Data is king: what to expect from AMUG (Authentise Weekly News-In-Review – #115)

AMUG is here! We’re in the Expo at booth B37, come to say hi to our team!

Although not all AM companies have already revealed their cards right from the get-go, we already have a feeling for what is going to be a strong trend at this year’s user group event: data. Hardware has come to the point where optimizations need to happen elsewhere to see true production AM come to fruition. That means using smart frameworks and analytical software to iron out the deficiencies, making AM into a reliable production tool. Identifying defects before printing ever happens is key to minimize time and material loss. A collaboration between AlphaSTAR & Raytheon has created a workflow for the qualification of missile parts, thus not only perfecting the manufacturing process but also guaranteeing a part that is up to industry standards. We at Authentise have very recently announced a partnership with Microsoft to enable intuitive automations from within their Flow platform, further enhancing the power of our customer’s digital thread. Our guess is that it’s not the last we’ll hear of movement in data strategies from the event. Big players are investing more and more into machine learning and AI projects to get new insights into their operations and potential new avenues for innovation.

AlphaSTAR & Raytheon to present ‘Qualification of an AM Missile’ at AMUG 2019

[…] AlphaSTAR Corporation and Raytheon have cooperated on a project to predict the Additive Manufacturing Process and Service Loading of an as-built additively manufactured part. Using an ICMSE framework, and feeding through a building block Verification, Validation and Accreditation (VVA), the teams set out with the goal of identifying part issues before building the component, thus saving time, lowering risk and reducing scrap rate.

Read the full article at Metal AM.

Authentise Empowers Manufacturing Operators through Collaboration with Microsoft

Active Flow

Authentise has agreed to a multi-year collaboration with Microsoft to utilize Microsoft Azure and integrate Authentise’s workflow management system into Microsoft Flow. The integration with Flow, which goes live this week on the Microsoft Flow Gallery, gives operators directly involved in additive manufacturing quoting, production and analytics processes the opportunity to create their own automations without any coding knowledge.

Read the full press release here.

McDonald’s Bites On Big Data With $300 Million Acquisition

McDonald’s is set to announce that it has reached an agreement to acquire Dynamic Yield, a startup based in Tel Aviv that provides retailers with algorithmically driven “decision logic” technology. When you add an item to an online shopping cart, it’s the tech that nudges you about what other customers bought as well.

Read the full article on Wired.

 

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Week in Review: Aug 1st to 7th

We’re back. The Week in Review took an Hiatus but we’re back for more. Send us any news you have.

Loads of funding news this time. 3D Hubs landed $7m from Europeans, Formlabs closed on $35m mostly from Foundry (congrats to both teams, so well deserved. Amazing mgt and product!). Siemens Oil and Gas bought what it didn’t already own of a print bureau in the UK (see below).

Formlabs was called out for moving towards the industrial, but there’s a world between Formlabs’ definition of industrial and Siemens’s. 3D Hubs also called out more professional focus in a sign of the times but as Authentise learned the hard way its tough to swing from consumer completely the other way in this industry. They are ostensibly different markets. What do you think the secret ingredients to an industrial transition are?

More news:

Siemens Acquires Rest of UK Print Breau

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Siemens has recently acquired the majority stake (85%) in AM materials manufacturer Materials Solutions. The UK based company specializes in selective laser melting (SLM) materials and the investment is part of a growing interest by Siemens in advanced manufacturing technologies. “With the acquisition of Materials Solutions, we are able to secure world-leading expertise in materials and AM process development with focus on high-temperature super alloys,” said Willi Meixner, CEO of Siemens Power and Gas Division. “The company’s strength is to turn models into high quality components in record time. Clearly Materials Solutions fits perfectly within our vision for growth and application of advanced technologies within our Power & Gas portfolio.”

Keep reading about it at 3Ders.

Vibration Absorption Through Lattice Structures.

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Vibration absorption materials can offer good properties at the cost of stiffness and strength: now 3D printing can help solve this issue. Rigid vibration absorption lattice structures, created through 3D printing lattice of 3.5mm spacing and embedding steel cubes as resonators, provide efficient traps for vibration as well as high structural strength and optimal weight. Plastic and lightweight metals can be used, as long as the lattice structure and the resonators mass density ratio is preserved.

Read more here.

Raytheon Scaling up AM Deployments with $523m Missile Contract

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Arizona based Raytheon Missile Systems Co. got a $523 million contract from the Department of Defense for the manufacturing, test and delivery of 47 SM-3 Block IB missiles by the end of fiscal 2016. The contract could be replicated for a total of three option years and a yield of 52 missiles per option year. The contract is all based upon the company’s missile designs which incorporated 3D printing in many if not all aspects of manufacturing, including rocket engines, guidance and control systems and fins. Looking ahead, engineers at Raytheon are looking for effective ways to print electronic circuits and microwave components. “You could potentially have these in the field,” said Jeremy Danforth, a Raytheon engineer who has printed working rocket motors. “Machines making machines. The user could [print on demand]. That’s the vision.”

Read more at 3D Printing Industry.