Bringing sports to higher standards through 3D printing (Authentise Weekly News-In-Review – #107)

Coming up on the Super Bowl, we are reminded that sports are a love affair with peak performance and health risks. 3D printing is a key player when it comes to looking after the athletes’ wellbeing while at the same time providing them the edge over their adversaries. Just looking at the NFL, head-trauma is a very serious problem, and Riddell is developing football helmets that are custom-fitted from scans of the athletes’ heads to improve its safety features. At the same time, 3D printing is already giving the upper hand for teams to win big. Chinese speed skating athletes won the gold at the last winter Olympics partly thanks to the new and improved glove tips, that are lighter, stronger and provide less friction, plus are custom made for the person wearing them. Innovation isn’t coming just to the frontline of sports, as companies like Nike and Adidas are pushing 3D printing to production standards, democratizing the new levels of performance that the technology enables.

 

Why NFL players are wearing this new custom 3D-printed helmet

helmet

Ahead of the Super Bowl, the NFL is testing out the first helmet to be made with 3D printing. Each Riddell helmet is custom-made for a player based on a scan of his head. Former players like Peyton Manning are excited about the comfortable custom fit and potential to make football safer.

Link to the video here.

 

3D Printing Helped Chinese Team Win Gold at 2018 Winter Olympics

The Chinese team, [at the 2018 Winter Olympics] had special gloves with 3D printed metal fingertips, courtesy of Chinese 3D printing company Farsoon Technologies. Glove tips are normally made of resin or gel, but the metal tips provided a number of advantages. These included less friction between the athletes’ fingers and the ice. Made from titanium alloy (Ti6Al4V), the tips were buffed and polished so that they had a smoother surface and produced less drag than traditional glove tips. They were also designed to be comfortable and lightweight – they had 40% less weight and higher structural strength, while the wall thickness was reduced by 75%.

Read the full article here.

 

How Adidas Plans To Bring 3D Printing To The Masses

Adidas is not only planning to introduce by the end of this year 100,000 pairs of shoes with plastic midsoles made via a new 3D technology created by Silicon Valley startup Carbon; it’s also making moves to ramp up that production to millions in the coming years, said James Carnes, vice president of strategy creation for Adidas’s namesake brand.

“We have a really aggressive plan to scale this,” Carnes said in an interview. “We are scaling a production. The plan will put us as the (world’s) biggest producer of 3D-printed products.”

Read the full article here.

 

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How the law can foster or hinder unprecedented industrial trends (Authentise Weekly News-In-Review – Week 42)

Uber’s current challenges in London and elsewhere show how governments and legislation can change the path of technology.

Industry 4.0 is no different. The technological trends that characterize the current industrial world have yet to be fully understood, both in terms of sheer research and in its spot within the law. Many issues are arising due to the intricately different nature of these technologies which pose new conundrums with regards to intellectual property (IP), operational and product safety standards and much more.

Nowhere this is more apparent than within the Industrial Internet of Things (IIoT) ecosystems, where its interconnected and decentralized nature makes it more susceptible to cyber-attacks and the new and overwhelming barrage of connected devices make the law-grounds much more difficult to thread. Is it all going too fast for legislators to keep up? It certainly seems so, as Southern China authorities have already issued the mandatory registration for all additive manufacturing industries citing “social security issues”. The trembling hand of these institutions, scrambling to grasp what they cannot entirely control, is starkly in contrast with many other countries where a race is on for the biggest slice of the innovation cake. They are putting together consortiums for the analysis and debugging of law-related issues and fostering the rise and gathering of activities which will, inevitably, spur consolidated operational standards, providing fertile grounds for them to grow.

How product safety will define the success of Industry 4.0/IIoT

Whilst safety protocols for IIoT equipment already exist within the Industrial Ethernet, from a product safety standardization perceptive, the challenges come when product advances outpace safety standards development. Then there’s the potential risk of fitting sensors to existing ‘redundant’ equipment to make these machines IIoT capable. In this scenario, the certified-design and safety parameters of the machine may be invalidated by making the device IIoT ready. Functional Safety for both hardware and software (to standard IEC 61508 and its associated standards) and Cybersecurity are also now defining factors when it comes to building in safety of an IIoT device. These aspects (and more) need to be carefully considered as early on in the design phase as possible.

Keep reading at Control Engineering Europe.

Chinese City Registers All Additive Manufacturing Industries To Ensure “Social Security”

Chongqing is an industrial and technological hub. Image via BASF.

Authorities in Chongqing, Southern China have announced that they will require all 3D printing companies based in the city to register with local police. Xinhua, China’s state news agency, reported that the objective of the measure is to both keep dangerous and illegal products from the public, whilst also controlling the production and sales of digital blueprints and data files for important specialist components.

Read the full article here.

The Industrial Internet Of Things (IIoT) And The Law

There has been surprisingly little attention given by the legal community to the issues and implications associated with the IIoT, either generally or within the utility industry. Discussion of the IIoT in the electric industry has been the province of operational and engineering experts. But IIoT operational and engineering challenges will inevitably present novel and difficult legal issues.

Read the full article at Mondaq.

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Safety & Security Angles of 3D Printing (Authentise Weekly News-In-Review – Week 28)

There has been much talk in recent years about what AM can accomplish. Likewise, the community is starting to take into consideration different sides of the equation. The health-related safety of the printing process has been often put under the media’s spotlight and questioned: a 2 years investigation conducted by Underwriters Laboratories (UL) and other institutes has provided a thorough answer to put everyone’s mind at ease. Also, as new frontiers of cybersecurity are exposing the risks involved in a digital manufacturing pipeline, the US Navy is exploring blockchain technologies to secure its IPs and production processes from outside interference. Nonetheless, AM is also fuelling safe practices, enabling University of Pittsburgh Swanson School of Engineering researchers to develop nuclear sensors that will be able to withstand the prohibitive environments within a nuclear reactor. Advanced situational awareness is critical to the safe operation of nuclear reactors, a lesson we learned at our expense in the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear disaster in 2011.

Is 3D printing safe? UL publishes Safety Science of 3D Printing

Assessing the powders at the CMU lab. Photo via CMU College of Engineering.

The short answer to the question, Is 3D printing safe? YesMarilyn Black, Ph.D. VP & Senior Technical Advisor, UL Inc calls for a “standardized method for measuring and assessing the emissions released during printing.” In a welcome to the study Black explains, “This will allow for consistent and comparative data to be obtained from laboratories, machine manufacturers, and suppliers of filaments.”

Published as the proceedings of the Safety Science of 3D Printing Summit held in Atlanta, Georgia earlier this year, the authors:

“hope this exchange of information will enable more collaborative discussions, research, innovation, informed policy advancement, and science based initiatives leading to the safe of use 3D printers.”

Read the article here and the entire study right here.

US Navy to employ blockchain to control 3D printers

The USS Gerald R. Ford. Image via the U.S Navy.

The U.S Department of the Navy (DoN) has revealed plans to use a blockchain to control its 3D printers. Lieutenant Commander Jon McCarter has now revealed in a blog post that the DoN will begin trialing blockchain this summer before issuing a report in September on the proof-of-concept. Blockchain is an example of a decentralized network which means data is shared across the network and not secured in one location.

By having a distributed network in this way the Navy can “both securely share data between Additive Manufacturing sites, as well as help secure the digital thread of design and production.”

Read more about the project here.

DoE grants University of Pittsburgh $1.3 million for 3D printed nuclear sensors

Inside the Unit 2 cooling tower at the DoE's Watts Bar Nuclear Plant. Photo by Mark Zaleski/AP

he University of Pittsburgh Swanson School of Engineering has won a grant of $1.275 million from the U.S. Department of Energy (DoE). The fund will support research into the development of additive manufacturing techniques to make electrical sensors – used to monitor conditions inside nuclear turbines.

At the time of this initial grant, Dr. Kevin Chen [the Paul E. Lego Professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering at UPitt who will lead the project] explained the necessity of nuclear sensor systems,

An important lesson of the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear disaster in 2011 is the lack of situation awareness of nuclear power systems especially under stressed or severe situations. When the plant was evacuated following the earthquake and tsunami, we lost the ability to know what was happening in key systems. This information blackout prevented the implementation of proper control mechanisms, which then triggered a disastrous chain of events.

Read more about it here.

 

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