Fostering electronics development through 3D printing (Authentise Weekly News-In-Review – #126)

The field of electronics has been particularly prone to evolution in the past, with the shrinking of the circuitry and increasing of computational powers. However, it’s always been an inherently multi-step production process which reduces the opportunities for exploration into new shapes, material, and properties. 3D printing is beginning to apply its features to electronics as part of the multi-material printing push. This not only enables innovators to experiment much more freely with their PCBs, but iterations can also happen much more frequently. For testing purposes, this is the perfect combination. New satellites are being developed (and sent to the ISS) as well as new eco-friendly electronics that dissolve into the environment. For many companies, this is the means to a faster product development cycle for items that had to be ordered from China, shipped, tested and ordered anew with a few tweaks. The ability to print electronics in the lab is a very powerful tool.

International Space Station Will Test 3D-Printed Materials In Orbit

Nano Dimension's 3D printing process in action.

New 3D-printed materials are going to space thanks to a recently funded partnership between Israel’s NanoDimension and Florida’s Harris Corp. The companies plan to create new materials to reduce the manufacturing of small satellites, an exceedingly popular market right now for applications ranging from weather observations to remote surveillance.

Read the rest at Forbes.

Collaboration sparks sustainable electronics manufacturing breakthrough

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Simon Fraser University and Swiss researchers are developing an eco-friendly, 3D printable solution for producing wireless Internet-of-Things (IoT) sensors that can be used and disposed of without contaminating the environment. SFU professor Woo Soo Kim is leading the research team’s discovery involving the use of a wood-derived cellulose material to replace the plastics and polymeric materials currently used in electronics.

Read the full article at EurekAlert.

NanoDimensions and Hensoldt Partner to Develop 3D Printed Sensor Technologies

The 3D printed radio frequency (RF) circuit board. Photo via Nano Dimension.

Israeli 3D printed electronics manufacturer NanoDimension has partnered with Hensoldt, a German-headquartered sensor technology specialist. The two companies will use the DragonFly electronics 3D printer to develop applications for Hensoldt’s security and defense division. Thomas Stocker, Hensoldt’s Head of Engineering, said,

“Our focus is on providing our customers with the highest quality cutting-edge innovations […] By using the DragonFly, we’ve already accelerated our application development.”

Read the full article at 3D Printing Industry.

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Week in Review: 4th October to 10th – AM Put in Perspective

Here we go for another Week in Review.

Additive manufacturing is more than a production tool with advanced features and mouth-watering opportunities, it is a puzzle block of an international effort to realize the vision of the industry of the future, or Industry 4.0. As such, this week we saw further movements in international cohesion as AM standards become the focus of huge global collectives and more questions arise in the face of new financing and leasing unknowns.

Let’s dig in.

ISO & ASTM International Create Additive Manufacturing Standards Development Structure

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As questions arise and larger companies begin pumping out 3D printed components, the need has been obviously for cohesion. And both the International Organization for Standardization (ISO) and ASTM International have stepped in to take care of business, creating the Additive Manufacturing Standards Development Structure. This will offer a comprehensive and much-needed framework that those involved in both additive manufacturing and 3D printing can use for technical standards.

Read the full article here.

Financing the Fourth Industrial Revolution

Manufacturers are no longer restricted to traditional financing arrangements where they would pay for equipment over time and use their own personnel to monitor and service that equipment. Now a variety of purchase/service hybrid arrangements are available and, says Amos, financial executives are increasingly looking at a “fourth generation” of financing which looks “like a service contract by a service provider to a service user.”

Read more here.

New 3D printed titanium satellite inserts by Atos and Materialise are up to 70% lighter

The part in question is a highly loaded insert that is used as mounting point for big and heavy structures, including panels in satellites. As the companies revealed, a joint team performed a comprehensive study of currently used parts, and reduced their weight: in total, the weight was reduced from 1454 grams to 500 grams – a highly impressive 66 percent reduction. It currently costs about $20K to send a single Kg into orbit – so 3D printing more efficient components could save millions in the aerospace sector.

Read more about it at 3Ders.

 

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