the amazingly large INGERSOLL 140′ wide extrusion 3D printer to HP’s new Metal Jet productivity beast. IIoT was represented strongly as a means to automate operations, as was robotics and so much more.  Tough time choosing so below is also a video of a cool robot 😉

What was your favourite part of IMTS?

HP Metal Jet launches at IMTS 2018

Multinational information technology company HP has released HP Metal Jet 3D printing technology. Working on the same basis as its Multi Jet Fusion (MJF) binder jetting 3D printers, the new system marks HP’s first foray into the metal additive manufacturing sector.

Dion Weisler, CEO and President of HP Inc., comments, “We are in the midst of a digital industrial revolution that is transforming the $12 trillion manufacturing industry,”

Read more about it here.

Ingersoll showcases 3D printed winglet layup tool at IMTS

large 3D printer

Ingersoll Machine Tools Inc. showcased at this week’s International Manufacturing Technology Show (IMTS) Master Print, the company’s new large-format 3D printing technology with automatic attachment change to 5-axis CNC for aerospace-grade milling. The technology was developed in collaboration with Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). The part, says Ingersoll, weighs 430 lb/195kg and was printed in 6.5 hours. It was machined in 4.3 hours using the machine’s 5-axis technology. The material is ABS with 20% chopped carbon fiber reinforcement.

Check out the full article at CompositesWorld.

FANUC Display

 

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Are we at the pinnacle of 3D printing technologies? Not even close. (Authentise Weekly News-In-Review – Week 68)

3D printing technologies have become common tools in prototyping and production environments alike. Many businesses think so highly of them that they believe we have reached the summit of what it can become. Have we reached the summit of 3D printing innovation? Not quite. When it comes to a manufacturing technology, there are many sides from which innovation can find a way to mix things up. Through experimentation in materials, the selection can expand, the manufacturing method itself can be radically reinvented, then there are post-processes etc.. If you combine all these variables you get a system of possibilities that is very difficult to extinguish. Hybridization is also important, bringing the best of different techniques to the fore.

First Thermoset 3D Printer Unveiled at Oak Ridge National Laboratory

The unveiling of the Thermobot 3D printer at the ORNL Manufacturing Demonstration facility in Tennessee. Photo via Innovation Valley Twitter

Magnum Venus Products (MVP), a manufacturer of composite application equipment based in Tennessee, has installed the first large-scale thermoset 3D printer at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Manufacturing Demonstration facility in Tennessee. With this new 3D printer, named the Thermobot, ORNL researchers will be able 3D print with previously unworkable materials.

At the grand unveiling Vlastimil Kunc, ORNL’s lead for polymer materials development said:

“The ability to print thermosets on a large-scale opens new possibilities with respect to the performance and integrity of printed structures”

Read more about it here.

With New 3D Print Smart Ink Objects Can Change Shape And Color

Featured image of With New 3D Print Smart Ink Objects Can Change Shape And Color

A team of researchers at Dartmouth College recently presented a new smart ink which induces shape and color changes in 3D printed objects. The innovation may be the beginning of 4D or intelligent printing. Applications could include a wide range of consumer products, biomedical utilities, and the energy sector.

“This technique gives life to 3D-printed objects,” explained Chenfeng Ke, an assistant professor of Chemistry at Dartmouth. “While many 3D-printed structures are just shapes that don’t reflect the molecular properties of the material, these inks bring functional molecules to the 3D printing world. We can now print smart objects for a variety of uses.”

Read more at ALL3DP.

NASA patents new wire-based Additive Manufacturing process for rocket engine nozzles

A team of engineers at NASA’s Marshall Space Flight Center, Huntsville, Alabama, USA, have developed, hot-fire tested and patented what NASA says is a new wire-based Additive Manufacturing process for the cost-efficient fabrication of rocket engine nozzles. The process, which has been named Laser Wire Direct Closeout (LWDC), uses freeform-directed energy wire deposition.

Paul Gradl, a Senior Propulsion Engineer in Marshall’s Engine Components Development & Technology Branch, explained:

“Our motivation behind this technology was to develop a robust process that eliminates several steps in the traditional manufacturing process.”

Read the full article at Metal AM.

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Our quantifiable future: the industry’s hunger for data (Authentise Weekly News-In-Review – Week 40)

Data acquisition processing is changing the world and the impact will be felt on larger scales than industrial contexts alone. IoT and IIoT technologies are gathering data points on many human and machine related activities, quantifying the world more precisely and pervasively than ever before. At this point in time, there are a few questions that can help us define the future of these processes: what are the next steps forward in this hunger for data? Do we have a functioning framework from which to extrapolate insights in a secure fashion? What will happen when technology allows us to make *anything* quantifiable? New partnerships are making data acquisition ubiquitous in the AM industry. This data will be used in quality assessments to improve part production and pipeline efficiency. Security is still paramount and new businesses and research projects are ready to prove that we have the technology to make safe and efficient data processing a reality. Businesses need to protect themselves against cyberattacks now more than ever. GPS technology is not anymore up to the standards required in the industry and everyday applications. Company Humantics is promising a microlocation-based future, which applied to AI and machine learning algorithms can enable new, high-granularity controls and services.

Oak Ridge Partners With Senvol For 3D Printing Data Collection Project

U.S. Department of Energy Secretary Rick Perry views the 3D printed proof-of-concept hull for the Optionally Manned Technology Demonstrator (OMTD). (Photo courtesy of Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Department of Energy

Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), co-developer of the Big Area Additive Manufacturing (BAAM) process and one of America’s leading technological research institutes, has signed a two-year research agreement with the Senvol additive manufacturing database. In the collaboration, ORNL will use Senvol’s Standard Operating Procedure (SOP) to evaluate the best processes for data collection and apply it to quality assessment of 3D printer feedstock materials.

Read more here.

Three-Layer Technique Helps Secure Additive Manufacturing

[…] AM could become a target for malicious attacks – as well as for unscrupulous operators who may cut corners. Researchers from the Georgia Institute of Technology and Rutgers University have developed a three-layer system to verify that components produced using AM have not been compromised. Their system uses acoustic and other physical techniques to confirm that the printer is operating as expected, and nondestructive inspection techniques to verify the correct location of tiny gold nanorods buried in the parts. The validation technique is independent of printer firmware and software in the controlling computer.

Read more about the system at RDMag.

Introducing Humatics: Revolutionizing How People and Machines Locate, Navigate and Collaborate

Imagine a tool that will only drill a hole at the exact right spot, a large format robotic 3D printer with unprecedented precision, a drone that hovers precisely indoors, and augmented reality glasses that project ultra-precise images onto the world you see. Now imagine AI and machine learning applied to every conductor, every factory worker, every robotic collaboration: technology placing our work within a broad human context. That’s where Humatics is going.

Take a look at Humantics at their website.

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