3D Printing is a Biomedical Dream (Authentise Weekly News-In-Review – Week 101)

When it comes to the biomedical industry, there are key features of 3D printing which make it an ideal candidate for pushing it further. For starters, the complete customizability of its products, which is critical for anatomically unique physiques. Secondly, the technology’s accessibility helps bring these applications to a wider population, surpassing more cost-prohibitive options that may yet be less accurate. And thirdly, its ability to decentralize manufacturing for medical tools and resources is enabling us to provide for those locations far from traditional manufacturing infrastructure, from warzones to even space.

 

3D printed biosensor shows promise for glucose monitoring

WSU glucose monitoring biosensor

Researchers from Washington State University have developed a 3D printed biosensor for monitoring glucose. The innovative research could offer diabetes patients a more accessible and effective means of keeping track of their glucose levels.

Read more at 3D Printing Media Network.

 

Predicting Leaky Heart Valves with 3D Printing

Predicting Leaky Heart Valves with 3D Printing

Researchers at the Wyss Institute for Biologically Inspired Engineering at Harvard University have created a novel 3D printing workflow that allows cardiologists to evaluate how different valve sizes will interact with each patient’s unique anatomy before the medical procedure is actually performed.

Read more here.

 

Organs grown in space: Russian scientists 3D-print mouse’s thyroid on ISS in world first

Organs grown in space: Russian scientists 3D-print mouse’s thyroid on ISS in world first

Medical research has taken a leap into the future as Russian scientists have managed to grow a mouse’s thyroid in zero gravity using a 3D bioprinter on the International Space Station (ISS). And human organs may be next in line. Invitro says that maturation of printed organs and tissues in zero gravity occurs much faster and more efficiently than on Earth.

Read more here.

 

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Does the Govt. know how to help advance AM? (Authentise Weekly News-In-Review – Week 69)

We see AM being the centrepiece of many govt. grants in recent years, and rightly so. The technology has the potential to boost the industrial capacity of a country, as well as draw the attention of research projects which would prefer the most favorable technological hotspot. So, are countries doing enough to spur innovation within their confines? What are the best practices to nourish the industry and its development? The key drivers are education, industry and resources. In this respect, finding ways to fill the current skill gap is crucial for the long-term establishment of AM within a country. For example, the UK has been developing wide-ranging curricula for AM through state-funded collaborations. At the same time, the industry needs time and resources to develop the know-how necessary, and this can come through government-backed research centers (see the US’s ORNL or UK’s NCAM) as well as distributing grants, like the Australian BioMedTech Horizons program.

UK’s First AM Apprenticeship Launching This September

The Manufacturing Technology Centre. Photo via MTC.
This September, the Manufacturing Technology Centre (MTC), based in the UK, will launch what are described as the UK’s first additive manufacturing apprenticeships, with the goal of addressing skills shortages within the industry.

The MTC houses the UK’s National Centre for Additive Manufacturing (NCAM). NCAM develops industry ready additive manufacturing processes. It also addresses barriers to the adoption of additive technologies, and legislative and standardisation issues facing the industry.

Read the full article here.

Russia’s $2.6B Jet Engine To Be Made Using AM

ODK-Saturn workshop. Photo via United Engine Corporation

The Aviadvigatel PD-35 is Russia’s next-generation airline jet engine. With a projected budget of 160 billion rubles ($2.6 billion) development of the engine is expected for completion in the next 5 years, and additive manufacturing (or additive technology) is tipped to be an important part of the plan.

For the engine’s development, Russian commercial aircraft developer and builder Aviadvigatel is working with gas turbine manufacturer ODK-Saturn – a company home to the state-funded Additive Technology Center.

Read the rest at 3D Printing Industry.

3D Printing BioPen Receives Investment from Australian Government

In 2016, researchers at the University of Wollongong partnered with orthopedic surgeons at St. Vincent’s Hospital Melbourne to develop the BioPen, a bioprinting pen that allows surgeons to draw new cartilage directly into a patient’s body during surgery. The BioPen project is one of 11 recipients of a $10 million grant announced by the Australian Federal Government. The grant is part of the government’s $35 million BioMedTech Horizons program, which aims to help move more Australian ideas and discoveries toward proof-of-concept and commercialization, as well as stimulating collaboration between the research, industry and technology sectors.

Read the full article here.

 

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We are going to be present at this year’s Rapid + TCT show from the 23rd to 26th of April in Fort Worth, Texasrapid-tct-logo.

 

Please don’t hesitate to reach us if you wish to meet!

Bolstering, and Innovating, Local Manufacturing (Authentise Weekly News-In-Review – Week 08)

Hello everyone and welcome to another edition of the weekly News-In-Review, brought to you by Authentise!

There are quite a few factors that contribute to AM’s status as king of the hill of advanced manufacturing processes. By the very nature of AM, manufacturing is becoming decentralized, democratized and is opening doors to new industrial workflows, much more efficient and smart than before. This allows countries to diminish retain manufacturing (and the added value) locally, industrializing their economy (as IMTS’ development of India’s first jet engine). Integrating and developing new manufacturing paradigms like AM will create competitive advantages (as Russia is doing in 3D printed construction), jobs and invigorate the local industrial scene, and enable a greener and more material-efficient economic model (as the UK’s Green Alliance points out).

Here are just a few examples. Let’s take a look.

Intech DMLS developing “India’s first jet engine”

Intech DMLS, a metal additive manufacturing company from India, have announced the development of the country’s first jet engine series. […] the MJE20 engine starts small, powering unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) and remote-controlled aircraft. According to the Times of India, this will make them the first Asian country to develop an indigenous jet engine.

Read more here.

3D printing construction company Apis Cor prints 37 m2 house near Moscow, plans global expansion

Apis Cor, an additive manufacturing construction company based in San Francisco and the Russian cities of Moscow and Irkutsk, has used its own construction 3D printer to build a 3D printed house in Stupino, near Moscow. Construction of the 37m2 building took less than a day. “We are people,” Apis Cor says. “Engineers, managers, builders, and inventors sharing one common idea—to change the construction industry so that millions of people will have an opportunity to improve their living conditions.”

Read more about this ambitious project here.

3D Printing and the Green Economy

Capture

3D printing may play a role in creating a more resource-efficient economy in the UK according to a new study conducted by Green Alliance, a British think tank.
The study, “Getting it Right from the Start: Developing a Circular Economy for Novel Materials,” posits that using new materials and designing for recycling could lower manufacturing costs in Great Britain. The study was conducted for Innovate UK, the High-Value Manufacturing Catapult and the Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council. The use of carbon fiber, bioplastics and 3D printing technologies can create parts and products that are even more durable than those that use plastics created from fossil fuels. These technologies could also enable new, more eco-friendly business models and product lifecycles.

 

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